Comunidad pica a un atracador y violador.

one of the most useful postgraduate degrees an international student can earn is a Master of Business Administration (MBA). This degree opens many doors regarding your employment, or any business endeavors you wish to pursue. MBAs are available to students who have already earned a bachelor's degree. Whatever your reason for considering earning an MBA, you’re going to want to begin the process having answered some key questions: What is an MBA? Why earn an MBA? How can an MBA benefit your career? How do you begin? What is an MBA? The MBA degree is widely believed to be one of the most prestigious and sought-after degrees in the world. Students of MBA programs study the theory and application of business and management principles. This type of study equips students with knowledge that can be applied to a variety of real-world business industries and situations.​ Why earn an MBA? Students may ask, what is an MBA for? In today's fast-paced economy, the MBA is the most popular professional degree around the world. The program blends advanced skills in business and management with real-world experience to prepare graduates for starting or advancing in a management career in any field they choose. In many cases, an MBA degree is required for executive and senior management positions. There are some companies who will not even consider applicants unless they have an MBA degree. Business school professors say MBA programs help students develop the skills required to excel as business executives, such as the ability to quickly and accurately analyze large amounts of information and the ability to develop smart solutions to business problems. How can an MBA benefit your career? Some of the reasons and benefits include: Advancing your career - This can mean a number of different things. In a circumstance where you have worked with a company and earned an MBA later on in your employment with them, you can leverage your position into a more prominent role. The best way to do so would be to keep an eye for in-house promotions that you could see yourself advancing to and being prepared to apply for it with your new credentials. An MBA is highly esteemed in nearly any industry and will often fast track you to better opportunities. Developing your business savvy - Your MBA will help in growing your professional network. You will come across many opportunities to connect with other MBAs and companies seeking to work with an MBA graduate. Utilizing the skills you learn from having an MBA will be invaluable in helping you with job security. Your degree will often make you an indispensable team member. Leading in an emerging field - Often these days, knowing an industry versus knowing how to maneuver in that industry with expertise will be the quality employers will seek. Many people can be taught how to work in specific industries, but not everyone will have the capacity to lead in said industries. Equipped with your MBA, you will likely be a frontrunner in any leading role in a field that is still budding. Starting your own business - Becoming an entrepreneur might be one of the most popular reasons to earn an MBA. To excel as an entrepreneur, you’ll need to learn to communicate effectively and persuasively. For many people, these skills don’t come naturally, but now more than ever, business schools have come to realize how critical it is for their students to graduate with the personal skills required for effective leadership. Business school is also the safest place to test out your most creative, outrageous, and ambitious ideas without the pressure and fear of failure if that company or those ideas don't work. You'll have teachers and mentors guiding you along the way as you search for your big idea. How do you begin? You’ll want to begin by choosing a school. When searching for a college or university in the US to pursue an MBA, here are a few things to consider: A good place to start is program length. There are a few options on what to pursue and how when it comes to an MBA. Full-time MBA programs in the US typically take two years to complete, but many programs also have one-year, accelerated options. Part-time MBA programs allow the flexibility of attending evening and/or weekend classes to accommodate to life’s busy schedule. Accelerated MBA programs are another recent addition to the MBA in the US offerings. Targeted at students with a background in business education (or the ability to make up for lost time through self-study), accelerated MBA programs in the US can take anywhere from 12-18 months to complete. Because of their emphasis on speed they spend considerably less time reviewing introductory material and eliminate many opportunities for degree specialization. Your options are plentiful, but many people will consider rankings and student satisfaction when choosing a school. Schools throughout the US such as Auburn University in Alabama, American University in Washington, DC, Emory University in Georgia, or Purdue University in Indiana that are ranked in the top 100 schools for MBAs are good ones to consider. Once you find an MBA program you want to... Begin the application process. There are actually three stages to the admissions cycle: pre-application, application, and post-application. Some business schools also give prospective MBAs three different application deadlines by separating the admissions season into rounds. Being aware of when each round occurs lets prospective students know when to complete the GMAT, get letters of recommendation, and prepare all other material required for admissions. If you have the chance to interview for programs where there’s the option to do so, be sure to take advantage. Like most application processes your resume, recommendations, and a completed application are required. Beyond the standard, an MBA application will include essays, transcripts, and GMAT scores. The goal for applicants is to present a strong application across all the evaluation materials. The stronger each element of the application is the higher the chance of being admitted in an MBA program in the USA. Most American business schools-regardless of the major focus-will train you in the principles of general business management. These principles include a combination of accounting, economics, finance, marketing and statistics, among other topics. American universities also offer a wealth of specialized M.B.A. programs and classes to tailor your degree. Depending on your intended career goals, you'll find programs that offer a more focused approach, including business administration, finance, human resources, information technology, marketing, nonprofit administration, and more. THEORY IN PRACTICE At every level, the American higher education system is different. Foundational principles and theories must be taught, but they are only mastered through practice. MBA programs in the United States strongly reflect this teaching philosophy. You will examine real-world case studies and business scenarios in order to devise strategies, business plans, budgets, etc. These types of projects will prepare you for real-life business situations and to approach them with practical knowledge. “In logistics management class, we had case studies to discuss: Ford company, HP, Ralph Lauren, and so on. We assumed that we were managers and analyzed the problems and solutions. We applied strategies that we learned from the textbook to solve problems. This is a very good part,” explains Boonpa Ing-Anuraksakul, from Thailand, studying Logistics Management at Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno, Nevada. The majority of MBA programs will have an internship requirement. Internships are an excellent way to really explore your future career and apply your studies. The companies for which you intern are thriving businesses and you will be working in a fast-paced environment. They will have professional expectations of you. While internships provide you with a practical learning environment, they are a prime setting for networking. Networking is one of the most powerful tools for your career. While you are an intern, take advantage of the opportunity to meet and network with current professionals. They may help you get a job or be your future colleagues. “An internship is a requirement in my curriculum. I believe this is helpful because the college encourages students to apply the skills outside the classroom and develop experience in the real world before graduating,” says Heejoong Kim, from Korea, studying Management and Marketing at Loyola University New Orleans. An internship will not only give you valuable experience, you will find that having a reputable American company listed on your resume will be invaluable. “When I graduate with my MBA, I will be competing in a very global job market. Having experience interacting with people from different cultures I believe will give me an edge in the professional world,” stated Juri Adrianto, from Indonesia, an MBA student in Information Systems at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Supply chain management is one of the fastest growing business specialties across the globe. The Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas has created a Supply chain management department where MBA students specialize in this popular career. In fact, the majority of international students in the Walton MBA choose to specialize in Supply Chain due to the quickly expanding global job market in the field and the international reputation of the faculty. MBA Supply Chain majors study subjects such as modeling, forecasting, transportation strategies and global logistics.The Walton College MBA program also allows them to customize the program with special workshops such as Negotiation Skills, Networking, RFID technologies and Advanced Access. The program also provides one-on-one personal coaching in resume writing, job interview skills, salary negotiations and how to create the best first impression. FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY A one-year accelerated MBA with a concentration in Global Business attracts students from around the world to Fairleigh Dickinson University, near New York City, because of its focus on managing a multinational workforce and expanding into global markets. Having met the highest standards, the program is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The MBA program features a curriculum that covers the models, theories, concepts and practices that successful organizations utilize to gain a competitive advantage within the framework of the global economy. Concepts are brought to reality for students, with structured corporate visits and a 10-day overseas business trip. LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS Loyola University New Orleans M.B.A. program prepares students to become leaders in both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in the increasingly global marketplace. The program is extremely flexible with student's schedules, allowing them to attend either full-time or part-time. Students are given advanced training in courses, such as: Leadership Dynamics, Ethical and Legal Responsibility, Advanced Financial Management, Global Supply Chain Management, Management Control and Decision-Making and Total Global Strategy. Partnerships with local businesses allow M.B.A. students to apply their studies outside of the classroom. Recently, the Entrepreneurial Consulting class partnered with the South Coast Angel Fund. Students' research and due diligence produced a $500K investment in a Social Media startup company. It’s time to take the next step in your professional life. Either your work experience, bachelor’s degree or career interests have all gathered together to show you what your next step in life is: your MBA. Doing a Master’s in Business Administration is a great way to direct your career into success, knowing that in most jobs having the MBA degree gets you ahead of the game. Today, there are more than 450 universities in the United States that offer MBA programs, and EduBookings can help you get admitted into hundreds of them and help you choose the top MBA colleges in America. Dozens of concentrations are also offered in many of the Business Schools, opening a world of opportunities to students. EduBookings works with over 120 universities in the United States, offering competitive and highly ranked MBA programs. Getting ready to apply for an MBA in the USA can be a little overwhelming. But that’s why international student’s agencies like EduBookings are here to help. We can make the entire process easier, better and get your acceptance letter faster, as oppose as doing it by yourself. Getting your documents ready, researching for minimum requirements, finding the right program for you, learning which standardized tests you need to take, and many more steps shouldn’t scare you and prevent you from doing your MBA in the USA. Understanding there is a lot to have in mind, we have prepared a list of things to take into consideration when studying abroad in the U.S and getting ready to apply for your MBA. Check the minimum requirements. Find out if you need to take the GMAT test, what is the minimum GPA required from your bachelor’s degree and if work experience is a requirement for admission. Make sure you meet the minimum criteria, as the MBA process is very competitive and if you don’t meet the criteria don’t get discouraged. EduBookings can help you waive some of the requirements or find the right university for you. Align your finances with your MBA plans and get your expectations right. Learn the cost of tuition, cost of living and calculate if it falls within your budget. Find out if there are employment options. While doing your MBA in the USA, most universities offer employment options to international students, such as teacher assistantships and mentor programs. This could be a relief to your finances and also a great way of practicing what you are learning. Learn how many international students are enrolled in your potential university. Intercultural socialization has been proven to help build a successful academic program. Dealing with different cultures and nationalities is a great way to open your mind to new experiences. Find out if the business school of your desired university is accredited. You want to make sure you will get the best value of your money when choosing a university to do your MBA in the USA. Having a national or international accreditation guarantees that the university is reputable and its Business program, well recognized. Check if you need a credential evaluation. Most universities need help understanding your degree from your country, course by course. For this reason, organizations such as WES offer a credential evaluation of your studies, an admission requirement for most MBA programs. The cost of this evaluation value between $200 and $300, approximately. Prepare a good resume. Showing work experience plays a key role in the admission departments of the universities. In some cases, 3 or more years of work experience can help you wave minimum requirements such as the GMAT or the minimum GPA. Choosing a concentration when planning your MBA in the U.S is quite important. Specializing your master’s can help you shape your career and paint a sharper panorama of your future as a working business professional. Here are some of the most popular MBA concentrations in the USA: ACCOUNTING FINANCE MARKETING REAL STATE DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS ANALYTICS INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS ENTREPRENEURSHIP HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OPERATION MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNET MARKETING NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP PUBLIC MANAGEMENT TAXATION LOOKING FOR AN EASY WAY TO FIND YOUR MBA CONCENTRATION? Finding the right concentration for your MBA in the United States can be difficult, which is why EduBookings.com has created this online search tool for international students looking to begin the MBA abroad. Take a second to look at the video below and learn for yourself how easy it can be to find the right university that fits your needs, using the tool below: When studying abroad, meeting people from all over the world is a crucial aspect of your education. Understanding the intricacies of all the cultures and nationalities can be a great opportunity for you to open your mind and learn from others. Also, knowing that the university is welcoming to international students, and diversity is integrated into their business programs is definitely key. Here are some of the Business Schools with most international students, according to the U.S News & World Report: Syracuse University with 73.1% of international students enrolled in The Martin J. Whitman School of Management. The University of Connecticut with 64.5% of international students. Pace University with 52.1% of international students enrolled in the Lubin School of Business The University of Tampa with 51.7% of international students enrolled in the John H. Sykes College of Business. The University of San Diego with 50.6% of international students. As a student or young professional, you may consider pursuing a Master of Business Administration. An MBA is a popular way to build business and management skills, while also advancing in your career. You gain many invaluable skills, build a strong network, open your career path and learn to think about industry trends and issues differently. An MBA helps set you up for success in the competitive business industry and offers you credibility. But before you decide to make the investment, here’s an outline of what you need to know about an MBA program. What is an MBA? A Master of Business Administration degree, also known as an MBA, is an internationally recognized degree with a focus on refining skills needed in business and management careers. An MBA provides students with practical experience needed to succeed in such roles. The program first began at Harvard University in the United States, and has grown into one of the most popular professional degree programs internationally. It’s most commonly offered in English and takes two years to complete as a full-time student, however it’s possible to enroll in a single-year MBA program. You may also complete an MBA as a part-time student if you’re unable to commit your time entirely. Individuals who have previous managerial experience in the industry may apply for the executive MBA program (EMBA). What are the admission requirements? Below you’ll find a list of the general requirements for an MBA program, however each school may differ. To learn specific details, please contact your host school or explore their website. Note: if you meet the minimum admission requirements, this does not guarantee you a secure spot in the program. An undergraduate degree from a recognized institution with a B average in the final two years of studies Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Minimum two years relevant work experience English language proficiency score in IELTS or TOEFL (if studies weren’t completed in English) Completion of school’s online application which may include the following: essay(s), statement of interest, recent resume, two (or more) references, transcripts, GMAT or GRE scores What courses to expect When you choose to pursue an MBA, you are provided with a much better understanding of the world of business. Some of the programs you will be enrolled in include the following: Finance Accounting Business Ethics Economics Marketing Organizational Behaviour Entrepreneurship Business Law Business Communication Why get an MBA? Leadership skills Leadership skills Students who enroll in an MBA program are learning alongside bright, driven, high-strung personalities. When it comes to group projects, you will gain a lot of experience in leadership and conflict resolution. Working in a group setting naturally provides you with communication skills and the ability to motivate others as you all have one goal in common. In addition, completing an MBA provides you with credibility and shows other industry professionals you are an expert in the field, and are dedicated to the industry. Build a network Build a network of like minded people On top of being taught by some of the best mentors in the industry, you are constantly surrounded by like minded individuals who you can discuss industry trends and issues with. You both challenge and learn from each other, and connect on different topics, creating a type of community. This network could be incredibly useful to you whether you are on the hunt for a new job or are in need of someone to brainstorm ideas with when building a business. In addition to this, the school’s name will further connect you to other industry professionals. Career opportunities Career opportunities Many pursue an MBA to expand their career options, because with such a degree comes new skills you can apply in a number of fields. Having an MBA also provides you with higher chances of securing a managerial role, which in turn may present a higher salary. Some individuals pursue an MBA with the idea they will one day own their own company. Many leaders in the Fortune 500 companies have completed an MBA. This is not to say an MBA will guarantee a successful billion dollar company, however it opens many doors. Different perspective Think Globally Completing an MBA enhances your knowledge in the business and management industry, and allows you to think globally about big business issues. You learn to reflect much deeper and think from various angles when it comes to trends and issues in the industry. This in turn allows you to develop and apply smart solutions. It’s important to offer a fresh and unique perspective to potential future employers and employees. This specifically sets you apart from your competitors. So, you must now decide if an MBA is worth it. Will it help advance your career? Do the courses interest you? Are you in search of a business school in Canada or the USA? Register with ApplyBoard and find out which business schools are the best fit for you. Curious to know what the top business schools in Canada are? Read about it in our blog here! Adrianna Dyczkowsky, Public Relations Specialist at ApplyBoard Tags: Higher Education, International Education, Management, Masters, MBA, students, study abroad One Comment Know the facts: Western University Ivey Business School - ApplyBoard […] Here’s what you need to know about a Master’s in Business Administration […] What is a Master of Business Administration? A Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is a graduate level degree awarded to students with an advanced knowledge of business. MBA's cultivate skills in leadership with a focus on courses such as accounting, finance, economics, marketing and more. Start Your Master of Business Administration with No GMAT Required In any business-related career field, the MBA degree is highly sought after. The Master of Business Administration program at GCU enhances a broad range of marketable skills that can give job applicants an edge. Many working professionals want to get started on an MBA program online but lack the time to study for the GMAT. The Colangelo College of Business addresses this issue by inviting you to apply for the MBA program, with no GMAT required. Future business leaders and executives will focus on leadership development, operations management and organizational growth. GCU filters these content areas through the lens of ethical decision-making and critical thinking with a Christian worldview. GCU is a regionally accredited, private university. The core programs from the Colangelo College of Business are approved by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs. The Benefits of Having an MBA The online MBA with no GMAT required offers a path for deepening your understanding of the business knowledge, skills and processes that fuel success. In this MBA program, you will enhance these skills: Transformational leadership Effective communication Ethical decision-making Critical thinking and analysis Productive networking This master’s in business administration program is designed with a broad range of business fields in mind. As an MBA candidate, you will develop transferable skills that can apply to any industry. Master of Business Administration Courses and Topics GCU is a modern school that embraces a 21st century style of learning. With our online MBA program, you do not have to choose between your career and your education. Take courses online and take part in small group discussions in a diverse, online classroom. This degree requires a total of 46 credits. Most of the MBA online classes are eight weeks long. The core program courses include: Leadership and Organizations Accounting Practices Finance Principles Applied Business Probability and Statistics Marketing Management Managerial Accounting Operations Management You will also study quantitative tools and techniques, managerial finance, strategic management and economics. The coursework includes individual and group projects, case studies, theories and applications. Some of the core ideas you will examine include: Sustainability in the global marketplace Behaviors and techniques of efficient operations The use of economic data for smart decision-making Asset evaluation The program explores the management of working capital and the raising of funds in capital markets, as well as financial forecasting. Job Opportunities with an MBA The MBA is a respected degree that increases the capabilities and credibility of job applicants. You may decide to pursue your MBA shortly after graduating from a bachelor’s program. Or, you may apply when it becomes apparent that having an MBA may be a path toward pursuing a career as an executive or manager. Some examples of career paths that can stem from an MBA degree may include: Entrepreneur/founder Chief executive officer Vice president of operations Director of operations Business leaders are often expected to have an MBA. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, 79 percent of all employers surveyed expected to hire MBA graduates in 2017. A Master of Business Administration program can also open doors to future executives who are pursuing networking opportunities. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, of all companies surveyed that implement internship programs, 66 percent planned to offer these opportunities to MBA students in 2017. The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree will dramatically expand one’s knowledge of business and is the academic ticket to greater opportunities for employment, promotions, and income. The M.B.A. encapsulates complex business analyses, the effect of current events on the global business environment, multicultural influences on business decision-making, and examining the functional areas of business in addressing management decisions. The program includes courses in accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and data analytics. An M.B.A. offers a well-rounded foundation for a career in the corporate world or the education arena. It is vital that the student who wishes to pursue the M.B.A. seek a university that has earned the AACSB accreditation—as has MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business, an acknowledgement that the program has passed rigorous standards that evaluate faculty qualifications, curricula, missions and objectives, and other aspects that have created a high-quality business regimen. Students pursuing the M.B.A. program also may choose from three concentrations in Healthcare Management, Music Business or Concrete Industry Management. The latter is open only to those individuals who have considerable experience in the concrete industry and related fields. The M.B.A. is also available in a flexible, 100% online format. Learn more about the online M.B.A. program. Full-time MBA programs normally take place over two academic years (i.e. approximately 18 months of term time). For example, in the Northern Hemisphere they often begin in late August or early September of year one and continue until May or June of year two, with a three to four month summer break in between years one and two. Students enter with a reasonable amount of prior real-world work experience and take classes during weekdays like other university students. A typical full-time, accelerated, part-time, or modular MBA requires 60 credits (600 class hours) of graduate work.[25] Accelerated MBA programs are a variation of the two-year programs. They involve a higher course load with more intense class and examination schedules and are usually condensed into one year. They usually have less down time during the program and between semesters. For example, there is no three to four-month summer break, and between semesters there might be seven to ten days off rather than three to five weeks vacation. Accelerated programs typically have a lower cost than full-time two-year programs. Part-time MBA programs normally hold classes on weekday evenings after normal working hours, or on weekends. Part-time programs normally last three years or more. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who take a light course load for a longer period of time until the graduation requirements are met. Evening (second shift) MBA programs are full-time programs that normally hold classes on weekday evenings, after normal working hours, or on weekends for a duration of two years. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who can not leave their work to pursue a full-time regular shift MBA. Most second shift programs are offered at universities in India. Modular MBA programs are similar to part-time programs, although typically employing a lock-step curriculum with classes packaged together in blocks lasting from one to three weeks. Executive MBA (EMBA) programs developed to meet the educational needs of managers and executives, allowing students to earn an MBA (or another business-related graduate degree) in two years or less while working full-time. Participants come from every type and size of organization – profit, nonprofit, government – representing a variety of industries. EMBA students typically have a higher level of work experience, often 10 years or more, compared to other MBA students. In response to the increasing number of EMBA programs offered, The Executive MBA Council was formed in 1981 to advance executive education. Full-time executive MBA programs are a new category of full-time 1 year MBA programs aimed at professionals with approx. 5 years or more. They are primarily offered in countries like India where the 2-year MBA program is targeted at fresh graduates with no experience or minimal experience. These full-time executive MBA programs are similar to 1 year MBA programs offered by schools like Insead and IMD. Distance learning MBA programs hold classes off-campus. These programs can be offered in a number of different formats: correspondence courses by postal mail or email, non-interactive broadcast video, pre-recorded video, live teleconference or videoconference, offline or online computer courses. Many schools offer these programs. Blended learning programs combine distance learning with face-to-face instruction.[26] These programs typically target working professionals who are unable to attend traditional part-time programs.[27] MBA dual degree programs combine an MBA with others (such as an MS, MA, or a JD, etc.) to let students cut costs (dual programs usually cost less than pursuing 2 degrees separately), save time on education and to tailor the business education courses to their needs. This is generally achieved by allowing core courses of one program count as electives in the other. Some business schools offer programs in which students can earn both a bachelor's degree in business administration and an MBA in five years. Mini-MBA is a term used by many non-profit and for-profit institutions to describe a training regimen focused on the fundamentals of business. In the past, Mini-MBA programs have typically been offered as non-credit bearing courses that require less than 100 hours of total learning. However, due to the criticisms of these certificates, many schools have now shifted their programs to offer courses for full credit so that they may be applied towards a complete traditional MBA degree. This is to allow students to verify business related coursework for employment purposes and still allow the option to complete a full-time MBA degree program at a later period, if they elect to do so. Life insurance (or life assurance, especially in the Commonwealth of Nations) is a contract between an insurance policy holder and an insurer or assurer, where the insurer promises to pay a designated beneficiary a sum of money (the benefit) in exchange for a premium, upon the death of an insured person (often the policy holder). Depending on the contract, other events such as terminal illness or critical illness can also trigger payment. The policy holder typically pays a premium, either regularly or as one lump sum. Other expenses, such as funeral expenses, can also be included in the benefits. Life policies are legal contracts and the terms of the contract describe the limitations of the insured events. Specific exclusions are often written into the contract to limit the liability of the insurer; common examples are claims relating to suicide, fraud, war, riot, and civil commotion. Life-based contracts tend to fall into two major categories: Protection policies – designed to provide a benefit, typically a lump sum payment, in the event of a specified occurrence. A common form—more common in years past—of a protection policy design is term insurance. Investment policies – the main objective of these policies is to facilitate the growth of capital by regular or single premiums. Common forms (in the U.S.) are whole life, universal life, and variable life policies. Parties to contract The person responsible for making payments for a policy is the policy owner, while the insured is the person whose death will trigger payment of the death benefit. The owner and insured may or may not be the same person. For example, if Joe buys a policy on his own life, he is both the owner and the insured. But if Jane, his wife, buys a policy on Joe's life, she is the owner and he is the insured. The policy owner is the guarantor and he will be the person to pay for the policy. The insured is a participant in the contract, but not necessarily a party to it. Chart of a life insurance The beneficiary receives policy proceeds upon the insured person's death. The owner designates the beneficiary, but the beneficiary is not a party to the policy. The owner can change the beneficiary unless the policy has an irrevocable beneficiary designation. If a policy has an irrevocable beneficiary, any beneficiary changes, policy assignments, or cash value borrowing would require the agreement of the original beneficiary. In cases where the policy owner is not the insured (also referred to as the celui qui vit or CQV), insurance companies have sought to limit policy purchases to those with an insurable interest in the CQV. For life insurance policies, close family members and business partners will usually be found to have an insurable interest. The insurable interest requirement usually demonstrates that the purchaser will actually suffer some kind of loss if the CQV dies. Such a requirement prevents people from benefiting from the purchase of purely speculative policies on people they expect to die. With no insurable interest requirement, the risk that a purchaser would murder the CQV for insurance proceeds would be great. In at least one case, an insurance company which sold a policy to a purchaser with no insurable interest (who later murdered the CQV for the proceeds), was found liable in court for contributing to the wrongful death of the victim (Liberty National Life v. Weldon, 267 Ala.171 (1957)). Contract terms Special exclusions may apply, such as suicide clauses, whereby the policy becomes null and void if the insured commits suicide within a specified time (usually two years after the purchase date; some states provide a statutory one-year suicide clause). Any misrepresentations by the insured on the application may also be grounds for nullification. Most US states specify a maximum contestability period, often no more than two years. Only if the insured dies within this period will the insurer have a legal right to contest the claim on the basis of misrepresentation and request additional information before deciding whether to pay or deny the claim. The face amount of the policy is the initial amount that the policy will pay at the death of the insured or when the policy matures, although the actual death benefit can provide for greater or lesser than the face amount. The policy matures when the insured dies or reaches a specified age (such as 100 years old). Costs, insurability, and underwriting The insurance company calculates the policy prices (premiums) at a level sufficient to fund claims, cover administrative costs, and provide a profit. The cost of insurance is determined using mortality tables calculated by actuaries. Mortality tables are statistically based tables showing expected annual mortality rates of people at different ages. Put simply, people are more likely to die as they get older and the mortality tables enable the insurance companies to calculate the risk and increase premiums with age accordingly. Such estimates can be important in taxation regulation.[8][9] In the 1980s and 1990s, the SOA 1975–80 Basic Select & Ultimate tables were the typical reference points, while the 2001 VBT and 2001 CSO tables were published more recently. As well as the basic parameters of age and gender, the newer tables include separate mortality tables for smokers and non-smokers, and the CSO tables include separate tables for preferred classes.[10] The mortality tables provide a baseline for the cost of insurance, but the health and family history of the individual applicant is also taken into account (except in the case of Group policies). This investigation and resulting evaluation is termed underwriting. Health and lifestyle questions are asked, with certain responses possibly meriting further investigation. Specific factors that may be considered by underwriters include: Personal medical history[11] Family medical history[12] Driving record[13] Height and weight matrix, otherwise known as BMI (Body Mass Index)[14] Based on the above and additional factors, applicants will be placed into one of several classes of health ratings which will determine the premium paid in exchange for insurance at that particular carrier.[13] Life insurance companies in the United States support the Medical Information Bureau (MIB),[15] which is a clearing house of information on persons who have applied for life insurance with participating companies in the last seven years. As part of the application, the insurer often requires the applicant's permission to obtain information from their physicians.[16] Automated Life Underwriting is a technology solution which is designed to perform all or some of the screening functions traditionally completed by underwriters, and thus seeks to reduce the work effort, time and/or data necessary to underwrite a life insurance application.[17] These systems allow point of sale distribution and can shorten the time frame for issuance from weeks or even months to hours or minutes, depending on the amount of insurance being purchased.[18] The mortality of underwritten persons rises much more quickly than the general population. At the end of 10 years, the mortality of that 25-year-old, non-smoking male is 0.66/1000/year. Consequently, in a group of one thousand 25-year-old males with a $100,000 policy, all of average health, a life insurance company would have to collect approximately $50 a year from each participant to cover the relatively few expected claims. (0.35 to 0.66 expected deaths in each year × $100,000 payout per death = $35 per policy.) Other costs, such as administrative and sales expenses, also need to be considered when setting the premiums. A 10-year policy for a 25-year-old non-smoking male with preferred medical history may get offers as low as $90 per year for a $100,000 policy in the competitive US life insurance market. Most of the revenue received by insurance companies consists of premiums, but revenue from investing the premiums forms an important source of profit for most life insurance companies. Group Insurance policies are an exception to this. In the United States, life insurance companies are never legally required to provide coverage to everyone, with the exception of Civil Rights Act compliance requirements. Insurance companies alone determine insurability, and some people are deemed uninsurable. The policy can be declined or rated (increasing the premium amount to compensate for the higher risk), and the amount of the premium will be proportional to the face value of the policy. Many companies separate applicants into four general categories. These categories are preferred best, preferred, standard, and tobacco. Preferred best is reserved only for the healthiest individuals in the general population. This may mean, that the proposed insured has no adverse medical history, is not under medication, and has no family history of early-onset cancer, diabetes, or other conditions.[19] Preferred means that the proposed insured is currently under medication and has a family history of particular illnesses. Most people are in the standard category. People in the tobacco category typically have to pay higher premiums due to the higher mortality. Recent US mortality tables predict that roughly 0.35 in 1,000 non-smoking males aged 25 will die during the first year of a policy.[20] Mortality approximately doubles for every extra ten years of age, so the mortality rate in the first year for non-smoking men is about 2.5 in 1,000 people at age 65.[20] Compare this with the US population male mortality rates of 1.3 per 1,000 at age 25 and 19.3 at age 65 (without regard to health or smoking status).[21] Death proceeds Upon the insured's death, the insurer requires acceptable proof of death before it pays the claim. The normal minimum proof required is a death certificate, and the insurer's claim form completed, signed, and typically notarized.[citation needed] If the insured's death is suspicious and the policy amount is large, the insurer may investigate the circumstances surrounding the death before deciding whether it has an obligation to pay the claim. Payment from the policy may be as a lump sum or as an annuity, which is paid in regular installments for either a specified period or for the beneficiary's lifetime.[22] Insurance vs assurance The specific uses of the terms "insurance" and "assurance" are sometimes confused. In general, in jurisdictions where both terms are used, "insurance" refers to providing coverage for an event that might happen (fire, theft, flood, etc.), while "assurance" is the provision of coverage for an event that is certain to happen. In the United States, both forms of coverage are called "insurance" for reasons of simplicity in companies selling both products.[citation needed] By some definitions, "insurance" is any coverage that determines benefits based on actual losses whereas "assurance" is coverage with predetermined benefits irrespective of the losses incurred. Life insurance may be divided into two basic classes: temporary and permanent; or the following subclasses: term, universal, whole life, and endowment life insurance. Term insurance Main article: Term life insurance Term assurance provides life insurance coverage for a specified term. The policy does not accumulate cash value. Term insurance is significantly less expensive than an equivalent permanent policy but will become higher with age. Policy holders can save to provide for increased term premiums or decrease insurance needs (by paying off debts or saving to provide for survivor needs).[23] Mortgage life insurance insures a loan secured by real property and usually features a level premium amount for a declining policy face value because what is insured is the principal and interest outstanding on a mortgage that is constantly being reduced by mortgage payments. The face amount of the policy is always the amount of the principal and interest outstanding that are paid should the applicant die before the final installment is paid. Group life insurance Group life insurance (also known as wholesale life insurance or institutional life insurance) is term insurance covering a group of people, usually employees of a company, members of a union or association, or members of a pension or superannuation fund. Individual proof of insurability is not normally a consideration in its underwriting. Rather, the underwriter considers the size, turnover, and financial strength of the group. Contract provisions will attempt to exclude the possibility of adverse selection. Group life insurance often allows members exiting the group to maintain their coverage by buying individual coverage. The underwriting is carried out for the whole group instead of individuals. Permanent life insurance Permanent life insurance is life insurance that covers the remaining lifetime of the insured. A permanent insurance policy accumulates a cash value up to its date of maturation. The owner can access the money in the cash value by withdrawing money, borrowing the cash value, or surrendering the policy and receiving the surrender value. The three basic types of permanent insurance are whole life, universal life, and endowment. Whole life Main article: Whole life insurance Whole life insurance provides lifetime coverage for a set premium amount (see main article for a full explanation of the many variations and options). Universal life coverage Universal life insurance (ULl) is a relatively new insurance product, intended to combine permanent insurance coverage with greater flexibility in premium payments, along with the potential for greater growth of cash values. There are several types of universal life insurance policies, including interest-sensitive (also known as "traditional fixed universal life insurance"), variable universal life (VUL), guaranteed death benefit, and has equity-indexed universal life insurance. Universal life insurance policies have cash values. Paid-in premiums increase their cash values; administrative and other costs reduce their cash values. Universal life insurance addresses the perceived disadvantages of whole life—namely that premiums and death benefits are fixed. With universal life, both the premiums and death benefit are flexible. With the exception of guaranteed-death-benefit universal life policies, universal life policies trade their greater flexibility off for fewer guarantees. "Flexible death benefit" means the policy owner can choose to decrease the death benefit. The death benefit can also be increased by the policy owner, usually requiring new underwriting. Another feature of flexible death benefit is the ability to choose option A or option B death benefits and to change those options over the course of the life of the insured. Option A is often referred to as a "level death benefit"; death benefits remain level for the life of the insured, and premiums are lower than policies with Option B death benefits, which pay the policy's cash value—i.e., a face amount plus earnings/interest. If the cash value grows over time, the death benefits do too. If the cash value declines, the death benefit also declines. Option B policies normally feature higher premiums than option A policies. Endowments Main article: Endowment policy The endowment policy is a life insurance contract designed to pay a lump sum after a specific term (on its 'maturity') or on death. Typical maturities are ten, fifteen or twenty years up to a certain age limit. Some policies also pay out in the case of critical illness. Policies are typically traditional with-profits or unit-linked (including those with unitized with-profits funds). Endowments can be cashed in early (or surrendered) and the holder then receives the surrender value which is determined by the insurance company depending on how long the policy has been running and how much has been paid into it. Accidental death Accidental death insurance is a type of limited life insurance that is designed to cover the insured should they die as the result of an accident. "Accidents" run the gamut from abrasions to catastrophes but normally do not include deaths resulting from non-accident-related health problems or suicide. Because they only cover accidents, these policies are much less expensive than other life insurance policies. Such insurance can also be accidental death and dismemberment insurance or AD&D. In an AD&D policy, benefits are available not only for accidental death but also for the loss of limbs or body functions such as sight and hearing. Accidental death and AD&D policies very rarely pay a benefit, either because the cause of death is not covered by the policy or because death occurs well after the accident, by which time the premiums have gone unpaid. To know what coverage they have, insureds should always review their policies. Risky activities such as parachuting, flying, professional sports, or military service are often omitted from coverage. Accidental death insurance can also supplement standard life insurance as a rider. If a rider is purchased, the policy generally pays double the face amount if the insured dies from an accident. This was once called double indemnity insurance. In some cases, triple indemnity coverage may be available. Senior and pre-need products Insurance companies have in recent years developed products for niche markets, most notably targeting seniors in an aging population. These are often low to moderate face value whole life insurance policies, allowing senior citizens to purchase affordable insurance later in life. This may also be marketed as final expense insurance and usually have death benefits between $2,000 and $40,000. One reason for their popularity is that they only require answers to simple "yes" or "no" questions, while most policies require a medical exam to qualify. As with other policy types, the range of premiums can vary widely and should be scrutinized prior to purchase, as should the reliability of the companies. Health questions can vary substantially between exam and no-exam policies. It may be possible for individuals with certain conditions to qualify for one type of coverage and not another.[citation needed] Because seniors sometimes are not fully aware of the policy provisions it is important to make sure that policies last for a lifetime and that premiums do not increase every 5 years as is common in some circumstances.[citation needed] Pre-need life insurance policies are limited premium payment, whole life policies that are usually purchased by older applicants, though they are available to everyone. This type of insurance is designed to cover specific funeral expenses that the applicant has designated in a contract with a funeral home. The policy's death benefit is initially based on the funeral cost at the time of prearrangement, and it then typically grows as interest is credited. In exchange for the policy owner's designation, the funeral home typically guarantees that the proceeds will cover the cost of the funeral, no matter when death occurs. Excess proceeds may go either to the insured's estate, a designated beneficiary, or the funeral home as set forth in the contract. Purchasers of these policies usually make a single premium payment at the time of prearrangement, but some companies also allow premiums to be paid over as much as ten years. A LEADER IN ATTORNEY, COPY & MESSENGER SERVICES For over two decades, Advanced Attorney Services, Inc. has been a leading Attorney, Copy and Messenger services provider in Southern California. With a wide range of business solutions offered, Advanced is committed to superior service standards by providing our clients with new and innovative methods of operating to ensure the highest quality of services available at competitive rates. If your firm is in need of immediate or same day court service, process service, deposition services, writ services, fax filings, E-Filings, messenger, on or off-site copy services, as well as a wide range of other services, allow Advanced Attorney Services to get the job done right.A lawyer referral service maintains a network of lawyers, and connects people in need of lawyers with its participating attorneys. A potential client who contacts a lawyer referral service is directed to a lawyer who practices in the area of law that is most appropriate for their situation. Some lawyer referral services charge a fee for providing a referral, while others provide referrals at no cost to the prospective client. Many referral services connect prospective clients with lawyers who have agreed to provide a low-cost or free initial consultation.[1] Referral services are often provided by state and local bar associations as a public service. Referral services may also be offered by non-profit organizations and advocacy groups. For-profit referral services[1] may connect lawyers with clients who pay a membership fee, or a fee for successfully referred clients, subject to rules against sharing fees with non-lawyers.[2] Historically, lawyer referral services involved prospective clients contacting a bar association or responding to an advertisement, by placing a telephone call to the service and seeking a referral. [3] With the internet boom in the 1990s, many consumers turned to the web to search for goods and services.[4] A research study released in 2012, shows that 76 percent of adult consumers looking for a lawyer used online resources at some point during the search process.[5]Some referral services provide referrals to lawyers in a broad range of areas of legal practice. Others may focus on referrals within a narrow range of practice areas, or a single practice area.[6] Online lawyer referral services are sometimes called attorney-client matching services. People who contact a service may be matched with one or more attorneys, based upon such factors as area of legal practice and geographic location. Lawyers who participate in these services may pay a fee for participation, a fee for each referral, or in some cases a percentage of the amount charged to a referred client.[7] In some cases the prospective client will be able to choose from a list of referred attorneys, while in other cases the referral will be made to a specific participating lawyer.[8] If a client is unable to afford a lawyer and the legal problem is not a matter that can be handled by a lawyer on a percentage fee basis, some referral services may attempt to match the client with a pro bono lawyer, or direct the client to contact a legal aid organization or law student clinic for help.[9] Ethical issues may arise for lawyers who participate in for-profit referral services, and state rules governing participation can vary significantly.[10][11][12] Some referral services are certified by bar associations,[13] including the American Bar Association.[14] Certified referral services must maintain standards of service as defined by the certifying organization. Among those standards, certification may require that participating lawyers meet minimum standards of experience, or maintain legal malpractice insurance. The American Bar Association provides a list attorney referral services that meet its certification requirements.[15] Some legal associations have expressed concern that lawyer referral services can lead to lawyers trying to undercut each other to get clients, rather than focusing on quality of service and the development of their reputation among their peers.[16] Another concern about lawyer referral services relates to client confidentiality. When a prospective client contacts a lawyer directly about retaining the lawyer's services, the communication is normally held absolutely confidential under principles of attorney-client privilege. Where a lawyer referral service collects information from a person who is seeking a lawyer, that information will not normally be confidential, raising the possibility that information provided to the referral service will be discoverable by the opposing party in any subsequent litigation.[17] Lawyer referral services may have minimal requirements for participation, and in some cases may not do any verification of a lawyer's qualification or credentials. As a consequence, it remains necessary for a person who uses a referral service to investigate a lawyer's qualification before retaining the lawyer.[7] Some controversy also arises from whether professional referral services are anti-competitive in nature.[citation needed] For instance, since Board Certified attorneys often charge a higher hourly rate than other competent general practitioners, if a Lawyer Referral Service requires Board Certification for certain types of referrals, instead of merely providing the public a choice between a Board Certified attorney and a competent attorney who is not Board Certified, the effect may be to restrict competition and restrict public choice and push up consumer prices.[citation needed] State bars, which license attorneys, may be complicit in restricting client choice.[citation needed] 5 Types of Insurance You Need, and 4 Types of Policies You Don’t Posted by Miranda Marquit Last updated on May 24, 2019 | Insurance Advertiser Disclosure: Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any other entity. This site may be compensated through the advertiser Affiliate Program. [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Insurance is an interesting industry. It is there to protect you, but it sometimes seems like a huge waste of resources if you don’t end up needing it. Of course, if you do end up with a serious problem, not having insurance could take an already difficult situation and turn it into a financial catastrophe. While you don’t need to insure against everything, there are a few insurance policies that you should have. The key is to recognize which insurance policies are the most essential to protect yourself and find a way to incorporate them into your budget. Not doing so is a gamble which can have a devastating financial impact if something happens. Table of Contents 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need 1. Auto Insurance 2. Life Insurance 3. Home/Rental Insurance 4. Health Insurance 5. Disability Insurance 6. Travel Insurance 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need 1. Life Insurance for Children 2. Mortgage Life Insurance 3. Credit Card Insurance 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need These are the types of insurance you need to insure against the largest threats to your budget in the event of an unexpected disaster: 1. Auto Insurance If you have a car, you need auto insurance – and not only because every state law requires that you carry it. For many people, their car is their only way to get to work; if it becomes un-drivable due to an accident, and the money isn’t available to buy a new one, it can be hard to earn a living. Additionally, if you are at fault in an accident, the liability you have could become very expensive. Your auto insurance policy may pay medical bills and property damage so that you wouldn’t be forced to come up with the money out of pocket, possibly resulting in financial ruin. The good news is auto insurance is a competitive industry. You can easily compare rates with different car insurance companies to find the best deal in your area. 2. Life Insurance Life insurance is probably the most important insurance policy you will ever purchase. It protects your loved ones by providing income for them in the event you pass on. It can also be a good idea to insure your life, even if you aren’t the primary breadwinner. After all, the duties of a stay-at-home spouse are worth quite a bit. Though you may not pay a stay-at-home spouse a salary, it would be expensive to replace everything they do to run the household. Consider your needs, and make sure that you have adequate life insurance. There are also other forms of life insurance such as Mortgage Life Insurance, check out our post on the pros and cons for your reference! 3. Home/Rental Insurance Your home represents a huge, expensive asset. If it’s damaged, it’ll cost you, big time. And depending on how bad the damage is, you might not be able to live there while repairs are being made. Depending on your policy, homeowners insurance can help you pay for home repairs, short-term lodging, or even a new home . . . without a huge outlay of capital all at once. Rental insurance is also a good idea, since the landlord’s property insurance usually only covers the structure and land, but not the contents of the rental property. Thankfully, rental insurance is usually very affordable, sometimes as low as $10 a month. At that price, you can’t afford to skip it. With whichever option you need you can get instant online quotes through Lemonade. They are changing the homeowners/renters insurance market with low instant rates. Get homeowners/renters insurance rates with Lemonade>> 4. Health Insurance If you are uninsured, you may be one hospital stay away from bankruptcy. Health insurance will help you offset some of the rising costs of health care – at least when it comes to large health needs. If you have a chronic condition, health insurance can help you better afford the care you need. Even if you are in good health, and rarely use health care services, it can be a good idea to at least have a policy that covers major medical problems, just in case an accident befalls you. Get Health Insurance Rates >> 5. Disability Insurance Statistics show that 1 in 4 people will become disabled at some point before they retire. Even though this statistic includes people who receive short term disability, it is an astounding number. This makes us ask the question, “Can I afford a short term or long term disability?” Is your emergency fund large enough to sustain no income for a month? What about two months, or three months, or six months? The average monthly benefit paid by Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is $1,065 per month. Will that be enough to support your family? Disability insurance can help cover the unknown situations, and it can be a good idea, especially if you are the primary breadwinner in your household or work in a high-risk industry. Should you have an injury that qualifies for your policy, your disability insurance will pay you while you are unable to work. Disability insurance policies often vary substantially between providers, so be sure to thoroughly review your policy to understand which situations qualify for benefits, how and when you qualify for payments, how much you will receive, etc. Typically, there is a waiting period of up to 30 days or longer before disability benefits kick in, so it is always good to have an emergency fund in place so you can have something to live on in the meantime. 6. Travel Insurance Yes, you may want to consider travel insurance, especially in certain situations. For example, let’s say you plan the trip of your lifetime, and you go all out, virtually without regard to your budget (which is extreme, I know). You may not want to have to worry about spending tens of thousands of dollars and have something come up with ruins the whole deal. For a small fee, you can hedge your bets here. Of course, if you’re planning a little weekend trip and making your travel by car, you might want to pass up any extra costs. 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need In one of my favorite episodes of the television show Family Guy, a slick door-to-door salesman convinces the bumbling Peter to purchase volcano insurance. When Peter first suggests that they’d never had volcano trouble in Rhode Island, the salesman responds “Don’t you think we’re due for one?” which of course ensures his sale. Even though it would take effort to be as naïve as Peter, there are definitely times when it’s difficult to know if the insurance you are considering is worth your money, or if it’s just another example of volcano insurance. Here are four insurance policies that you can feel comfortable skipping: 1. Life Insurance for Children The traditional purpose of life insurance is to financially provide for your family in the case of premature death. Since your children are not contributing financially to the family, and will most likely grow up to be safe and healthy, paying into premiums for their life insurance does not make sense. The money you would spend on premiums would be better spent in an emergency fund, a 529 plan for their education, or in an IRA. Exceptions: There are times when a life insurance policy for makes sense for children. This includes when your child earns an income and contributes to the family, or when you can get a very inexpensive rider on your life insurance policy. Otherwise, you may be better off skipping the life insurance policy for your children. 2. Mortgage Life Insurance On the surface, this seems like a reasonable policy. This insurance will pay off your mortgage in the event of your death, giving your family one less financial headache during a stressful time. However, a good life insurance policy should provide your heirs with enough money to handle the mortgage and any other bills that they will have to pay. There’s no need to purchase a separate policy for this—just make sure that your life insurance is adequate to cover your family’s needs. (caveat: mortgage life insurance can be a good idea if you have preexisting conditions and are ineligible for a term life insurance policy; otherwise, term is the way to go). 3. Credit Card Insurance For those who carry a balance on their credit card, having a policy that will pay your credit card bill in the event that you are unable to do so seems like a smart plan. The benefits of these plans are relatively limited, however, meaning you’re paying a monthly premium only to have your benefits capped and still be in debt. It makes much more sense to send the amount of the premium toward your bill and try to get your credit card paid off. You’ll save money on interest in addition to avoiding having to pay another bill. 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance The sad fact of the matter is that many medical insurance policies have holes in their coverage. Because of that, specific disease insurance policies—and specifically cancer insurance—have become popular over the past few years to take care of the gaps in regular medical coverage. The problem with these types of insurance is that they are so specific, and they do not necessarily cover everything related to the disease. For example, many cancer insurance policies do not cover skin cancers, which are the most common form of the disease. A better use of your money would be to upgrade your current health insurance. That way you’re covered no matter what happens. When it comes to insurance, always make sure you take the time to do some research into what you need and what will be covered before you sign on the dotted line. And beware volcano insurance salesmen! [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Are there other types of insurance people need (or should at least consider)? Leave a comment with your thoughts! Supply and Variable Charges No matter which tariff structure you select, your bill is usually divided into supply and variable charges. The supply charge is unaffected by your energy consumption. It is listed on your bill as a “supply charge” or “service charge,” and refers to a daily charge you receive regardless of how much energy you use. The supply charge is the charge you receive for being connected to the energy grid. Some suppliers offer discounts on the supply charge, which benefits households that don’t use very much energy. The second charge on your bill is a variable charge. Most of the time this appears as a “usage charge” on your bill. For electricity, suppliers charge based on cents per kilowatt hour (kWh). Most suppliers offer discounts on usage charges, which are usually the largest portion of your bill. Peak and Controlled Load Usage Peak and controlled load peak usage hours are two of the terms you’ll see a lot when looking at electricity consumption. They may appear on your bill whether or not your plan even includes peak and controlled load hours for billing purposes. Not all plans use peak and controlled load rates. Most suppliers allow you to select a single-rate tariff or a time of use tariff. The latter option takes peak usage into account. Single Rate Tariff A single rate tariff charges you the same amount for your energy consumption, regardless of the time of day you use the most energy. These plans are good for those who use the bulk of their electricity during peak hours. In contrast, a time of use plan charges higher rates during peak hours, so you’ll pay more for the energy you use during these times. Your electricity bill may still say ‘general usage’ even if you have a single rate tariff. In this case you’re not being charged more, it’s simply how the energy supplier categorises your energy use. Time of Use Tariff The time of use tariff divides the day into peak hours and controlled load hours. Peak hours vary depending on your supplier and your plan, but tend to be during times when more people are using electricity. For example, weekday afternoons and early evenings are likely to be peak times. Electricity usage is cheaper during controlled load hours and more expensive during peak times. Time of use plans tend to be better for those who use most of their energy in the morning or at night. If it’s feasible to do so, you could save money by waiting to use more electricity during controlled load hours. Block Pricing Your electricity supplier may charge you using block pricing. In this tariff type, your usage is broken into two or more blocks of kilowatt hours. Your supplier charges the first energy block at one rate. After you exceed the specified limit, you move into the second block and are charged a different rate. Some suppliers charge a lower rate for the first block and increase the rate for subsequent blocks, while other suppliers do the opposite. The majority of energy suppliers use two blocks for pricing, but some go as high as five. Block pricing can save you money if you can access a pricing model that suits your usage. Smaller households that don’t use much electricity may be able to stay within the first block and pay a lower rate. Larger households that use high amounts of electricity could benefit from block pricing that starts at a higher rate and decreases as usage goes up. A controlled load tariff is one of the more obscure tariffs you can find through electricity suppliers. It’s worth considering controlled load tariffs, because they could save you money. With a controlled load tariff, you are charged separately for the electricity used to power a specific appliance such as hot water or slab heating. The controlled load appliance runs on a separate circuit than the rest of your home, and may have its own meter. The supplier charges one rate for your normal electricity usage, and a different rate for the controlled load. The catch to controlled load tariffs is that the appliance can only be used during a specified time frame. In New South Wales and Queensland you can choose between controlled load one and controlled load 2: the first option is cheaper, but the second operates under a longer time frame. Controlled load tariffs are designed for appliances that don’t need to run continuously, which is why they work well for hot water systems. Can a Controlled Load Tariff Save You Money? Some suppliers, however, provide discounts with no strings attached. Weigh up these discounts carefully when making your decision. The amount of money you save will also depend on a few factors. Your location and the supplier’s rate will determine whether or not it’s worth separating one or two of your major appliances on a controlled load. To access a controlled load tariff, customers will typically need to make arrangements with their electricity provider. Mortgage rates are continuing their downward spiral. According to Freddie Mac, the average rate on a 30-year fixed-rate loan has dropped to just 3.82%—down from 4.54% last June and its lowest point in nearly two years. The dip presents a prime opportunity for buyers and existing homeowners alike. For those looking to get out of the rent race, it means the most affordable interest rates since September 2017. As Vishal Garg, CEO of digital mortgage lender Better.com, explains, “Now is the most opportune time to get a loan. If you’re renting, you’re simply paying your landlord’s mortgage.” For those who already own a home, the rate drop could mean serious financial savings over time. In fact, according to data and analytics firm Black Knight, nearly every mortgage loan originated in 2018 could see a rate drop via refinancing. In total, a whopping 6.8 million homeowners could now qualify for a refinance and save at least 75 basis points—or around $268 per month. Less than two months ago, just 2 million homeowners could see these kinds of savings. Still, it’s not all about the rate. Refinance-eligible homeowners also have a chance to leverage their home equity. As Garg says, it’s “a rare opportunity for Americans to improve their financial health.” “If you have any other type of debt—car loan, credit card, student loan—and you own a home, you can tap into the equity of your home to pay off these other higher-interest loans,” Garg said. But experts caution that Freddie Mac’s average rate is just that—an average. Rates vary greatly from lender to lender, and a borrower's credit, debts and other factors all play a role in mortgage rates as well. In order to get the best rate possible, Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist Sam Khafer says shopping around is key. “While the drop in mortgage rates is a good opportunity for consumers to save on their mortgage payment, our research indicates that there can be a wide dispersion among mortgage rate offers,” he said. Khater estimates the average buyer can save around $1,500 up front by getting just one additional mortgage quote. Over the life of a 30-year loan, shopping around can save buyers more than $44,000, according to LendingTree's most recent Mortgage Comparison Shopping Report. That is both an easy and complex question, so let's do easy first: As a rule, in the United States the terms lawyer and attorney are interchangeable. Now for the hard answer. It's hard because we have to go back a bit in history to understand the distinctions. The term "lawyer" was generally used to refer to any person who has studied and been trained in the law. The lawyers of the early U.S. nationhood are a good example. Someone like John Adams or Thomas Jefferson were not only leaders of the American Revolution but they also were lawyers. An interesting note on Adams's career is that he actually provided a learned, principled, and successful defense of the British soldiers accused of crimes arising from the Boston Massacre. His reason was the same that many criminal defense attorneys cite today for their own careers. Every person, no matter how they are seen by the general public, deserves a zealous and competent defense (something we now find in the Sixth Amendment of the Constitution). As education in the U.S. improved and law began to become its own discipline, the term "attorney at law" (also attorney-at-law) was created around 1768. For a short time there was an effort to distinguish the two terms. The lawyer was one who studied and graduated after studying law, however, they were not necessarily seen as someone who had passed the bar; therefore they did not "practice law" before a court. Even today we see that one can graduate from an American law school, thus becoming a lawyer, but not pass the bar exam. Without the passing score on the bar exam, one can't be admitted to practice law in the jurisdiction (state or federal). The attorney at law, which was later shortened to just attorney, was used in some instances to mean a professional who is qualified to give legal advice and to represent a party in court. Eventually, the early form of the law degree (which was considered a professional degree much like that for the ministry or medicine) evolved to a point that it would require a much higher level of education in order to be reasonably qualified. Today, the terms attorney and lawyer are used interchangeably, mostly because the need to distinguish the right to practice law became so well defined with the expansion of the individual jurisdictions judicial system and also because the qualifying degree today to sit for the bar exam is a professional doctorate degree; usually the Juris Doctorate or J.D. There are still those who graduate from law school but never sit for the bar exam. The law degree is an excellent degree which can be used in many areas of business and government work other than the practice of law. Thus, the concept that one is a lawyer by virtue of the law degree still exists, it is just not enforced as enthusiastically as in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

SANTO DOMINGO – Moradores del sector de Gualey en Santo Domingo Distrito Nacional Tomaron la ” Justicia por las Manos “ contra un antisocial de Nombre Aneuris Arias, en un hecho sucedido en el sector de Gualey.

El delincuente es reincidente en atracos y violaciones a mujeres que se dirigían a sus trabajos en horas tempranas de la mañana.

one of the most useful postgraduate degrees an international student can earn is a Master of Business Administration (MBA). This degree opens many doors regarding your employment, or any business endeavors you wish to pursue. MBAs are available to students who have already earned a bachelor's degree. Whatever your reason for considering earning an MBA, you’re going to want to begin the process having answered some key questions: What is an MBA? Why earn an MBA? How can an MBA benefit your career? How do you begin? What is an MBA? The MBA degree is widely believed to be one of the most prestigious and sought-after degrees in the world. Students of MBA programs study the theory and application of business and management principles. This type of study equips students with knowledge that can be applied to a variety of real-world business industries and situations.​ Why earn an MBA? Students may ask, what is an MBA for? In today's fast-paced economy, the MBA is the most popular professional degree around the world. The program blends advanced skills in business and management with real-world experience to prepare graduates for starting or advancing in a management career in any field they choose. In many cases, an MBA degree is required for executive and senior management positions. There are some companies who will not even consider applicants unless they have an MBA degree. Business school professors say MBA programs help students develop the skills required to excel as business executives, such as the ability to quickly and accurately analyze large amounts of information and the ability to develop smart solutions to business problems. How can an MBA benefit your career? Some of the reasons and benefits include: Advancing your career - This can mean a number of different things. In a circumstance where you have worked with a company and earned an MBA later on in your employment with them, you can leverage your position into a more prominent role. The best way to do so would be to keep an eye for in-house promotions that you could see yourself advancing to and being prepared to apply for it with your new credentials. An MBA is highly esteemed in nearly any industry and will often fast track you to better opportunities. Developing your business savvy - Your MBA will help in growing your professional network. You will come across many opportunities to connect with other MBAs and companies seeking to work with an MBA graduate. Utilizing the skills you learn from having an MBA will be invaluable in helping you with job security. Your degree will often make you an indispensable team member. Leading in an emerging field - Often these days, knowing an industry versus knowing how to maneuver in that industry with expertise will be the quality employers will seek. Many people can be taught how to work in specific industries, but not everyone will have the capacity to lead in said industries. Equipped with your MBA, you will likely be a frontrunner in any leading role in a field that is still budding. Starting your own business - Becoming an entrepreneur might be one of the most popular reasons to earn an MBA. To excel as an entrepreneur, you’ll need to learn to communicate effectively and persuasively. For many people, these skills don’t come naturally, but now more than ever, business schools have come to realize how critical it is for their students to graduate with the personal skills required for effective leadership. Business school is also the safest place to test out your most creative, outrageous, and ambitious ideas without the pressure and fear of failure if that company or those ideas don't work. You'll have teachers and mentors guiding you along the way as you search for your big idea. How do you begin? You’ll want to begin by choosing a school. When searching for a college or university in the US to pursue an MBA, here are a few things to consider: A good place to start is program length. There are a few options on what to pursue and how when it comes to an MBA. Full-time MBA programs in the US typically take two years to complete, but many programs also have one-year, accelerated options. Part-time MBA programs allow the flexibility of attending evening and/or weekend classes to accommodate to life’s busy schedule. Accelerated MBA programs are another recent addition to the MBA in the US offerings. Targeted at students with a background in business education (or the ability to make up for lost time through self-study), accelerated MBA programs in the US can take anywhere from 12-18 months to complete. Because of their emphasis on speed they spend considerably less time reviewing introductory material and eliminate many opportunities for degree specialization. Your options are plentiful, but many people will consider rankings and student satisfaction when choosing a school. Schools throughout the US such as Auburn University in Alabama, American University in Washington, DC, Emory University in Georgia, or Purdue University in Indiana that are ranked in the top 100 schools for MBAs are good ones to consider. Once you find an MBA program you want to... Begin the application process. There are actually three stages to the admissions cycle: pre-application, application, and post-application. Some business schools also give prospective MBAs three different application deadlines by separating the admissions season into rounds. Being aware of when each round occurs lets prospective students know when to complete the GMAT, get letters of recommendation, and prepare all other material required for admissions. If you have the chance to interview for programs where there’s the option to do so, be sure to take advantage. Like most application processes your resume, recommendations, and a completed application are required. Beyond the standard, an MBA application will include essays, transcripts, and GMAT scores. The goal for applicants is to present a strong application across all the evaluation materials. The stronger each element of the application is the higher the chance of being admitted in an MBA program in the USA. Most American business schools-regardless of the major focus-will train you in the principles of general business management. These principles include a combination of accounting, economics, finance, marketing and statistics, among other topics. American universities also offer a wealth of specialized M.B.A. programs and classes to tailor your degree. Depending on your intended career goals, you'll find programs that offer a more focused approach, including business administration, finance, human resources, information technology, marketing, nonprofit administration, and more. THEORY IN PRACTICE At every level, the American higher education system is different. Foundational principles and theories must be taught, but they are only mastered through practice. MBA programs in the United States strongly reflect this teaching philosophy. You will examine real-world case studies and business scenarios in order to devise strategies, business plans, budgets, etc. These types of projects will prepare you for real-life business situations and to approach them with practical knowledge. “In logistics management class, we had case studies to discuss: Ford company, HP, Ralph Lauren, and so on. We assumed that we were managers and analyzed the problems and solutions. We applied strategies that we learned from the textbook to solve problems. This is a very good part,” explains Boonpa Ing-Anuraksakul, from Thailand, studying Logistics Management at Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno, Nevada. The majority of MBA programs will have an internship requirement. Internships are an excellent way to really explore your future career and apply your studies. The companies for which you intern are thriving businesses and you will be working in a fast-paced environment. They will have professional expectations of you. While internships provide you with a practical learning environment, they are a prime setting for networking. Networking is one of the most powerful tools for your career. While you are an intern, take advantage of the opportunity to meet and network with current professionals. They may help you get a job or be your future colleagues. “An internship is a requirement in my curriculum. I believe this is helpful because the college encourages students to apply the skills outside the classroom and develop experience in the real world before graduating,” says Heejoong Kim, from Korea, studying Management and Marketing at Loyola University New Orleans. An internship will not only give you valuable experience, you will find that having a reputable American company listed on your resume will be invaluable. “When I graduate with my MBA, I will be competing in a very global job market. Having experience interacting with people from different cultures I believe will give me an edge in the professional world,” stated Juri Adrianto, from Indonesia, an MBA student in Information Systems at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Supply chain management is one of the fastest growing business specialties across the globe. The Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas has created a Supply chain management department where MBA students specialize in this popular career. In fact, the majority of international students in the Walton MBA choose to specialize in Supply Chain due to the quickly expanding global job market in the field and the international reputation of the faculty. MBA Supply Chain majors study subjects such as modeling, forecasting, transportation strategies and global logistics.The Walton College MBA program also allows them to customize the program with special workshops such as Negotiation Skills, Networking, RFID technologies and Advanced Access. The program also provides one-on-one personal coaching in resume writing, job interview skills, salary negotiations and how to create the best first impression. FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY A one-year accelerated MBA with a concentration in Global Business attracts students from around the world to Fairleigh Dickinson University, near New York City, because of its focus on managing a multinational workforce and expanding into global markets. Having met the highest standards, the program is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The MBA program features a curriculum that covers the models, theories, concepts and practices that successful organizations utilize to gain a competitive advantage within the framework of the global economy. Concepts are brought to reality for students, with structured corporate visits and a 10-day overseas business trip. LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS Loyola University New Orleans M.B.A. program prepares students to become leaders in both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in the increasingly global marketplace. The program is extremely flexible with student's schedules, allowing them to attend either full-time or part-time. Students are given advanced training in courses, such as: Leadership Dynamics, Ethical and Legal Responsibility, Advanced Financial Management, Global Supply Chain Management, Management Control and Decision-Making and Total Global Strategy. Partnerships with local businesses allow M.B.A. students to apply their studies outside of the classroom. Recently, the Entrepreneurial Consulting class partnered with the South Coast Angel Fund. Students' research and due diligence produced a $500K investment in a Social Media startup company. It’s time to take the next step in your professional life. Either your work experience, bachelor’s degree or career interests have all gathered together to show you what your next step in life is: your MBA. Doing a Master’s in Business Administration is a great way to direct your career into success, knowing that in most jobs having the MBA degree gets you ahead of the game. Today, there are more than 450 universities in the United States that offer MBA programs, and EduBookings can help you get admitted into hundreds of them and help you choose the top MBA colleges in America. Dozens of concentrations are also offered in many of the Business Schools, opening a world of opportunities to students. EduBookings works with over 120 universities in the United States, offering competitive and highly ranked MBA programs. Getting ready to apply for an MBA in the USA can be a little overwhelming. But that’s why international student’s agencies like EduBookings are here to help. We can make the entire process easier, better and get your acceptance letter faster, as oppose as doing it by yourself. Getting your documents ready, researching for minimum requirements, finding the right program for you, learning which standardized tests you need to take, and many more steps shouldn’t scare you and prevent you from doing your MBA in the USA. Understanding there is a lot to have in mind, we have prepared a list of things to take into consideration when studying abroad in the U.S and getting ready to apply for your MBA. Check the minimum requirements. Find out if you need to take the GMAT test, what is the minimum GPA required from your bachelor’s degree and if work experience is a requirement for admission. Make sure you meet the minimum criteria, as the MBA process is very competitive and if you don’t meet the criteria don’t get discouraged. EduBookings can help you waive some of the requirements or find the right university for you. Align your finances with your MBA plans and get your expectations right. Learn the cost of tuition, cost of living and calculate if it falls within your budget. Find out if there are employment options. While doing your MBA in the USA, most universities offer employment options to international students, such as teacher assistantships and mentor programs. This could be a relief to your finances and also a great way of practicing what you are learning. Learn how many international students are enrolled in your potential university. Intercultural socialization has been proven to help build a successful academic program. Dealing with different cultures and nationalities is a great way to open your mind to new experiences. Find out if the business school of your desired university is accredited. You want to make sure you will get the best value of your money when choosing a university to do your MBA in the USA. Having a national or international accreditation guarantees that the university is reputable and its Business program, well recognized. Check if you need a credential evaluation. Most universities need help understanding your degree from your country, course by course. For this reason, organizations such as WES offer a credential evaluation of your studies, an admission requirement for most MBA programs. The cost of this evaluation value between $200 and $300, approximately. Prepare a good resume. Showing work experience plays a key role in the admission departments of the universities. In some cases, 3 or more years of work experience can help you wave minimum requirements such as the GMAT or the minimum GPA. Choosing a concentration when planning your MBA in the U.S is quite important. Specializing your master’s can help you shape your career and paint a sharper panorama of your future as a working business professional. Here are some of the most popular MBA concentrations in the USA: ACCOUNTING FINANCE MARKETING REAL STATE DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS ANALYTICS INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS ENTREPRENEURSHIP HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OPERATION MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNET MARKETING NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP PUBLIC MANAGEMENT TAXATION LOOKING FOR AN EASY WAY TO FIND YOUR MBA CONCENTRATION? Finding the right concentration for your MBA in the United States can be difficult, which is why EduBookings.com has created this online search tool for international students looking to begin the MBA abroad. Take a second to look at the video below and learn for yourself how easy it can be to find the right university that fits your needs, using the tool below: When studying abroad, meeting people from all over the world is a crucial aspect of your education. Understanding the intricacies of all the cultures and nationalities can be a great opportunity for you to open your mind and learn from others. Also, knowing that the university is welcoming to international students, and diversity is integrated into their business programs is definitely key. Here are some of the Business Schools with most international students, according to the U.S News & World Report: Syracuse University with 73.1% of international students enrolled in The Martin J. Whitman School of Management. The University of Connecticut with 64.5% of international students. Pace University with 52.1% of international students enrolled in the Lubin School of Business The University of Tampa with 51.7% of international students enrolled in the John H. Sykes College of Business. The University of San Diego with 50.6% of international students. As a student or young professional, you may consider pursuing a Master of Business Administration. An MBA is a popular way to build business and management skills, while also advancing in your career. You gain many invaluable skills, build a strong network, open your career path and learn to think about industry trends and issues differently. An MBA helps set you up for success in the competitive business industry and offers you credibility. But before you decide to make the investment, here’s an outline of what you need to know about an MBA program. What is an MBA? A Master of Business Administration degree, also known as an MBA, is an internationally recognized degree with a focus on refining skills needed in business and management careers. An MBA provides students with practical experience needed to succeed in such roles. The program first began at Harvard University in the United States, and has grown into one of the most popular professional degree programs internationally. It’s most commonly offered in English and takes two years to complete as a full-time student, however it’s possible to enroll in a single-year MBA program. You may also complete an MBA as a part-time student if you’re unable to commit your time entirely. Individuals who have previous managerial experience in the industry may apply for the executive MBA program (EMBA). What are the admission requirements? Below you’ll find a list of the general requirements for an MBA program, however each school may differ. To learn specific details, please contact your host school or explore their website. Note: if you meet the minimum admission requirements, this does not guarantee you a secure spot in the program. An undergraduate degree from a recognized institution with a B average in the final two years of studies Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Minimum two years relevant work experience English language proficiency score in IELTS or TOEFL (if studies weren’t completed in English) Completion of school’s online application which may include the following: essay(s), statement of interest, recent resume, two (or more) references, transcripts, GMAT or GRE scores What courses to expect When you choose to pursue an MBA, you are provided with a much better understanding of the world of business. Some of the programs you will be enrolled in include the following: Finance Accounting Business Ethics Economics Marketing Organizational Behaviour Entrepreneurship Business Law Business Communication Why get an MBA? Leadership skills Leadership skills Students who enroll in an MBA program are learning alongside bright, driven, high-strung personalities. When it comes to group projects, you will gain a lot of experience in leadership and conflict resolution. Working in a group setting naturally provides you with communication skills and the ability to motivate others as you all have one goal in common. In addition, completing an MBA provides you with credibility and shows other industry professionals you are an expert in the field, and are dedicated to the industry. Build a network Build a network of like minded people On top of being taught by some of the best mentors in the industry, you are constantly surrounded by like minded individuals who you can discuss industry trends and issues with. You both challenge and learn from each other, and connect on different topics, creating a type of community. This network could be incredibly useful to you whether you are on the hunt for a new job or are in need of someone to brainstorm ideas with when building a business. In addition to this, the school’s name will further connect you to other industry professionals. Career opportunities Career opportunities Many pursue an MBA to expand their career options, because with such a degree comes new skills you can apply in a number of fields. Having an MBA also provides you with higher chances of securing a managerial role, which in turn may present a higher salary. Some individuals pursue an MBA with the idea they will one day own their own company. Many leaders in the Fortune 500 companies have completed an MBA. This is not to say an MBA will guarantee a successful billion dollar company, however it opens many doors. Different perspective Think Globally Completing an MBA enhances your knowledge in the business and management industry, and allows you to think globally about big business issues. You learn to reflect much deeper and think from various angles when it comes to trends and issues in the industry. This in turn allows you to develop and apply smart solutions. It’s important to offer a fresh and unique perspective to potential future employers and employees. This specifically sets you apart from your competitors. So, you must now decide if an MBA is worth it. Will it help advance your career? Do the courses interest you? Are you in search of a business school in Canada or the USA? Register with ApplyBoard and find out which business schools are the best fit for you. Curious to know what the top business schools in Canada are? Read about it in our blog here! Adrianna Dyczkowsky, Public Relations Specialist at ApplyBoard Tags: Higher Education, International Education, Management, Masters, MBA, students, study abroad One Comment Know the facts: Western University Ivey Business School - ApplyBoard […] Here’s what you need to know about a Master’s in Business Administration […] What is a Master of Business Administration? A Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is a graduate level degree awarded to students with an advanced knowledge of business. MBA's cultivate skills in leadership with a focus on courses such as accounting, finance, economics, marketing and more. Start Your Master of Business Administration with No GMAT Required In any business-related career field, the MBA degree is highly sought after. The Master of Business Administration program at GCU enhances a broad range of marketable skills that can give job applicants an edge. Many working professionals want to get started on an MBA program online but lack the time to study for the GMAT. The Colangelo College of Business addresses this issue by inviting you to apply for the MBA program, with no GMAT required. Future business leaders and executives will focus on leadership development, operations management and organizational growth. GCU filters these content areas through the lens of ethical decision-making and critical thinking with a Christian worldview. GCU is a regionally accredited, private university. The core programs from the Colangelo College of Business are approved by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs. The Benefits of Having an MBA The online MBA with no GMAT required offers a path for deepening your understanding of the business knowledge, skills and processes that fuel success. In this MBA program, you will enhance these skills: Transformational leadership Effective communication Ethical decision-making Critical thinking and analysis Productive networking This master’s in business administration program is designed with a broad range of business fields in mind. As an MBA candidate, you will develop transferable skills that can apply to any industry. Master of Business Administration Courses and Topics GCU is a modern school that embraces a 21st century style of learning. With our online MBA program, you do not have to choose between your career and your education. Take courses online and take part in small group discussions in a diverse, online classroom. This degree requires a total of 46 credits. Most of the MBA online classes are eight weeks long. The core program courses include: Leadership and Organizations Accounting Practices Finance Principles Applied Business Probability and Statistics Marketing Management Managerial Accounting Operations Management You will also study quantitative tools and techniques, managerial finance, strategic management and economics. The coursework includes individual and group projects, case studies, theories and applications. Some of the core ideas you will examine include: Sustainability in the global marketplace Behaviors and techniques of efficient operations The use of economic data for smart decision-making Asset evaluation The program explores the management of working capital and the raising of funds in capital markets, as well as financial forecasting. Job Opportunities with an MBA The MBA is a respected degree that increases the capabilities and credibility of job applicants. You may decide to pursue your MBA shortly after graduating from a bachelor’s program. Or, you may apply when it becomes apparent that having an MBA may be a path toward pursuing a career as an executive or manager. Some examples of career paths that can stem from an MBA degree may include: Entrepreneur/founder Chief executive officer Vice president of operations Director of operations Business leaders are often expected to have an MBA. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, 79 percent of all employers surveyed expected to hire MBA graduates in 2017. A Master of Business Administration program can also open doors to future executives who are pursuing networking opportunities. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, of all companies surveyed that implement internship programs, 66 percent planned to offer these opportunities to MBA students in 2017. The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree will dramatically expand one’s knowledge of business and is the academic ticket to greater opportunities for employment, promotions, and income. The M.B.A. encapsulates complex business analyses, the effect of current events on the global business environment, multicultural influences on business decision-making, and examining the functional areas of business in addressing management decisions. The program includes courses in accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and data analytics. An M.B.A. offers a well-rounded foundation for a career in the corporate world or the education arena. It is vital that the student who wishes to pursue the M.B.A. seek a university that has earned the AACSB accreditation—as has MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business, an acknowledgement that the program has passed rigorous standards that evaluate faculty qualifications, curricula, missions and objectives, and other aspects that have created a high-quality business regimen. Students pursuing the M.B.A. program also may choose from three concentrations in Healthcare Management, Music Business or Concrete Industry Management. The latter is open only to those individuals who have considerable experience in the concrete industry and related fields. The M.B.A. is also available in a flexible, 100% online format. Learn more about the online M.B.A. program. Full-time MBA programs normally take place over two academic years (i.e. approximately 18 months of term time). For example, in the Northern Hemisphere they often begin in late August or early September of year one and continue until May or June of year two, with a three to four month summer break in between years one and two. Students enter with a reasonable amount of prior real-world work experience and take classes during weekdays like other university students. A typical full-time, accelerated, part-time, or modular MBA requires 60 credits (600 class hours) of graduate work.[25] Accelerated MBA programs are a variation of the two-year programs. They involve a higher course load with more intense class and examination schedules and are usually condensed into one year. They usually have less down time during the program and between semesters. For example, there is no three to four-month summer break, and between semesters there might be seven to ten days off rather than three to five weeks vacation. Accelerated programs typically have a lower cost than full-time two-year programs. Part-time MBA programs normally hold classes on weekday evenings after normal working hours, or on weekends. Part-time programs normally last three years or more. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who take a light course load for a longer period of time until the graduation requirements are met. Evening (second shift) MBA programs are full-time programs that normally hold classes on weekday evenings, after normal working hours, or on weekends for a duration of two years. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who can not leave their work to pursue a full-time regular shift MBA. Most second shift programs are offered at universities in India. Modular MBA programs are similar to part-time programs, although typically employing a lock-step curriculum with classes packaged together in blocks lasting from one to three weeks. Executive MBA (EMBA) programs developed to meet the educational needs of managers and executives, allowing students to earn an MBA (or another business-related graduate degree) in two years or less while working full-time. Participants come from every type and size of organization – profit, nonprofit, government – representing a variety of industries. EMBA students typically have a higher level of work experience, often 10 years or more, compared to other MBA students. In response to the increasing number of EMBA programs offered, The Executive MBA Council was formed in 1981 to advance executive education. Full-time executive MBA programs are a new category of full-time 1 year MBA programs aimed at professionals with approx. 5 years or more. They are primarily offered in countries like India where the 2-year MBA program is targeted at fresh graduates with no experience or minimal experience. These full-time executive MBA programs are similar to 1 year MBA programs offered by schools like Insead and IMD. Distance learning MBA programs hold classes off-campus. These programs can be offered in a number of different formats: correspondence courses by postal mail or email, non-interactive broadcast video, pre-recorded video, live teleconference or videoconference, offline or online computer courses. Many schools offer these programs. Blended learning programs combine distance learning with face-to-face instruction.[26] These programs typically target working professionals who are unable to attend traditional part-time programs.[27] MBA dual degree programs combine an MBA with others (such as an MS, MA, or a JD, etc.) to let students cut costs (dual programs usually cost less than pursuing 2 degrees separately), save time on education and to tailor the business education courses to their needs. This is generally achieved by allowing core courses of one program count as electives in the other. Some business schools offer programs in which students can earn both a bachelor's degree in business administration and an MBA in five years. Mini-MBA is a term used by many non-profit and for-profit institutions to describe a training regimen focused on the fundamentals of business. In the past, Mini-MBA programs have typically been offered as non-credit bearing courses that require less than 100 hours of total learning. However, due to the criticisms of these certificates, many schools have now shifted their programs to offer courses for full credit so that they may be applied towards a complete traditional MBA degree. This is to allow students to verify business related coursework for employment purposes and still allow the option to complete a full-time MBA degree program at a later period, if they elect to do so. Life insurance (or life assurance, especially in the Commonwealth of Nations) is a contract between an insurance policy holder and an insurer or assurer, where the insurer promises to pay a designated beneficiary a sum of money (the benefit) in exchange for a premium, upon the death of an insured person (often the policy holder). Depending on the contract, other events such as terminal illness or critical illness can also trigger payment. The policy holder typically pays a premium, either regularly or as one lump sum. Other expenses, such as funeral expenses, can also be included in the benefits. Life policies are legal contracts and the terms of the contract describe the limitations of the insured events. Specific exclusions are often written into the contract to limit the liability of the insurer; common examples are claims relating to suicide, fraud, war, riot, and civil commotion. Life-based contracts tend to fall into two major categories: Protection policies – designed to provide a benefit, typically a lump sum payment, in the event of a specified occurrence. A common form—more common in years past—of a protection policy design is term insurance. Investment policies – the main objective of these policies is to facilitate the growth of capital by regular or single premiums. Common forms (in the U.S.) are whole life, universal life, and variable life policies. Parties to contract The person responsible for making payments for a policy is the policy owner, while the insured is the person whose death will trigger payment of the death benefit. The owner and insured may or may not be the same person. For example, if Joe buys a policy on his own life, he is both the owner and the insured. But if Jane, his wife, buys a policy on Joe's life, she is the owner and he is the insured. The policy owner is the guarantor and he will be the person to pay for the policy. The insured is a participant in the contract, but not necessarily a party to it. Chart of a life insurance The beneficiary receives policy proceeds upon the insured person's death. The owner designates the beneficiary, but the beneficiary is not a party to the policy. The owner can change the beneficiary unless the policy has an irrevocable beneficiary designation. If a policy has an irrevocable beneficiary, any beneficiary changes, policy assignments, or cash value borrowing would require the agreement of the original beneficiary. In cases where the policy owner is not the insured (also referred to as the celui qui vit or CQV), insurance companies have sought to limit policy purchases to those with an insurable interest in the CQV. For life insurance policies, close family members and business partners will usually be found to have an insurable interest. The insurable interest requirement usually demonstrates that the purchaser will actually suffer some kind of loss if the CQV dies. Such a requirement prevents people from benefiting from the purchase of purely speculative policies on people they expect to die. With no insurable interest requirement, the risk that a purchaser would murder the CQV for insurance proceeds would be great. In at least one case, an insurance company which sold a policy to a purchaser with no insurable interest (who later murdered the CQV for the proceeds), was found liable in court for contributing to the wrongful death of the victim (Liberty National Life v. Weldon, 267 Ala.171 (1957)). Contract terms Special exclusions may apply, such as suicide clauses, whereby the policy becomes null and void if the insured commits suicide within a specified time (usually two years after the purchase date; some states provide a statutory one-year suicide clause). Any misrepresentations by the insured on the application may also be grounds for nullification. Most US states specify a maximum contestability period, often no more than two years. Only if the insured dies within this period will the insurer have a legal right to contest the claim on the basis of misrepresentation and request additional information before deciding whether to pay or deny the claim. The face amount of the policy is the initial amount that the policy will pay at the death of the insured or when the policy matures, although the actual death benefit can provide for greater or lesser than the face amount. The policy matures when the insured dies or reaches a specified age (such as 100 years old). Costs, insurability, and underwriting The insurance company calculates the policy prices (premiums) at a level sufficient to fund claims, cover administrative costs, and provide a profit. The cost of insurance is determined using mortality tables calculated by actuaries. Mortality tables are statistically based tables showing expected annual mortality rates of people at different ages. Put simply, people are more likely to die as they get older and the mortality tables enable the insurance companies to calculate the risk and increase premiums with age accordingly. Such estimates can be important in taxation regulation.[8][9] In the 1980s and 1990s, the SOA 1975–80 Basic Select & Ultimate tables were the typical reference points, while the 2001 VBT and 2001 CSO tables were published more recently. As well as the basic parameters of age and gender, the newer tables include separate mortality tables for smokers and non-smokers, and the CSO tables include separate tables for preferred classes.[10] The mortality tables provide a baseline for the cost of insurance, but the health and family history of the individual applicant is also taken into account (except in the case of Group policies). This investigation and resulting evaluation is termed underwriting. Health and lifestyle questions are asked, with certain responses possibly meriting further investigation. Specific factors that may be considered by underwriters include: Personal medical history[11] Family medical history[12] Driving record[13] Height and weight matrix, otherwise known as BMI (Body Mass Index)[14] Based on the above and additional factors, applicants will be placed into one of several classes of health ratings which will determine the premium paid in exchange for insurance at that particular carrier.[13] Life insurance companies in the United States support the Medical Information Bureau (MIB),[15] which is a clearing house of information on persons who have applied for life insurance with participating companies in the last seven years. As part of the application, the insurer often requires the applicant's permission to obtain information from their physicians.[16] Automated Life Underwriting is a technology solution which is designed to perform all or some of the screening functions traditionally completed by underwriters, and thus seeks to reduce the work effort, time and/or data necessary to underwrite a life insurance application.[17] These systems allow point of sale distribution and can shorten the time frame for issuance from weeks or even months to hours or minutes, depending on the amount of insurance being purchased.[18] The mortality of underwritten persons rises much more quickly than the general population. At the end of 10 years, the mortality of that 25-year-old, non-smoking male is 0.66/1000/year. Consequently, in a group of one thousand 25-year-old males with a $100,000 policy, all of average health, a life insurance company would have to collect approximately $50 a year from each participant to cover the relatively few expected claims. (0.35 to 0.66 expected deaths in each year × $100,000 payout per death = $35 per policy.) Other costs, such as administrative and sales expenses, also need to be considered when setting the premiums. A 10-year policy for a 25-year-old non-smoking male with preferred medical history may get offers as low as $90 per year for a $100,000 policy in the competitive US life insurance market. Most of the revenue received by insurance companies consists of premiums, but revenue from investing the premiums forms an important source of profit for most life insurance companies. Group Insurance policies are an exception to this. In the United States, life insurance companies are never legally required to provide coverage to everyone, with the exception of Civil Rights Act compliance requirements. Insurance companies alone determine insurability, and some people are deemed uninsurable. The policy can be declined or rated (increasing the premium amount to compensate for the higher risk), and the amount of the premium will be proportional to the face value of the policy. Many companies separate applicants into four general categories. These categories are preferred best, preferred, standard, and tobacco. Preferred best is reserved only for the healthiest individuals in the general population. This may mean, that the proposed insured has no adverse medical history, is not under medication, and has no family history of early-onset cancer, diabetes, or other conditions.[19] Preferred means that the proposed insured is currently under medication and has a family history of particular illnesses. Most people are in the standard category. People in the tobacco category typically have to pay higher premiums due to the higher mortality. Recent US mortality tables predict that roughly 0.35 in 1,000 non-smoking males aged 25 will die during the first year of a policy.[20] Mortality approximately doubles for every extra ten years of age, so the mortality rate in the first year for non-smoking men is about 2.5 in 1,000 people at age 65.[20] Compare this with the US population male mortality rates of 1.3 per 1,000 at age 25 and 19.3 at age 65 (without regard to health or smoking status).[21] Death proceeds Upon the insured's death, the insurer requires acceptable proof of death before it pays the claim. The normal minimum proof required is a death certificate, and the insurer's claim form completed, signed, and typically notarized.[citation needed] If the insured's death is suspicious and the policy amount is large, the insurer may investigate the circumstances surrounding the death before deciding whether it has an obligation to pay the claim. Payment from the policy may be as a lump sum or as an annuity, which is paid in regular installments for either a specified period or for the beneficiary's lifetime.[22] Insurance vs assurance The specific uses of the terms "insurance" and "assurance" are sometimes confused. In general, in jurisdictions where both terms are used, "insurance" refers to providing coverage for an event that might happen (fire, theft, flood, etc.), while "assurance" is the provision of coverage for an event that is certain to happen. In the United States, both forms of coverage are called "insurance" for reasons of simplicity in companies selling both products.[citation needed] By some definitions, "insurance" is any coverage that determines benefits based on actual losses whereas "assurance" is coverage with predetermined benefits irrespective of the losses incurred. Life insurance may be divided into two basic classes: temporary and permanent; or the following subclasses: term, universal, whole life, and endowment life insurance. Term insurance Main article: Term life insurance Term assurance provides life insurance coverage for a specified term. The policy does not accumulate cash value. Term insurance is significantly less expensive than an equivalent permanent policy but will become higher with age. Policy holders can save to provide for increased term premiums or decrease insurance needs (by paying off debts or saving to provide for survivor needs).[23] Mortgage life insurance insures a loan secured by real property and usually features a level premium amount for a declining policy face value because what is insured is the principal and interest outstanding on a mortgage that is constantly being reduced by mortgage payments. The face amount of the policy is always the amount of the principal and interest outstanding that are paid should the applicant die before the final installment is paid. Group life insurance Group life insurance (also known as wholesale life insurance or institutional life insurance) is term insurance covering a group of people, usually employees of a company, members of a union or association, or members of a pension or superannuation fund. Individual proof of insurability is not normally a consideration in its underwriting. Rather, the underwriter considers the size, turnover, and financial strength of the group. Contract provisions will attempt to exclude the possibility of adverse selection. Group life insurance often allows members exiting the group to maintain their coverage by buying individual coverage. The underwriting is carried out for the whole group instead of individuals. Permanent life insurance Permanent life insurance is life insurance that covers the remaining lifetime of the insured. A permanent insurance policy accumulates a cash value up to its date of maturation. The owner can access the money in the cash value by withdrawing money, borrowing the cash value, or surrendering the policy and receiving the surrender value. The three basic types of permanent insurance are whole life, universal life, and endowment. Whole life Main article: Whole life insurance Whole life insurance provides lifetime coverage for a set premium amount (see main article for a full explanation of the many variations and options). Universal life coverage Universal life insurance (ULl) is a relatively new insurance product, intended to combine permanent insurance coverage with greater flexibility in premium payments, along with the potential for greater growth of cash values. There are several types of universal life insurance policies, including interest-sensitive (also known as "traditional fixed universal life insurance"), variable universal life (VUL), guaranteed death benefit, and has equity-indexed universal life insurance. Universal life insurance policies have cash values. Paid-in premiums increase their cash values; administrative and other costs reduce their cash values. Universal life insurance addresses the perceived disadvantages of whole life—namely that premiums and death benefits are fixed. With universal life, both the premiums and death benefit are flexible. With the exception of guaranteed-death-benefit universal life policies, universal life policies trade their greater flexibility off for fewer guarantees. "Flexible death benefit" means the policy owner can choose to decrease the death benefit. The death benefit can also be increased by the policy owner, usually requiring new underwriting. Another feature of flexible death benefit is the ability to choose option A or option B death benefits and to change those options over the course of the life of the insured. Option A is often referred to as a "level death benefit"; death benefits remain level for the life of the insured, and premiums are lower than policies with Option B death benefits, which pay the policy's cash value—i.e., a face amount plus earnings/interest. If the cash value grows over time, the death benefits do too. If the cash value declines, the death benefit also declines. Option B policies normally feature higher premiums than option A policies. Endowments Main article: Endowment policy The endowment policy is a life insurance contract designed to pay a lump sum after a specific term (on its 'maturity') or on death. Typical maturities are ten, fifteen or twenty years up to a certain age limit. Some policies also pay out in the case of critical illness. Policies are typically traditional with-profits or unit-linked (including those with unitized with-profits funds). Endowments can be cashed in early (or surrendered) and the holder then receives the surrender value which is determined by the insurance company depending on how long the policy has been running and how much has been paid into it. Accidental death Accidental death insurance is a type of limited life insurance that is designed to cover the insured should they die as the result of an accident. "Accidents" run the gamut from abrasions to catastrophes but normally do not include deaths resulting from non-accident-related health problems or suicide. Because they only cover accidents, these policies are much less expensive than other life insurance policies. Such insurance can also be accidental death and dismemberment insurance or AD&D. In an AD&D policy, benefits are available not only for accidental death but also for the loss of limbs or body functions such as sight and hearing. Accidental death and AD&D policies very rarely pay a benefit, either because the cause of death is not covered by the policy or because death occurs well after the accident, by which time the premiums have gone unpaid. To know what coverage they have, insureds should always review their policies. Risky activities such as parachuting, flying, professional sports, or military service are often omitted from coverage. Accidental death insurance can also supplement standard life insurance as a rider. If a rider is purchased, the policy generally pays double the face amount if the insured dies from an accident. This was once called double indemnity insurance. In some cases, triple indemnity coverage may be available. Senior and pre-need products Insurance companies have in recent years developed products for niche markets, most notably targeting seniors in an aging population. These are often low to moderate face value whole life insurance policies, allowing senior citizens to purchase affordable insurance later in life. This may also be marketed as final expense insurance and usually have death benefits between $2,000 and $40,000. One reason for their popularity is that they only require answers to simple "yes" or "no" questions, while most policies require a medical exam to qualify. As with other policy types, the range of premiums can vary widely and should be scrutinized prior to purchase, as should the reliability of the companies. Health questions can vary substantially between exam and no-exam policies. It may be possible for individuals with certain conditions to qualify for one type of coverage and not another.[citation needed] Because seniors sometimes are not fully aware of the policy provisions it is important to make sure that policies last for a lifetime and that premiums do not increase every 5 years as is common in some circumstances.[citation needed] Pre-need life insurance policies are limited premium payment, whole life policies that are usually purchased by older applicants, though they are available to everyone. This type of insurance is designed to cover specific funeral expenses that the applicant has designated in a contract with a funeral home. The policy's death benefit is initially based on the funeral cost at the time of prearrangement, and it then typically grows as interest is credited. In exchange for the policy owner's designation, the funeral home typically guarantees that the proceeds will cover the cost of the funeral, no matter when death occurs. Excess proceeds may go either to the insured's estate, a designated beneficiary, or the funeral home as set forth in the contract. Purchasers of these policies usually make a single premium payment at the time of prearrangement, but some companies also allow premiums to be paid over as much as ten years. A LEADER IN ATTORNEY, COPY & MESSENGER SERVICES For over two decades, Advanced Attorney Services, Inc. has been a leading Attorney, Copy and Messenger services provider in Southern California. With a wide range of business solutions offered, Advanced is committed to superior service standards by providing our clients with new and innovative methods of operating to ensure the highest quality of services available at competitive rates. If your firm is in need of immediate or same day court service, process service, deposition services, writ services, fax filings, E-Filings, messenger, on or off-site copy services, as well as a wide range of other services, allow Advanced Attorney Services to get the job done right.A lawyer referral service maintains a network of lawyers, and connects people in need of lawyers with its participating attorneys. A potential client who contacts a lawyer referral service is directed to a lawyer who practices in the area of law that is most appropriate for their situation. Some lawyer referral services charge a fee for providing a referral, while others provide referrals at no cost to the prospective client. Many referral services connect prospective clients with lawyers who have agreed to provide a low-cost or free initial consultation.[1] Referral services are often provided by state and local bar associations as a public service. Referral services may also be offered by non-profit organizations and advocacy groups. For-profit referral services[1] may connect lawyers with clients who pay a membership fee, or a fee for successfully referred clients, subject to rules against sharing fees with non-lawyers.[2] Historically, lawyer referral services involved prospective clients contacting a bar association or responding to an advertisement, by placing a telephone call to the service and seeking a referral. [3] With the internet boom in the 1990s, many consumers turned to the web to search for goods and services.[4] A research study released in 2012, shows that 76 percent of adult consumers looking for a lawyer used online resources at some point during the search process.[5]Some referral services provide referrals to lawyers in a broad range of areas of legal practice. Others may focus on referrals within a narrow range of practice areas, or a single practice area.[6] Online lawyer referral services are sometimes called attorney-client matching services. People who contact a service may be matched with one or more attorneys, based upon such factors as area of legal practice and geographic location. Lawyers who participate in these services may pay a fee for participation, a fee for each referral, or in some cases a percentage of the amount charged to a referred client.[7] In some cases the prospective client will be able to choose from a list of referred attorneys, while in other cases the referral will be made to a specific participating lawyer.[8] If a client is unable to afford a lawyer and the legal problem is not a matter that can be handled by a lawyer on a percentage fee basis, some referral services may attempt to match the client with a pro bono lawyer, or direct the client to contact a legal aid organization or law student clinic for help.[9] Ethical issues may arise for lawyers who participate in for-profit referral services, and state rules governing participation can vary significantly.[10][11][12] Some referral services are certified by bar associations,[13] including the American Bar Association.[14] Certified referral services must maintain standards of service as defined by the certifying organization. Among those standards, certification may require that participating lawyers meet minimum standards of experience, or maintain legal malpractice insurance. The American Bar Association provides a list attorney referral services that meet its certification requirements.[15] Some legal associations have expressed concern that lawyer referral services can lead to lawyers trying to undercut each other to get clients, rather than focusing on quality of service and the development of their reputation among their peers.[16] Another concern about lawyer referral services relates to client confidentiality. When a prospective client contacts a lawyer directly about retaining the lawyer's services, the communication is normally held absolutely confidential under principles of attorney-client privilege. Where a lawyer referral service collects information from a person who is seeking a lawyer, that information will not normally be confidential, raising the possibility that information provided to the referral service will be discoverable by the opposing party in any subsequent litigation.[17] Lawyer referral services may have minimal requirements for participation, and in some cases may not do any verification of a lawyer's qualification or credentials. As a consequence, it remains necessary for a person who uses a referral service to investigate a lawyer's qualification before retaining the lawyer.[7] Some controversy also arises from whether professional referral services are anti-competitive in nature.[citation needed] For instance, since Board Certified attorneys often charge a higher hourly rate than other competent general practitioners, if a Lawyer Referral Service requires Board Certification for certain types of referrals, instead of merely providing the public a choice between a Board Certified attorney and a competent attorney who is not Board Certified, the effect may be to restrict competition and restrict public choice and push up consumer prices.[citation needed] State bars, which license attorneys, may be complicit in restricting client choice.[citation needed] 5 Types of Insurance You Need, and 4 Types of Policies You Don’t Posted by Miranda Marquit Last updated on May 24, 2019 | Insurance Advertiser Disclosure: Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any other entity. This site may be compensated through the advertiser Affiliate Program. [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Insurance is an interesting industry. It is there to protect you, but it sometimes seems like a huge waste of resources if you don’t end up needing it. Of course, if you do end up with a serious problem, not having insurance could take an already difficult situation and turn it into a financial catastrophe. While you don’t need to insure against everything, there are a few insurance policies that you should have. The key is to recognize which insurance policies are the most essential to protect yourself and find a way to incorporate them into your budget. Not doing so is a gamble which can have a devastating financial impact if something happens. Table of Contents 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need 1. Auto Insurance 2. Life Insurance 3. Home/Rental Insurance 4. Health Insurance 5. Disability Insurance 6. Travel Insurance 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need 1. Life Insurance for Children 2. Mortgage Life Insurance 3. Credit Card Insurance 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need These are the types of insurance you need to insure against the largest threats to your budget in the event of an unexpected disaster: 1. Auto Insurance If you have a car, you need auto insurance – and not only because every state law requires that you carry it. For many people, their car is their only way to get to work; if it becomes un-drivable due to an accident, and the money isn’t available to buy a new one, it can be hard to earn a living. Additionally, if you are at fault in an accident, the liability you have could become very expensive. Your auto insurance policy may pay medical bills and property damage so that you wouldn’t be forced to come up with the money out of pocket, possibly resulting in financial ruin. The good news is auto insurance is a competitive industry. You can easily compare rates with different car insurance companies to find the best deal in your area. 2. Life Insurance Life insurance is probably the most important insurance policy you will ever purchase. It protects your loved ones by providing income for them in the event you pass on. It can also be a good idea to insure your life, even if you aren’t the primary breadwinner. After all, the duties of a stay-at-home spouse are worth quite a bit. Though you may not pay a stay-at-home spouse a salary, it would be expensive to replace everything they do to run the household. Consider your needs, and make sure that you have adequate life insurance. There are also other forms of life insurance such as Mortgage Life Insurance, check out our post on the pros and cons for your reference! 3. Home/Rental Insurance Your home represents a huge, expensive asset. If it’s damaged, it’ll cost you, big time. And depending on how bad the damage is, you might not be able to live there while repairs are being made. Depending on your policy, homeowners insurance can help you pay for home repairs, short-term lodging, or even a new home . . . without a huge outlay of capital all at once. Rental insurance is also a good idea, since the landlord’s property insurance usually only covers the structure and land, but not the contents of the rental property. Thankfully, rental insurance is usually very affordable, sometimes as low as $10 a month. At that price, you can’t afford to skip it. With whichever option you need you can get instant online quotes through Lemonade. They are changing the homeowners/renters insurance market with low instant rates. Get homeowners/renters insurance rates with Lemonade>> 4. Health Insurance If you are uninsured, you may be one hospital stay away from bankruptcy. Health insurance will help you offset some of the rising costs of health care – at least when it comes to large health needs. If you have a chronic condition, health insurance can help you better afford the care you need. Even if you are in good health, and rarely use health care services, it can be a good idea to at least have a policy that covers major medical problems, just in case an accident befalls you. Get Health Insurance Rates >> 5. Disability Insurance Statistics show that 1 in 4 people will become disabled at some point before they retire. Even though this statistic includes people who receive short term disability, it is an astounding number. This makes us ask the question, “Can I afford a short term or long term disability?” Is your emergency fund large enough to sustain no income for a month? What about two months, or three months, or six months? The average monthly benefit paid by Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is $1,065 per month. Will that be enough to support your family? Disability insurance can help cover the unknown situations, and it can be a good idea, especially if you are the primary breadwinner in your household or work in a high-risk industry. Should you have an injury that qualifies for your policy, your disability insurance will pay you while you are unable to work. Disability insurance policies often vary substantially between providers, so be sure to thoroughly review your policy to understand which situations qualify for benefits, how and when you qualify for payments, how much you will receive, etc. Typically, there is a waiting period of up to 30 days or longer before disability benefits kick in, so it is always good to have an emergency fund in place so you can have something to live on in the meantime. 6. Travel Insurance Yes, you may want to consider travel insurance, especially in certain situations. For example, let’s say you plan the trip of your lifetime, and you go all out, virtually without regard to your budget (which is extreme, I know). You may not want to have to worry about spending tens of thousands of dollars and have something come up with ruins the whole deal. For a small fee, you can hedge your bets here. Of course, if you’re planning a little weekend trip and making your travel by car, you might want to pass up any extra costs. 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need In one of my favorite episodes of the television show Family Guy, a slick door-to-door salesman convinces the bumbling Peter to purchase volcano insurance. When Peter first suggests that they’d never had volcano trouble in Rhode Island, the salesman responds “Don’t you think we’re due for one?” which of course ensures his sale. Even though it would take effort to be as naïve as Peter, there are definitely times when it’s difficult to know if the insurance you are considering is worth your money, or if it’s just another example of volcano insurance. Here are four insurance policies that you can feel comfortable skipping: 1. Life Insurance for Children The traditional purpose of life insurance is to financially provide for your family in the case of premature death. Since your children are not contributing financially to the family, and will most likely grow up to be safe and healthy, paying into premiums for their life insurance does not make sense. The money you would spend on premiums would be better spent in an emergency fund, a 529 plan for their education, or in an IRA. Exceptions: There are times when a life insurance policy for makes sense for children. This includes when your child earns an income and contributes to the family, or when you can get a very inexpensive rider on your life insurance policy. Otherwise, you may be better off skipping the life insurance policy for your children. 2. Mortgage Life Insurance On the surface, this seems like a reasonable policy. This insurance will pay off your mortgage in the event of your death, giving your family one less financial headache during a stressful time. However, a good life insurance policy should provide your heirs with enough money to handle the mortgage and any other bills that they will have to pay. There’s no need to purchase a separate policy for this—just make sure that your life insurance is adequate to cover your family’s needs. (caveat: mortgage life insurance can be a good idea if you have preexisting conditions and are ineligible for a term life insurance policy; otherwise, term is the way to go). 3. Credit Card Insurance For those who carry a balance on their credit card, having a policy that will pay your credit card bill in the event that you are unable to do so seems like a smart plan. The benefits of these plans are relatively limited, however, meaning you’re paying a monthly premium only to have your benefits capped and still be in debt. It makes much more sense to send the amount of the premium toward your bill and try to get your credit card paid off. You’ll save money on interest in addition to avoiding having to pay another bill. 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance The sad fact of the matter is that many medical insurance policies have holes in their coverage. Because of that, specific disease insurance policies—and specifically cancer insurance—have become popular over the past few years to take care of the gaps in regular medical coverage. The problem with these types of insurance is that they are so specific, and they do not necessarily cover everything related to the disease. For example, many cancer insurance policies do not cover skin cancers, which are the most common form of the disease. A better use of your money would be to upgrade your current health insurance. That way you’re covered no matter what happens. When it comes to insurance, always make sure you take the time to do some research into what you need and what will be covered before you sign on the dotted line. And beware volcano insurance salesmen! [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Are there other types of insurance people need (or should at least consider)? Leave a comment with your thoughts! Supply and Variable Charges No matter which tariff structure you select, your bill is usually divided into supply and variable charges. The supply charge is unaffected by your energy consumption. It is listed on your bill as a “supply charge” or “service charge,” and refers to a daily charge you receive regardless of how much energy you use. The supply charge is the charge you receive for being connected to the energy grid. Some suppliers offer discounts on the supply charge, which benefits households that don’t use very much energy. The second charge on your bill is a variable charge. Most of the time this appears as a “usage charge” on your bill. For electricity, suppliers charge based on cents per kilowatt hour (kWh). Most suppliers offer discounts on usage charges, which are usually the largest portion of your bill. Peak and Controlled Load Usage Peak and controlled load peak usage hours are two of the terms you’ll see a lot when looking at electricity consumption. They may appear on your bill whether or not your plan even includes peak and controlled load hours for billing purposes. Not all plans use peak and controlled load rates. Most suppliers allow you to select a single-rate tariff or a time of use tariff. The latter option takes peak usage into account. Single Rate Tariff A single rate tariff charges you the same amount for your energy consumption, regardless of the time of day you use the most energy. These plans are good for those who use the bulk of their electricity during peak hours. In contrast, a time of use plan charges higher rates during peak hours, so you’ll pay more for the energy you use during these times. Your electricity bill may still say ‘general usage’ even if you have a single rate tariff. In this case you’re not being charged more, it’s simply how the energy supplier categorises your energy use. Time of Use Tariff The time of use tariff divides the day into peak hours and controlled load hours. Peak hours vary depending on your supplier and your plan, but tend to be during times when more people are using electricity. For example, weekday afternoons and early evenings are likely to be peak times. Electricity usage is cheaper during controlled load hours and more expensive during peak times. Time of use plans tend to be better for those who use most of their energy in the morning or at night. If it’s feasible to do so, you could save money by waiting to use more electricity during controlled load hours. Block Pricing Your electricity supplier may charge you using block pricing. In this tariff type, your usage is broken into two or more blocks of kilowatt hours. Your supplier charges the first energy block at one rate. After you exceed the specified limit, you move into the second block and are charged a different rate. Some suppliers charge a lower rate for the first block and increase the rate for subsequent blocks, while other suppliers do the opposite. The majority of energy suppliers use two blocks for pricing, but some go as high as five. Block pricing can save you money if you can access a pricing model that suits your usage. Smaller households that don’t use much electricity may be able to stay within the first block and pay a lower rate. Larger households that use high amounts of electricity could benefit from block pricing that starts at a higher rate and decreases as usage goes up. A controlled load tariff is one of the more obscure tariffs you can find through electricity suppliers. It’s worth considering controlled load tariffs, because they could save you money. With a controlled load tariff, you are charged separately for the electricity used to power a specific appliance such as hot water or slab heating. The controlled load appliance runs on a separate circuit than the rest of your home, and may have its own meter. The supplier charges one rate for your normal electricity usage, and a different rate for the controlled load. The catch to controlled load tariffs is that the appliance can only be used during a specified time frame. In New South Wales and Queensland you can choose between controlled load one and controlled load 2: the first option is cheaper, but the second operates under a longer time frame. Controlled load tariffs are designed for appliances that don’t need to run continuously, which is why they work well for hot water systems. Can a Controlled Load Tariff Save You Money? Some suppliers, however, provide discounts with no strings attached. Weigh up these discounts carefully when making your decision. The amount of money you save will also depend on a few factors. Your location and the supplier’s rate will determine whether or not it’s worth separating one or two of your major appliances on a controlled load. To access a controlled load tariff, customers will typically need to make arrangements with their electricity provider. Mortgage rates are continuing their downward spiral. According to Freddie Mac, the average rate on a 30-year fixed-rate loan has dropped to just 3.82%—down from 4.54% last June and its lowest point in nearly two years. The dip presents a prime opportunity for buyers and existing homeowners alike. For those looking to get out of the rent race, it means the most affordable interest rates since September 2017. As Vishal Garg, CEO of digital mortgage lender Better.com, explains, “Now is the most opportune time to get a loan. If you’re renting, you’re simply paying your landlord’s mortgage.” For those who already own a home, the rate drop could mean serious financial savings over time. In fact, according to data and analytics firm Black Knight, nearly every mortgage loan originated in 2018 could see a rate drop via refinancing. In total, a whopping 6.8 million homeowners could now qualify for a refinance and save at least 75 basis points—or around $268 per month. Less than two months ago, just 2 million homeowners could see these kinds of savings. Still, it’s not all about the rate. Refinance-eligible homeowners also have a chance to leverage their home equity. As Garg says, it’s “a rare opportunity for Americans to improve their financial health.” “If you have any other type of debt—car loan, credit card, student loan—and you own a home, you can tap into the equity of your home to pay off these other higher-interest loans,” Garg said. But experts caution that Freddie Mac’s average rate is just that—an average. Rates vary greatly from lender to lender, and a borrower's credit, debts and other factors all play a role in mortgage rates as well. In order to get the best rate possible, Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist Sam Khafer says shopping around is key. “While the drop in mortgage rates is a good opportunity for consumers to save on their mortgage payment, our research indicates that there can be a wide dispersion among mortgage rate offers,” he said. Khater estimates the average buyer can save around $1,500 up front by getting just one additional mortgage quote. Over the life of a 30-year loan, shopping around can save buyers more than $44,000, according to LendingTree's most recent Mortgage Comparison Shopping Report. That is both an easy and complex question, so let's do easy first: As a rule, in the United States the terms lawyer and attorney are interchangeable. Now for the hard answer. It's hard because we have to go back a bit in history to understand the distinctions. The term "lawyer" was generally used to refer to any person who has studied and been trained in the law. The lawyers of the early U.S. nationhood are a good example. Someone like John Adams or Thomas Jefferson were not only leaders of the American Revolution but they also were lawyers. An interesting note on Adams's career is that he actually provided a learned, principled, and successful defense of the British soldiers accused of crimes arising from the Boston Massacre. His reason was the same that many criminal defense attorneys cite today for their own careers. Every person, no matter how they are seen by the general public, deserves a zealous and competent defense (something we now find in the Sixth Amendment of the Constitution). As education in the U.S. improved and law began to become its own discipline, the term "attorney at law" (also attorney-at-law) was created around 1768. For a short time there was an effort to distinguish the two terms. The lawyer was one who studied and graduated after studying law, however, they were not necessarily seen as someone who had passed the bar; therefore they did not "practice law" before a court. Even today we see that one can graduate from an American law school, thus becoming a lawyer, but not pass the bar exam. Without the passing score on the bar exam, one can't be admitted to practice law in the jurisdiction (state or federal). The attorney at law, which was later shortened to just attorney, was used in some instances to mean a professional who is qualified to give legal advice and to represent a party in court. Eventually, the early form of the law degree (which was considered a professional degree much like that for the ministry or medicine) evolved to a point that it would require a much higher level of education in order to be reasonably qualified. Today, the terms attorney and lawyer are used interchangeably, mostly because the need to distinguish the right to practice law became so well defined with the expansion of the individual jurisdictions judicial system and also because the qualifying degree today to sit for the bar exam is a professional doctorate degree; usually the Juris Doctorate or J.D. There are still those who graduate from law school but never sit for the bar exam. The law degree is an excellent degree which can be used in many areas of business and government work other than the practice of law. Thus, the concept that one is a lawyer by virtue of the law degree still exists, it is just not enforced as enthusiastically as in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

“El nos acechaba a las mujeres de aquí todas las mañanas entre las 6am, y nos atracaba”, manifestó una mujer quien había sido víctima del delincuente.

Los residentes se mostraron furiosos y satisfechos por la golpiza que le habían proporcionado al delincuente, ya que según estos, se hizo justicia con el individuo que había causado tanto daño a mujeres y personas indefensas.

one of the most useful postgraduate degrees an international student can earn is a Master of Business Administration (MBA). This degree opens many doors regarding your employment, or any business endeavors you wish to pursue. MBAs are available to students who have already earned a bachelor's degree. Whatever your reason for considering earning an MBA, you’re going to want to begin the process having answered some key questions: What is an MBA? Why earn an MBA? How can an MBA benefit your career? How do you begin? What is an MBA? The MBA degree is widely believed to be one of the most prestigious and sought-after degrees in the world. Students of MBA programs study the theory and application of business and management principles. This type of study equips students with knowledge that can be applied to a variety of real-world business industries and situations.​ Why earn an MBA? Students may ask, what is an MBA for? In today's fast-paced economy, the MBA is the most popular professional degree around the world. The program blends advanced skills in business and management with real-world experience to prepare graduates for starting or advancing in a management career in any field they choose. In many cases, an MBA degree is required for executive and senior management positions. There are some companies who will not even consider applicants unless they have an MBA degree. Business school professors say MBA programs help students develop the skills required to excel as business executives, such as the ability to quickly and accurately analyze large amounts of information and the ability to develop smart solutions to business problems. How can an MBA benefit your career? Some of the reasons and benefits include: Advancing your career - This can mean a number of different things. In a circumstance where you have worked with a company and earned an MBA later on in your employment with them, you can leverage your position into a more prominent role. The best way to do so would be to keep an eye for in-house promotions that you could see yourself advancing to and being prepared to apply for it with your new credentials. An MBA is highly esteemed in nearly any industry and will often fast track you to better opportunities. Developing your business savvy - Your MBA will help in growing your professional network. You will come across many opportunities to connect with other MBAs and companies seeking to work with an MBA graduate. Utilizing the skills you learn from having an MBA will be invaluable in helping you with job security. Your degree will often make you an indispensable team member. Leading in an emerging field - Often these days, knowing an industry versus knowing how to maneuver in that industry with expertise will be the quality employers will seek. Many people can be taught how to work in specific industries, but not everyone will have the capacity to lead in said industries. Equipped with your MBA, you will likely be a frontrunner in any leading role in a field that is still budding. Starting your own business - Becoming an entrepreneur might be one of the most popular reasons to earn an MBA. To excel as an entrepreneur, you’ll need to learn to communicate effectively and persuasively. For many people, these skills don’t come naturally, but now more than ever, business schools have come to realize how critical it is for their students to graduate with the personal skills required for effective leadership. Business school is also the safest place to test out your most creative, outrageous, and ambitious ideas without the pressure and fear of failure if that company or those ideas don't work. You'll have teachers and mentors guiding you along the way as you search for your big idea. How do you begin? You’ll want to begin by choosing a school. When searching for a college or university in the US to pursue an MBA, here are a few things to consider: A good place to start is program length. There are a few options on what to pursue and how when it comes to an MBA. Full-time MBA programs in the US typically take two years to complete, but many programs also have one-year, accelerated options. Part-time MBA programs allow the flexibility of attending evening and/or weekend classes to accommodate to life’s busy schedule. Accelerated MBA programs are another recent addition to the MBA in the US offerings. Targeted at students with a background in business education (or the ability to make up for lost time through self-study), accelerated MBA programs in the US can take anywhere from 12-18 months to complete. Because of their emphasis on speed they spend considerably less time reviewing introductory material and eliminate many opportunities for degree specialization. Your options are plentiful, but many people will consider rankings and student satisfaction when choosing a school. Schools throughout the US such as Auburn University in Alabama, American University in Washington, DC, Emory University in Georgia, or Purdue University in Indiana that are ranked in the top 100 schools for MBAs are good ones to consider. Once you find an MBA program you want to... Begin the application process. There are actually three stages to the admissions cycle: pre-application, application, and post-application. Some business schools also give prospective MBAs three different application deadlines by separating the admissions season into rounds. Being aware of when each round occurs lets prospective students know when to complete the GMAT, get letters of recommendation, and prepare all other material required for admissions. If you have the chance to interview for programs where there’s the option to do so, be sure to take advantage. Like most application processes your resume, recommendations, and a completed application are required. Beyond the standard, an MBA application will include essays, transcripts, and GMAT scores. The goal for applicants is to present a strong application across all the evaluation materials. The stronger each element of the application is the higher the chance of being admitted in an MBA program in the USA. Most American business schools-regardless of the major focus-will train you in the principles of general business management. These principles include a combination of accounting, economics, finance, marketing and statistics, among other topics. American universities also offer a wealth of specialized M.B.A. programs and classes to tailor your degree. Depending on your intended career goals, you'll find programs that offer a more focused approach, including business administration, finance, human resources, information technology, marketing, nonprofit administration, and more. THEORY IN PRACTICE At every level, the American higher education system is different. Foundational principles and theories must be taught, but they are only mastered through practice. MBA programs in the United States strongly reflect this teaching philosophy. You will examine real-world case studies and business scenarios in order to devise strategies, business plans, budgets, etc. These types of projects will prepare you for real-life business situations and to approach them with practical knowledge. “In logistics management class, we had case studies to discuss: Ford company, HP, Ralph Lauren, and so on. We assumed that we were managers and analyzed the problems and solutions. We applied strategies that we learned from the textbook to solve problems. This is a very good part,” explains Boonpa Ing-Anuraksakul, from Thailand, studying Logistics Management at Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno, Nevada. The majority of MBA programs will have an internship requirement. Internships are an excellent way to really explore your future career and apply your studies. The companies for which you intern are thriving businesses and you will be working in a fast-paced environment. They will have professional expectations of you. While internships provide you with a practical learning environment, they are a prime setting for networking. Networking is one of the most powerful tools for your career. While you are an intern, take advantage of the opportunity to meet and network with current professionals. They may help you get a job or be your future colleagues. “An internship is a requirement in my curriculum. I believe this is helpful because the college encourages students to apply the skills outside the classroom and develop experience in the real world before graduating,” says Heejoong Kim, from Korea, studying Management and Marketing at Loyola University New Orleans. An internship will not only give you valuable experience, you will find that having a reputable American company listed on your resume will be invaluable. “When I graduate with my MBA, I will be competing in a very global job market. Having experience interacting with people from different cultures I believe will give me an edge in the professional world,” stated Juri Adrianto, from Indonesia, an MBA student in Information Systems at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Supply chain management is one of the fastest growing business specialties across the globe. The Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas has created a Supply chain management department where MBA students specialize in this popular career. In fact, the majority of international students in the Walton MBA choose to specialize in Supply Chain due to the quickly expanding global job market in the field and the international reputation of the faculty. MBA Supply Chain majors study subjects such as modeling, forecasting, transportation strategies and global logistics.The Walton College MBA program also allows them to customize the program with special workshops such as Negotiation Skills, Networking, RFID technologies and Advanced Access. The program also provides one-on-one personal coaching in resume writing, job interview skills, salary negotiations and how to create the best first impression. FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY A one-year accelerated MBA with a concentration in Global Business attracts students from around the world to Fairleigh Dickinson University, near New York City, because of its focus on managing a multinational workforce and expanding into global markets. Having met the highest standards, the program is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The MBA program features a curriculum that covers the models, theories, concepts and practices that successful organizations utilize to gain a competitive advantage within the framework of the global economy. Concepts are brought to reality for students, with structured corporate visits and a 10-day overseas business trip. LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS Loyola University New Orleans M.B.A. program prepares students to become leaders in both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in the increasingly global marketplace. The program is extremely flexible with student's schedules, allowing them to attend either full-time or part-time. Students are given advanced training in courses, such as: Leadership Dynamics, Ethical and Legal Responsibility, Advanced Financial Management, Global Supply Chain Management, Management Control and Decision-Making and Total Global Strategy. Partnerships with local businesses allow M.B.A. students to apply their studies outside of the classroom. Recently, the Entrepreneurial Consulting class partnered with the South Coast Angel Fund. Students' research and due diligence produced a $500K investment in a Social Media startup company. It’s time to take the next step in your professional life. Either your work experience, bachelor’s degree or career interests have all gathered together to show you what your next step in life is: your MBA. Doing a Master’s in Business Administration is a great way to direct your career into success, knowing that in most jobs having the MBA degree gets you ahead of the game. Today, there are more than 450 universities in the United States that offer MBA programs, and EduBookings can help you get admitted into hundreds of them and help you choose the top MBA colleges in America. Dozens of concentrations are also offered in many of the Business Schools, opening a world of opportunities to students. EduBookings works with over 120 universities in the United States, offering competitive and highly ranked MBA programs. Getting ready to apply for an MBA in the USA can be a little overwhelming. But that’s why international student’s agencies like EduBookings are here to help. We can make the entire process easier, better and get your acceptance letter faster, as oppose as doing it by yourself. Getting your documents ready, researching for minimum requirements, finding the right program for you, learning which standardized tests you need to take, and many more steps shouldn’t scare you and prevent you from doing your MBA in the USA. Understanding there is a lot to have in mind, we have prepared a list of things to take into consideration when studying abroad in the U.S and getting ready to apply for your MBA. Check the minimum requirements. Find out if you need to take the GMAT test, what is the minimum GPA required from your bachelor’s degree and if work experience is a requirement for admission. Make sure you meet the minimum criteria, as the MBA process is very competitive and if you don’t meet the criteria don’t get discouraged. EduBookings can help you waive some of the requirements or find the right university for you. Align your finances with your MBA plans and get your expectations right. Learn the cost of tuition, cost of living and calculate if it falls within your budget. Find out if there are employment options. While doing your MBA in the USA, most universities offer employment options to international students, such as teacher assistantships and mentor programs. This could be a relief to your finances and also a great way of practicing what you are learning. Learn how many international students are enrolled in your potential university. Intercultural socialization has been proven to help build a successful academic program. Dealing with different cultures and nationalities is a great way to open your mind to new experiences. Find out if the business school of your desired university is accredited. You want to make sure you will get the best value of your money when choosing a university to do your MBA in the USA. Having a national or international accreditation guarantees that the university is reputable and its Business program, well recognized. Check if you need a credential evaluation. Most universities need help understanding your degree from your country, course by course. For this reason, organizations such as WES offer a credential evaluation of your studies, an admission requirement for most MBA programs. The cost of this evaluation value between $200 and $300, approximately. Prepare a good resume. Showing work experience plays a key role in the admission departments of the universities. In some cases, 3 or more years of work experience can help you wave minimum requirements such as the GMAT or the minimum GPA. Choosing a concentration when planning your MBA in the U.S is quite important. Specializing your master’s can help you shape your career and paint a sharper panorama of your future as a working business professional. Here are some of the most popular MBA concentrations in the USA: ACCOUNTING FINANCE MARKETING REAL STATE DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS ANALYTICS INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS ENTREPRENEURSHIP HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OPERATION MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNET MARKETING NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP PUBLIC MANAGEMENT TAXATION LOOKING FOR AN EASY WAY TO FIND YOUR MBA CONCENTRATION? Finding the right concentration for your MBA in the United States can be difficult, which is why EduBookings.com has created this online search tool for international students looking to begin the MBA abroad. Take a second to look at the video below and learn for yourself how easy it can be to find the right university that fits your needs, using the tool below: When studying abroad, meeting people from all over the world is a crucial aspect of your education. Understanding the intricacies of all the cultures and nationalities can be a great opportunity for you to open your mind and learn from others. Also, knowing that the university is welcoming to international students, and diversity is integrated into their business programs is definitely key. Here are some of the Business Schools with most international students, according to the U.S News & World Report: Syracuse University with 73.1% of international students enrolled in The Martin J. Whitman School of Management. The University of Connecticut with 64.5% of international students. Pace University with 52.1% of international students enrolled in the Lubin School of Business The University of Tampa with 51.7% of international students enrolled in the John H. Sykes College of Business. The University of San Diego with 50.6% of international students. As a student or young professional, you may consider pursuing a Master of Business Administration. An MBA is a popular way to build business and management skills, while also advancing in your career. You gain many invaluable skills, build a strong network, open your career path and learn to think about industry trends and issues differently. An MBA helps set you up for success in the competitive business industry and offers you credibility. But before you decide to make the investment, here’s an outline of what you need to know about an MBA program. What is an MBA? A Master of Business Administration degree, also known as an MBA, is an internationally recognized degree with a focus on refining skills needed in business and management careers. An MBA provides students with practical experience needed to succeed in such roles. The program first began at Harvard University in the United States, and has grown into one of the most popular professional degree programs internationally. It’s most commonly offered in English and takes two years to complete as a full-time student, however it’s possible to enroll in a single-year MBA program. You may also complete an MBA as a part-time student if you’re unable to commit your time entirely. Individuals who have previous managerial experience in the industry may apply for the executive MBA program (EMBA). What are the admission requirements? Below you’ll find a list of the general requirements for an MBA program, however each school may differ. To learn specific details, please contact your host school or explore their website. Note: if you meet the minimum admission requirements, this does not guarantee you a secure spot in the program. An undergraduate degree from a recognized institution with a B average in the final two years of studies Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Minimum two years relevant work experience English language proficiency score in IELTS or TOEFL (if studies weren’t completed in English) Completion of school’s online application which may include the following: essay(s), statement of interest, recent resume, two (or more) references, transcripts, GMAT or GRE scores What courses to expect When you choose to pursue an MBA, you are provided with a much better understanding of the world of business. Some of the programs you will be enrolled in include the following: Finance Accounting Business Ethics Economics Marketing Organizational Behaviour Entrepreneurship Business Law Business Communication Why get an MBA? Leadership skills Leadership skills Students who enroll in an MBA program are learning alongside bright, driven, high-strung personalities. When it comes to group projects, you will gain a lot of experience in leadership and conflict resolution. Working in a group setting naturally provides you with communication skills and the ability to motivate others as you all have one goal in common. In addition, completing an MBA provides you with credibility and shows other industry professionals you are an expert in the field, and are dedicated to the industry. Build a network Build a network of like minded people On top of being taught by some of the best mentors in the industry, you are constantly surrounded by like minded individuals who you can discuss industry trends and issues with. You both challenge and learn from each other, and connect on different topics, creating a type of community. This network could be incredibly useful to you whether you are on the hunt for a new job or are in need of someone to brainstorm ideas with when building a business. In addition to this, the school’s name will further connect you to other industry professionals. Career opportunities Career opportunities Many pursue an MBA to expand their career options, because with such a degree comes new skills you can apply in a number of fields. Having an MBA also provides you with higher chances of securing a managerial role, which in turn may present a higher salary. Some individuals pursue an MBA with the idea they will one day own their own company. Many leaders in the Fortune 500 companies have completed an MBA. This is not to say an MBA will guarantee a successful billion dollar company, however it opens many doors. Different perspective Think Globally Completing an MBA enhances your knowledge in the business and management industry, and allows you to think globally about big business issues. You learn to reflect much deeper and think from various angles when it comes to trends and issues in the industry. This in turn allows you to develop and apply smart solutions. It’s important to offer a fresh and unique perspective to potential future employers and employees. This specifically sets you apart from your competitors. So, you must now decide if an MBA is worth it. Will it help advance your career? Do the courses interest you? Are you in search of a business school in Canada or the USA? Register with ApplyBoard and find out which business schools are the best fit for you. Curious to know what the top business schools in Canada are? Read about it in our blog here! Adrianna Dyczkowsky, Public Relations Specialist at ApplyBoard Tags: Higher Education, International Education, Management, Masters, MBA, students, study abroad One Comment Know the facts: Western University Ivey Business School - ApplyBoard […] Here’s what you need to know about a Master’s in Business Administration […] What is a Master of Business Administration? A Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is a graduate level degree awarded to students with an advanced knowledge of business. MBA's cultivate skills in leadership with a focus on courses such as accounting, finance, economics, marketing and more. Start Your Master of Business Administration with No GMAT Required In any business-related career field, the MBA degree is highly sought after. The Master of Business Administration program at GCU enhances a broad range of marketable skills that can give job applicants an edge. Many working professionals want to get started on an MBA program online but lack the time to study for the GMAT. The Colangelo College of Business addresses this issue by inviting you to apply for the MBA program, with no GMAT required. Future business leaders and executives will focus on leadership development, operations management and organizational growth. GCU filters these content areas through the lens of ethical decision-making and critical thinking with a Christian worldview. GCU is a regionally accredited, private university. The core programs from the Colangelo College of Business are approved by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs. The Benefits of Having an MBA The online MBA with no GMAT required offers a path for deepening your understanding of the business knowledge, skills and processes that fuel success. In this MBA program, you will enhance these skills: Transformational leadership Effective communication Ethical decision-making Critical thinking and analysis Productive networking This master’s in business administration program is designed with a broad range of business fields in mind. As an MBA candidate, you will develop transferable skills that can apply to any industry. Master of Business Administration Courses and Topics GCU is a modern school that embraces a 21st century style of learning. With our online MBA program, you do not have to choose between your career and your education. Take courses online and take part in small group discussions in a diverse, online classroom. This degree requires a total of 46 credits. Most of the MBA online classes are eight weeks long. The core program courses include: Leadership and Organizations Accounting Practices Finance Principles Applied Business Probability and Statistics Marketing Management Managerial Accounting Operations Management You will also study quantitative tools and techniques, managerial finance, strategic management and economics. The coursework includes individual and group projects, case studies, theories and applications. Some of the core ideas you will examine include: Sustainability in the global marketplace Behaviors and techniques of efficient operations The use of economic data for smart decision-making Asset evaluation The program explores the management of working capital and the raising of funds in capital markets, as well as financial forecasting. Job Opportunities with an MBA The MBA is a respected degree that increases the capabilities and credibility of job applicants. You may decide to pursue your MBA shortly after graduating from a bachelor’s program. Or, you may apply when it becomes apparent that having an MBA may be a path toward pursuing a career as an executive or manager. Some examples of career paths that can stem from an MBA degree may include: Entrepreneur/founder Chief executive officer Vice president of operations Director of operations Business leaders are often expected to have an MBA. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, 79 percent of all employers surveyed expected to hire MBA graduates in 2017. A Master of Business Administration program can also open doors to future executives who are pursuing networking opportunities. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, of all companies surveyed that implement internship programs, 66 percent planned to offer these opportunities to MBA students in 2017. The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree will dramatically expand one’s knowledge of business and is the academic ticket to greater opportunities for employment, promotions, and income. The M.B.A. encapsulates complex business analyses, the effect of current events on the global business environment, multicultural influences on business decision-making, and examining the functional areas of business in addressing management decisions. The program includes courses in accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and data analytics. An M.B.A. offers a well-rounded foundation for a career in the corporate world or the education arena. It is vital that the student who wishes to pursue the M.B.A. seek a university that has earned the AACSB accreditation—as has MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business, an acknowledgement that the program has passed rigorous standards that evaluate faculty qualifications, curricula, missions and objectives, and other aspects that have created a high-quality business regimen. Students pursuing the M.B.A. program also may choose from three concentrations in Healthcare Management, Music Business or Concrete Industry Management. The latter is open only to those individuals who have considerable experience in the concrete industry and related fields. The M.B.A. is also available in a flexible, 100% online format. Learn more about the online M.B.A. program. Full-time MBA programs normally take place over two academic years (i.e. approximately 18 months of term time). For example, in the Northern Hemisphere they often begin in late August or early September of year one and continue until May or June of year two, with a three to four month summer break in between years one and two. Students enter with a reasonable amount of prior real-world work experience and take classes during weekdays like other university students. A typical full-time, accelerated, part-time, or modular MBA requires 60 credits (600 class hours) of graduate work.[25] Accelerated MBA programs are a variation of the two-year programs. They involve a higher course load with more intense class and examination schedules and are usually condensed into one year. They usually have less down time during the program and between semesters. For example, there is no three to four-month summer break, and between semesters there might be seven to ten days off rather than three to five weeks vacation. Accelerated programs typically have a lower cost than full-time two-year programs. Part-time MBA programs normally hold classes on weekday evenings after normal working hours, or on weekends. Part-time programs normally last three years or more. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who take a light course load for a longer period of time until the graduation requirements are met. Evening (second shift) MBA programs are full-time programs that normally hold classes on weekday evenings, after normal working hours, or on weekends for a duration of two years. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who can not leave their work to pursue a full-time regular shift MBA. Most second shift programs are offered at universities in India. Modular MBA programs are similar to part-time programs, although typically employing a lock-step curriculum with classes packaged together in blocks lasting from one to three weeks. Executive MBA (EMBA) programs developed to meet the educational needs of managers and executives, allowing students to earn an MBA (or another business-related graduate degree) in two years or less while working full-time. Participants come from every type and size of organization – profit, nonprofit, government – representing a variety of industries. EMBA students typically have a higher level of work experience, often 10 years or more, compared to other MBA students. In response to the increasing number of EMBA programs offered, The Executive MBA Council was formed in 1981 to advance executive education. Full-time executive MBA programs are a new category of full-time 1 year MBA programs aimed at professionals with approx. 5 years or more. They are primarily offered in countries like India where the 2-year MBA program is targeted at fresh graduates with no experience or minimal experience. These full-time executive MBA programs are similar to 1 year MBA programs offered by schools like Insead and IMD. Distance learning MBA programs hold classes off-campus. These programs can be offered in a number of different formats: correspondence courses by postal mail or email, non-interactive broadcast video, pre-recorded video, live teleconference or videoconference, offline or online computer courses. Many schools offer these programs. Blended learning programs combine distance learning with face-to-face instruction.[26] These programs typically target working professionals who are unable to attend traditional part-time programs.[27] MBA dual degree programs combine an MBA with others (such as an MS, MA, or a JD, etc.) to let students cut costs (dual programs usually cost less than pursuing 2 degrees separately), save time on education and to tailor the business education courses to their needs. This is generally achieved by allowing core courses of one program count as electives in the other. Some business schools offer programs in which students can earn both a bachelor's degree in business administration and an MBA in five years. Mini-MBA is a term used by many non-profit and for-profit institutions to describe a training regimen focused on the fundamentals of business. In the past, Mini-MBA programs have typically been offered as non-credit bearing courses that require less than 100 hours of total learning. However, due to the criticisms of these certificates, many schools have now shifted their programs to offer courses for full credit so that they may be applied towards a complete traditional MBA degree. This is to allow students to verify business related coursework for employment purposes and still allow the option to complete a full-time MBA degree program at a later period, if they elect to do so. Life insurance (or life assurance, especially in the Commonwealth of Nations) is a contract between an insurance policy holder and an insurer or assurer, where the insurer promises to pay a designated beneficiary a sum of money (the benefit) in exchange for a premium, upon the death of an insured person (often the policy holder). Depending on the contract, other events such as terminal illness or critical illness can also trigger payment. The policy holder typically pays a premium, either regularly or as one lump sum. Other expenses, such as funeral expenses, can also be included in the benefits. Life policies are legal contracts and the terms of the contract describe the limitations of the insured events. Specific exclusions are often written into the contract to limit the liability of the insurer; common examples are claims relating to suicide, fraud, war, riot, and civil commotion. Life-based contracts tend to fall into two major categories: Protection policies – designed to provide a benefit, typically a lump sum payment, in the event of a specified occurrence. A common form—more common in years past—of a protection policy design is term insurance. Investment policies – the main objective of these policies is to facilitate the growth of capital by regular or single premiums. Common forms (in the U.S.) are whole life, universal life, and variable life policies. Parties to contract The person responsible for making payments for a policy is the policy owner, while the insured is the person whose death will trigger payment of the death benefit. The owner and insured may or may not be the same person. For example, if Joe buys a policy on his own life, he is both the owner and the insured. But if Jane, his wife, buys a policy on Joe's life, she is the owner and he is the insured. The policy owner is the guarantor and he will be the person to pay for the policy. The insured is a participant in the contract, but not necessarily a party to it. Chart of a life insurance The beneficiary receives policy proceeds upon the insured person's death. The owner designates the beneficiary, but the beneficiary is not a party to the policy. The owner can change the beneficiary unless the policy has an irrevocable beneficiary designation. If a policy has an irrevocable beneficiary, any beneficiary changes, policy assignments, or cash value borrowing would require the agreement of the original beneficiary. In cases where the policy owner is not the insured (also referred to as the celui qui vit or CQV), insurance companies have sought to limit policy purchases to those with an insurable interest in the CQV. For life insurance policies, close family members and business partners will usually be found to have an insurable interest. The insurable interest requirement usually demonstrates that the purchaser will actually suffer some kind of loss if the CQV dies. Such a requirement prevents people from benefiting from the purchase of purely speculative policies on people they expect to die. With no insurable interest requirement, the risk that a purchaser would murder the CQV for insurance proceeds would be great. In at least one case, an insurance company which sold a policy to a purchaser with no insurable interest (who later murdered the CQV for the proceeds), was found liable in court for contributing to the wrongful death of the victim (Liberty National Life v. Weldon, 267 Ala.171 (1957)). Contract terms Special exclusions may apply, such as suicide clauses, whereby the policy becomes null and void if the insured commits suicide within a specified time (usually two years after the purchase date; some states provide a statutory one-year suicide clause). Any misrepresentations by the insured on the application may also be grounds for nullification. Most US states specify a maximum contestability period, often no more than two years. Only if the insured dies within this period will the insurer have a legal right to contest the claim on the basis of misrepresentation and request additional information before deciding whether to pay or deny the claim. The face amount of the policy is the initial amount that the policy will pay at the death of the insured or when the policy matures, although the actual death benefit can provide for greater or lesser than the face amount. The policy matures when the insured dies or reaches a specified age (such as 100 years old). Costs, insurability, and underwriting The insurance company calculates the policy prices (premiums) at a level sufficient to fund claims, cover administrative costs, and provide a profit. The cost of insurance is determined using mortality tables calculated by actuaries. Mortality tables are statistically based tables showing expected annual mortality rates of people at different ages. Put simply, people are more likely to die as they get older and the mortality tables enable the insurance companies to calculate the risk and increase premiums with age accordingly. Such estimates can be important in taxation regulation.[8][9] In the 1980s and 1990s, the SOA 1975–80 Basic Select & Ultimate tables were the typical reference points, while the 2001 VBT and 2001 CSO tables were published more recently. As well as the basic parameters of age and gender, the newer tables include separate mortality tables for smokers and non-smokers, and the CSO tables include separate tables for preferred classes.[10] The mortality tables provide a baseline for the cost of insurance, but the health and family history of the individual applicant is also taken into account (except in the case of Group policies). This investigation and resulting evaluation is termed underwriting. Health and lifestyle questions are asked, with certain responses possibly meriting further investigation. Specific factors that may be considered by underwriters include: Personal medical history[11] Family medical history[12] Driving record[13] Height and weight matrix, otherwise known as BMI (Body Mass Index)[14] Based on the above and additional factors, applicants will be placed into one of several classes of health ratings which will determine the premium paid in exchange for insurance at that particular carrier.[13] Life insurance companies in the United States support the Medical Information Bureau (MIB),[15] which is a clearing house of information on persons who have applied for life insurance with participating companies in the last seven years. As part of the application, the insurer often requires the applicant's permission to obtain information from their physicians.[16] Automated Life Underwriting is a technology solution which is designed to perform all or some of the screening functions traditionally completed by underwriters, and thus seeks to reduce the work effort, time and/or data necessary to underwrite a life insurance application.[17] These systems allow point of sale distribution and can shorten the time frame for issuance from weeks or even months to hours or minutes, depending on the amount of insurance being purchased.[18] The mortality of underwritten persons rises much more quickly than the general population. At the end of 10 years, the mortality of that 25-year-old, non-smoking male is 0.66/1000/year. Consequently, in a group of one thousand 25-year-old males with a $100,000 policy, all of average health, a life insurance company would have to collect approximately $50 a year from each participant to cover the relatively few expected claims. (0.35 to 0.66 expected deaths in each year × $100,000 payout per death = $35 per policy.) Other costs, such as administrative and sales expenses, also need to be considered when setting the premiums. A 10-year policy for a 25-year-old non-smoking male with preferred medical history may get offers as low as $90 per year for a $100,000 policy in the competitive US life insurance market. Most of the revenue received by insurance companies consists of premiums, but revenue from investing the premiums forms an important source of profit for most life insurance companies. Group Insurance policies are an exception to this. In the United States, life insurance companies are never legally required to provide coverage to everyone, with the exception of Civil Rights Act compliance requirements. Insurance companies alone determine insurability, and some people are deemed uninsurable. The policy can be declined or rated (increasing the premium amount to compensate for the higher risk), and the amount of the premium will be proportional to the face value of the policy. Many companies separate applicants into four general categories. These categories are preferred best, preferred, standard, and tobacco. Preferred best is reserved only for the healthiest individuals in the general population. This may mean, that the proposed insured has no adverse medical history, is not under medication, and has no family history of early-onset cancer, diabetes, or other conditions.[19] Preferred means that the proposed insured is currently under medication and has a family history of particular illnesses. Most people are in the standard category. People in the tobacco category typically have to pay higher premiums due to the higher mortality. Recent US mortality tables predict that roughly 0.35 in 1,000 non-smoking males aged 25 will die during the first year of a policy.[20] Mortality approximately doubles for every extra ten years of age, so the mortality rate in the first year for non-smoking men is about 2.5 in 1,000 people at age 65.[20] Compare this with the US population male mortality rates of 1.3 per 1,000 at age 25 and 19.3 at age 65 (without regard to health or smoking status).[21] Death proceeds Upon the insured's death, the insurer requires acceptable proof of death before it pays the claim. The normal minimum proof required is a death certificate, and the insurer's claim form completed, signed, and typically notarized.[citation needed] If the insured's death is suspicious and the policy amount is large, the insurer may investigate the circumstances surrounding the death before deciding whether it has an obligation to pay the claim. Payment from the policy may be as a lump sum or as an annuity, which is paid in regular installments for either a specified period or for the beneficiary's lifetime.[22] Insurance vs assurance The specific uses of the terms "insurance" and "assurance" are sometimes confused. In general, in jurisdictions where both terms are used, "insurance" refers to providing coverage for an event that might happen (fire, theft, flood, etc.), while "assurance" is the provision of coverage for an event that is certain to happen. In the United States, both forms of coverage are called "insurance" for reasons of simplicity in companies selling both products.[citation needed] By some definitions, "insurance" is any coverage that determines benefits based on actual losses whereas "assurance" is coverage with predetermined benefits irrespective of the losses incurred. Life insurance may be divided into two basic classes: temporary and permanent; or the following subclasses: term, universal, whole life, and endowment life insurance. Term insurance Main article: Term life insurance Term assurance provides life insurance coverage for a specified term. The policy does not accumulate cash value. Term insurance is significantly less expensive than an equivalent permanent policy but will become higher with age. Policy holders can save to provide for increased term premiums or decrease insurance needs (by paying off debts or saving to provide for survivor needs).[23] Mortgage life insurance insures a loan secured by real property and usually features a level premium amount for a declining policy face value because what is insured is the principal and interest outstanding on a mortgage that is constantly being reduced by mortgage payments. The face amount of the policy is always the amount of the principal and interest outstanding that are paid should the applicant die before the final installment is paid. Group life insurance Group life insurance (also known as wholesale life insurance or institutional life insurance) is term insurance covering a group of people, usually employees of a company, members of a union or association, or members of a pension or superannuation fund. Individual proof of insurability is not normally a consideration in its underwriting. Rather, the underwriter considers the size, turnover, and financial strength of the group. Contract provisions will attempt to exclude the possibility of adverse selection. Group life insurance often allows members exiting the group to maintain their coverage by buying individual coverage. The underwriting is carried out for the whole group instead of individuals. Permanent life insurance Permanent life insurance is life insurance that covers the remaining lifetime of the insured. A permanent insurance policy accumulates a cash value up to its date of maturation. The owner can access the money in the cash value by withdrawing money, borrowing the cash value, or surrendering the policy and receiving the surrender value. The three basic types of permanent insurance are whole life, universal life, and endowment. Whole life Main article: Whole life insurance Whole life insurance provides lifetime coverage for a set premium amount (see main article for a full explanation of the many variations and options). Universal life coverage Universal life insurance (ULl) is a relatively new insurance product, intended to combine permanent insurance coverage with greater flexibility in premium payments, along with the potential for greater growth of cash values. There are several types of universal life insurance policies, including interest-sensitive (also known as "traditional fixed universal life insurance"), variable universal life (VUL), guaranteed death benefit, and has equity-indexed universal life insurance. Universal life insurance policies have cash values. Paid-in premiums increase their cash values; administrative and other costs reduce their cash values. Universal life insurance addresses the perceived disadvantages of whole life—namely that premiums and death benefits are fixed. With universal life, both the premiums and death benefit are flexible. With the exception of guaranteed-death-benefit universal life policies, universal life policies trade their greater flexibility off for fewer guarantees. "Flexible death benefit" means the policy owner can choose to decrease the death benefit. The death benefit can also be increased by the policy owner, usually requiring new underwriting. Another feature of flexible death benefit is the ability to choose option A or option B death benefits and to change those options over the course of the life of the insured. Option A is often referred to as a "level death benefit"; death benefits remain level for the life of the insured, and premiums are lower than policies with Option B death benefits, which pay the policy's cash value—i.e., a face amount plus earnings/interest. If the cash value grows over time, the death benefits do too. If the cash value declines, the death benefit also declines. Option B policies normally feature higher premiums than option A policies. Endowments Main article: Endowment policy The endowment policy is a life insurance contract designed to pay a lump sum after a specific term (on its 'maturity') or on death. Typical maturities are ten, fifteen or twenty years up to a certain age limit. Some policies also pay out in the case of critical illness. Policies are typically traditional with-profits or unit-linked (including those with unitized with-profits funds). Endowments can be cashed in early (or surrendered) and the holder then receives the surrender value which is determined by the insurance company depending on how long the policy has been running and how much has been paid into it. Accidental death Accidental death insurance is a type of limited life insurance that is designed to cover the insured should they die as the result of an accident. "Accidents" run the gamut from abrasions to catastrophes but normally do not include deaths resulting from non-accident-related health problems or suicide. Because they only cover accidents, these policies are much less expensive than other life insurance policies. Such insurance can also be accidental death and dismemberment insurance or AD&D. In an AD&D policy, benefits are available not only for accidental death but also for the loss of limbs or body functions such as sight and hearing. Accidental death and AD&D policies very rarely pay a benefit, either because the cause of death is not covered by the policy or because death occurs well after the accident, by which time the premiums have gone unpaid. To know what coverage they have, insureds should always review their policies. Risky activities such as parachuting, flying, professional sports, or military service are often omitted from coverage. Accidental death insurance can also supplement standard life insurance as a rider. If a rider is purchased, the policy generally pays double the face amount if the insured dies from an accident. This was once called double indemnity insurance. In some cases, triple indemnity coverage may be available. Senior and pre-need products Insurance companies have in recent years developed products for niche markets, most notably targeting seniors in an aging population. These are often low to moderate face value whole life insurance policies, allowing senior citizens to purchase affordable insurance later in life. This may also be marketed as final expense insurance and usually have death benefits between $2,000 and $40,000. One reason for their popularity is that they only require answers to simple "yes" or "no" questions, while most policies require a medical exam to qualify. As with other policy types, the range of premiums can vary widely and should be scrutinized prior to purchase, as should the reliability of the companies. Health questions can vary substantially between exam and no-exam policies. It may be possible for individuals with certain conditions to qualify for one type of coverage and not another.[citation needed] Because seniors sometimes are not fully aware of the policy provisions it is important to make sure that policies last for a lifetime and that premiums do not increase every 5 years as is common in some circumstances.[citation needed] Pre-need life insurance policies are limited premium payment, whole life policies that are usually purchased by older applicants, though they are available to everyone. This type of insurance is designed to cover specific funeral expenses that the applicant has designated in a contract with a funeral home. The policy's death benefit is initially based on the funeral cost at the time of prearrangement, and it then typically grows as interest is credited. In exchange for the policy owner's designation, the funeral home typically guarantees that the proceeds will cover the cost of the funeral, no matter when death occurs. Excess proceeds may go either to the insured's estate, a designated beneficiary, or the funeral home as set forth in the contract. Purchasers of these policies usually make a single premium payment at the time of prearrangement, but some companies also allow premiums to be paid over as much as ten years. A LEADER IN ATTORNEY, COPY & MESSENGER SERVICES For over two decades, Advanced Attorney Services, Inc. has been a leading Attorney, Copy and Messenger services provider in Southern California. With a wide range of business solutions offered, Advanced is committed to superior service standards by providing our clients with new and innovative methods of operating to ensure the highest quality of services available at competitive rates. If your firm is in need of immediate or same day court service, process service, deposition services, writ services, fax filings, E-Filings, messenger, on or off-site copy services, as well as a wide range of other services, allow Advanced Attorney Services to get the job done right.A lawyer referral service maintains a network of lawyers, and connects people in need of lawyers with its participating attorneys. A potential client who contacts a lawyer referral service is directed to a lawyer who practices in the area of law that is most appropriate for their situation. Some lawyer referral services charge a fee for providing a referral, while others provide referrals at no cost to the prospective client. Many referral services connect prospective clients with lawyers who have agreed to provide a low-cost or free initial consultation.[1] Referral services are often provided by state and local bar associations as a public service. Referral services may also be offered by non-profit organizations and advocacy groups. For-profit referral services[1] may connect lawyers with clients who pay a membership fee, or a fee for successfully referred clients, subject to rules against sharing fees with non-lawyers.[2] Historically, lawyer referral services involved prospective clients contacting a bar association or responding to an advertisement, by placing a telephone call to the service and seeking a referral. [3] With the internet boom in the 1990s, many consumers turned to the web to search for goods and services.[4] A research study released in 2012, shows that 76 percent of adult consumers looking for a lawyer used online resources at some point during the search process.[5]Some referral services provide referrals to lawyers in a broad range of areas of legal practice. Others may focus on referrals within a narrow range of practice areas, or a single practice area.[6] Online lawyer referral services are sometimes called attorney-client matching services. People who contact a service may be matched with one or more attorneys, based upon such factors as area of legal practice and geographic location. Lawyers who participate in these services may pay a fee for participation, a fee for each referral, or in some cases a percentage of the amount charged to a referred client.[7] In some cases the prospective client will be able to choose from a list of referred attorneys, while in other cases the referral will be made to a specific participating lawyer.[8] If a client is unable to afford a lawyer and the legal problem is not a matter that can be handled by a lawyer on a percentage fee basis, some referral services may attempt to match the client with a pro bono lawyer, or direct the client to contact a legal aid organization or law student clinic for help.[9] Ethical issues may arise for lawyers who participate in for-profit referral services, and state rules governing participation can vary significantly.[10][11][12] Some referral services are certified by bar associations,[13] including the American Bar Association.[14] Certified referral services must maintain standards of service as defined by the certifying organization. Among those standards, certification may require that participating lawyers meet minimum standards of experience, or maintain legal malpractice insurance. The American Bar Association provides a list attorney referral services that meet its certification requirements.[15] Some legal associations have expressed concern that lawyer referral services can lead to lawyers trying to undercut each other to get clients, rather than focusing on quality of service and the development of their reputation among their peers.[16] Another concern about lawyer referral services relates to client confidentiality. When a prospective client contacts a lawyer directly about retaining the lawyer's services, the communication is normally held absolutely confidential under principles of attorney-client privilege. Where a lawyer referral service collects information from a person who is seeking a lawyer, that information will not normally be confidential, raising the possibility that information provided to the referral service will be discoverable by the opposing party in any subsequent litigation.[17] Lawyer referral services may have minimal requirements for participation, and in some cases may not do any verification of a lawyer's qualification or credentials. As a consequence, it remains necessary for a person who uses a referral service to investigate a lawyer's qualification before retaining the lawyer.[7] Some controversy also arises from whether professional referral services are anti-competitive in nature.[citation needed] For instance, since Board Certified attorneys often charge a higher hourly rate than other competent general practitioners, if a Lawyer Referral Service requires Board Certification for certain types of referrals, instead of merely providing the public a choice between a Board Certified attorney and a competent attorney who is not Board Certified, the effect may be to restrict competition and restrict public choice and push up consumer prices.[citation needed] State bars, which license attorneys, may be complicit in restricting client choice.[citation needed] 5 Types of Insurance You Need, and 4 Types of Policies You Don’t Posted by Miranda Marquit Last updated on May 24, 2019 | Insurance Advertiser Disclosure: Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any other entity. This site may be compensated through the advertiser Affiliate Program. [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Insurance is an interesting industry. It is there to protect you, but it sometimes seems like a huge waste of resources if you don’t end up needing it. Of course, if you do end up with a serious problem, not having insurance could take an already difficult situation and turn it into a financial catastrophe. While you don’t need to insure against everything, there are a few insurance policies that you should have. The key is to recognize which insurance policies are the most essential to protect yourself and find a way to incorporate them into your budget. Not doing so is a gamble which can have a devastating financial impact if something happens. Table of Contents 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need 1. Auto Insurance 2. Life Insurance 3. Home/Rental Insurance 4. Health Insurance 5. Disability Insurance 6. Travel Insurance 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need 1. Life Insurance for Children 2. Mortgage Life Insurance 3. Credit Card Insurance 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need These are the types of insurance you need to insure against the largest threats to your budget in the event of an unexpected disaster: 1. Auto Insurance If you have a car, you need auto insurance – and not only because every state law requires that you carry it. For many people, their car is their only way to get to work; if it becomes un-drivable due to an accident, and the money isn’t available to buy a new one, it can be hard to earn a living. Additionally, if you are at fault in an accident, the liability you have could become very expensive. Your auto insurance policy may pay medical bills and property damage so that you wouldn’t be forced to come up with the money out of pocket, possibly resulting in financial ruin. The good news is auto insurance is a competitive industry. You can easily compare rates with different car insurance companies to find the best deal in your area. 2. Life Insurance Life insurance is probably the most important insurance policy you will ever purchase. It protects your loved ones by providing income for them in the event you pass on. It can also be a good idea to insure your life, even if you aren’t the primary breadwinner. After all, the duties of a stay-at-home spouse are worth quite a bit. Though you may not pay a stay-at-home spouse a salary, it would be expensive to replace everything they do to run the household. Consider your needs, and make sure that you have adequate life insurance. There are also other forms of life insurance such as Mortgage Life Insurance, check out our post on the pros and cons for your reference! 3. Home/Rental Insurance Your home represents a huge, expensive asset. If it’s damaged, it’ll cost you, big time. And depending on how bad the damage is, you might not be able to live there while repairs are being made. Depending on your policy, homeowners insurance can help you pay for home repairs, short-term lodging, or even a new home . . . without a huge outlay of capital all at once. Rental insurance is also a good idea, since the landlord’s property insurance usually only covers the structure and land, but not the contents of the rental property. Thankfully, rental insurance is usually very affordable, sometimes as low as $10 a month. At that price, you can’t afford to skip it. With whichever option you need you can get instant online quotes through Lemonade. They are changing the homeowners/renters insurance market with low instant rates. Get homeowners/renters insurance rates with Lemonade>> 4. Health Insurance If you are uninsured, you may be one hospital stay away from bankruptcy. Health insurance will help you offset some of the rising costs of health care – at least when it comes to large health needs. If you have a chronic condition, health insurance can help you better afford the care you need. Even if you are in good health, and rarely use health care services, it can be a good idea to at least have a policy that covers major medical problems, just in case an accident befalls you. Get Health Insurance Rates >> 5. Disability Insurance Statistics show that 1 in 4 people will become disabled at some point before they retire. Even though this statistic includes people who receive short term disability, it is an astounding number. This makes us ask the question, “Can I afford a short term or long term disability?” Is your emergency fund large enough to sustain no income for a month? What about two months, or three months, or six months? The average monthly benefit paid by Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is $1,065 per month. Will that be enough to support your family? Disability insurance can help cover the unknown situations, and it can be a good idea, especially if you are the primary breadwinner in your household or work in a high-risk industry. Should you have an injury that qualifies for your policy, your disability insurance will pay you while you are unable to work. Disability insurance policies often vary substantially between providers, so be sure to thoroughly review your policy to understand which situations qualify for benefits, how and when you qualify for payments, how much you will receive, etc. Typically, there is a waiting period of up to 30 days or longer before disability benefits kick in, so it is always good to have an emergency fund in place so you can have something to live on in the meantime. 6. Travel Insurance Yes, you may want to consider travel insurance, especially in certain situations. For example, let’s say you plan the trip of your lifetime, and you go all out, virtually without regard to your budget (which is extreme, I know). You may not want to have to worry about spending tens of thousands of dollars and have something come up with ruins the whole deal. For a small fee, you can hedge your bets here. Of course, if you’re planning a little weekend trip and making your travel by car, you might want to pass up any extra costs. 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need In one of my favorite episodes of the television show Family Guy, a slick door-to-door salesman convinces the bumbling Peter to purchase volcano insurance. When Peter first suggests that they’d never had volcano trouble in Rhode Island, the salesman responds “Don’t you think we’re due for one?” which of course ensures his sale. Even though it would take effort to be as naïve as Peter, there are definitely times when it’s difficult to know if the insurance you are considering is worth your money, or if it’s just another example of volcano insurance. Here are four insurance policies that you can feel comfortable skipping: 1. Life Insurance for Children The traditional purpose of life insurance is to financially provide for your family in the case of premature death. Since your children are not contributing financially to the family, and will most likely grow up to be safe and healthy, paying into premiums for their life insurance does not make sense. The money you would spend on premiums would be better spent in an emergency fund, a 529 plan for their education, or in an IRA. Exceptions: There are times when a life insurance policy for makes sense for children. This includes when your child earns an income and contributes to the family, or when you can get a very inexpensive rider on your life insurance policy. Otherwise, you may be better off skipping the life insurance policy for your children. 2. Mortgage Life Insurance On the surface, this seems like a reasonable policy. This insurance will pay off your mortgage in the event of your death, giving your family one less financial headache during a stressful time. However, a good life insurance policy should provide your heirs with enough money to handle the mortgage and any other bills that they will have to pay. There’s no need to purchase a separate policy for this—just make sure that your life insurance is adequate to cover your family’s needs. (caveat: mortgage life insurance can be a good idea if you have preexisting conditions and are ineligible for a term life insurance policy; otherwise, term is the way to go). 3. Credit Card Insurance For those who carry a balance on their credit card, having a policy that will pay your credit card bill in the event that you are unable to do so seems like a smart plan. The benefits of these plans are relatively limited, however, meaning you’re paying a monthly premium only to have your benefits capped and still be in debt. It makes much more sense to send the amount of the premium toward your bill and try to get your credit card paid off. You’ll save money on interest in addition to avoiding having to pay another bill. 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance The sad fact of the matter is that many medical insurance policies have holes in their coverage. Because of that, specific disease insurance policies—and specifically cancer insurance—have become popular over the past few years to take care of the gaps in regular medical coverage. The problem with these types of insurance is that they are so specific, and they do not necessarily cover everything related to the disease. For example, many cancer insurance policies do not cover skin cancers, which are the most common form of the disease. A better use of your money would be to upgrade your current health insurance. That way you’re covered no matter what happens. When it comes to insurance, always make sure you take the time to do some research into what you need and what will be covered before you sign on the dotted line. And beware volcano insurance salesmen! [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Are there other types of insurance people need (or should at least consider)? Leave a comment with your thoughts! Supply and Variable Charges No matter which tariff structure you select, your bill is usually divided into supply and variable charges. The supply charge is unaffected by your energy consumption. It is listed on your bill as a “supply charge” or “service charge,” and refers to a daily charge you receive regardless of how much energy you use. The supply charge is the charge you receive for being connected to the energy grid. Some suppliers offer discounts on the supply charge, which benefits households that don’t use very much energy. The second charge on your bill is a variable charge. Most of the time this appears as a “usage charge” on your bill. For electricity, suppliers charge based on cents per kilowatt hour (kWh). Most suppliers offer discounts on usage charges, which are usually the largest portion of your bill. Peak and Controlled Load Usage Peak and controlled load peak usage hours are two of the terms you’ll see a lot when looking at electricity consumption. They may appear on your bill whether or not your plan even includes peak and controlled load hours for billing purposes. Not all plans use peak and controlled load rates. Most suppliers allow you to select a single-rate tariff or a time of use tariff. The latter option takes peak usage into account. Single Rate Tariff A single rate tariff charges you the same amount for your energy consumption, regardless of the time of day you use the most energy. These plans are good for those who use the bulk of their electricity during peak hours. In contrast, a time of use plan charges higher rates during peak hours, so you’ll pay more for the energy you use during these times. Your electricity bill may still say ‘general usage’ even if you have a single rate tariff. In this case you’re not being charged more, it’s simply how the energy supplier categorises your energy use. Time of Use Tariff The time of use tariff divides the day into peak hours and controlled load hours. Peak hours vary depending on your supplier and your plan, but tend to be during times when more people are using electricity. For example, weekday afternoons and early evenings are likely to be peak times. Electricity usage is cheaper during controlled load hours and more expensive during peak times. Time of use plans tend to be better for those who use most of their energy in the morning or at night. If it’s feasible to do so, you could save money by waiting to use more electricity during controlled load hours. Block Pricing Your electricity supplier may charge you using block pricing. In this tariff type, your usage is broken into two or more blocks of kilowatt hours. Your supplier charges the first energy block at one rate. After you exceed the specified limit, you move into the second block and are charged a different rate. Some suppliers charge a lower rate for the first block and increase the rate for subsequent blocks, while other suppliers do the opposite. The majority of energy suppliers use two blocks for pricing, but some go as high as five. Block pricing can save you money if you can access a pricing model that suits your usage. Smaller households that don’t use much electricity may be able to stay within the first block and pay a lower rate. Larger households that use high amounts of electricity could benefit from block pricing that starts at a higher rate and decreases as usage goes up. A controlled load tariff is one of the more obscure tariffs you can find through electricity suppliers. It’s worth considering controlled load tariffs, because they could save you money. With a controlled load tariff, you are charged separately for the electricity used to power a specific appliance such as hot water or slab heating. The controlled load appliance runs on a separate circuit than the rest of your home, and may have its own meter. The supplier charges one rate for your normal electricity usage, and a different rate for the controlled load. The catch to controlled load tariffs is that the appliance can only be used during a specified time frame. In New South Wales and Queensland you can choose between controlled load one and controlled load 2: the first option is cheaper, but the second operates under a longer time frame. Controlled load tariffs are designed for appliances that don’t need to run continuously, which is why they work well for hot water systems. Can a Controlled Load Tariff Save You Money? Some suppliers, however, provide discounts with no strings attached. Weigh up these discounts carefully when making your decision. The amount of money you save will also depend on a few factors. Your location and the supplier’s rate will determine whether or not it’s worth separating one or two of your major appliances on a controlled load. To access a controlled load tariff, customers will typically need to make arrangements with their electricity provider. Mortgage rates are continuing their downward spiral. According to Freddie Mac, the average rate on a 30-year fixed-rate loan has dropped to just 3.82%—down from 4.54% last June and its lowest point in nearly two years. The dip presents a prime opportunity for buyers and existing homeowners alike. For those looking to get out of the rent race, it means the most affordable interest rates since September 2017. As Vishal Garg, CEO of digital mortgage lender Better.com, explains, “Now is the most opportune time to get a loan. If you’re renting, you’re simply paying your landlord’s mortgage.” For those who already own a home, the rate drop could mean serious financial savings over time. In fact, according to data and analytics firm Black Knight, nearly every mortgage loan originated in 2018 could see a rate drop via refinancing. In total, a whopping 6.8 million homeowners could now qualify for a refinance and save at least 75 basis points—or around $268 per month. Less than two months ago, just 2 million homeowners could see these kinds of savings. Still, it’s not all about the rate. Refinance-eligible homeowners also have a chance to leverage their home equity. As Garg says, it’s “a rare opportunity for Americans to improve their financial health.” “If you have any other type of debt—car loan, credit card, student loan—and you own a home, you can tap into the equity of your home to pay off these other higher-interest loans,” Garg said. But experts caution that Freddie Mac’s average rate is just that—an average. Rates vary greatly from lender to lender, and a borrower's credit, debts and other factors all play a role in mortgage rates as well. In order to get the best rate possible, Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist Sam Khafer says shopping around is key. “While the drop in mortgage rates is a good opportunity for consumers to save on their mortgage payment, our research indicates that there can be a wide dispersion among mortgage rate offers,” he said. Khater estimates the average buyer can save around $1,500 up front by getting just one additional mortgage quote. Over the life of a 30-year loan, shopping around can save buyers more than $44,000, according to LendingTree's most recent Mortgage Comparison Shopping Report. That is both an easy and complex question, so let's do easy first: As a rule, in the United States the terms lawyer and attorney are interchangeable. Now for the hard answer. It's hard because we have to go back a bit in history to understand the distinctions. The term "lawyer" was generally used to refer to any person who has studied and been trained in the law. The lawyers of the early U.S. nationhood are a good example. Someone like John Adams or Thomas Jefferson were not only leaders of the American Revolution but they also were lawyers. An interesting note on Adams's career is that he actually provided a learned, principled, and successful defense of the British soldiers accused of crimes arising from the Boston Massacre. His reason was the same that many criminal defense attorneys cite today for their own careers. Every person, no matter how they are seen by the general public, deserves a zealous and competent defense (something we now find in the Sixth Amendment of the Constitution). As education in the U.S. improved and law began to become its own discipline, the term "attorney at law" (also attorney-at-law) was created around 1768. For a short time there was an effort to distinguish the two terms. The lawyer was one who studied and graduated after studying law, however, they were not necessarily seen as someone who had passed the bar; therefore they did not "practice law" before a court. Even today we see that one can graduate from an American law school, thus becoming a lawyer, but not pass the bar exam. Without the passing score on the bar exam, one can't be admitted to practice law in the jurisdiction (state or federal). The attorney at law, which was later shortened to just attorney, was used in some instances to mean a professional who is qualified to give legal advice and to represent a party in court. Eventually, the early form of the law degree (which was considered a professional degree much like that for the ministry or medicine) evolved to a point that it would require a much higher level of education in order to be reasonably qualified. Today, the terms attorney and lawyer are used interchangeably, mostly because the need to distinguish the right to practice law became so well defined with the expansion of the individual jurisdictions judicial system and also because the qualifying degree today to sit for the bar exam is a professional doctorate degree; usually the Juris Doctorate or J.D. There are still those who graduate from law school but never sit for the bar exam. The law degree is an excellent degree which can be used in many areas of business and government work other than the practice of law. Thus, the concept that one is a lawyer by virtue of the law degree still exists, it is just not enforced as enthusiastically as in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Sin embargo, ahora los familiares del violador y delincuente, se han querellado en la justicia en contra de las personas de ese sector, por lo que le hicieron a Aneuris Arias

El Individuo está hospitalizado en el Moscoso Puello con golpes y profundas heridas cortantes en todo el cuerpo.

one of the most useful postgraduate degrees an international student can earn is a Master of Business Administration (MBA). This degree opens many doors regarding your employment, or any business endeavors you wish to pursue. MBAs are available to students who have already earned a bachelor's degree. Whatever your reason for considering earning an MBA, you’re going to want to begin the process having answered some key questions: What is an MBA? Why earn an MBA? How can an MBA benefit your career? How do you begin? What is an MBA? The MBA degree is widely believed to be one of the most prestigious and sought-after degrees in the world. Students of MBA programs study the theory and application of business and management principles. This type of study equips students with knowledge that can be applied to a variety of real-world business industries and situations.​ Why earn an MBA? Students may ask, what is an MBA for? In today's fast-paced economy, the MBA is the most popular professional degree around the world. The program blends advanced skills in business and management with real-world experience to prepare graduates for starting or advancing in a management career in any field they choose. In many cases, an MBA degree is required for executive and senior management positions. There are some companies who will not even consider applicants unless they have an MBA degree. Business school professors say MBA programs help students develop the skills required to excel as business executives, such as the ability to quickly and accurately analyze large amounts of information and the ability to develop smart solutions to business problems. How can an MBA benefit your career? Some of the reasons and benefits include: Advancing your career - This can mean a number of different things. In a circumstance where you have worked with a company and earned an MBA later on in your employment with them, you can leverage your position into a more prominent role. The best way to do so would be to keep an eye for in-house promotions that you could see yourself advancing to and being prepared to apply for it with your new credentials. An MBA is highly esteemed in nearly any industry and will often fast track you to better opportunities. Developing your business savvy - Your MBA will help in growing your professional network. You will come across many opportunities to connect with other MBAs and companies seeking to work with an MBA graduate. Utilizing the skills you learn from having an MBA will be invaluable in helping you with job security. Your degree will often make you an indispensable team member. Leading in an emerging field - Often these days, knowing an industry versus knowing how to maneuver in that industry with expertise will be the quality employers will seek. Many people can be taught how to work in specific industries, but not everyone will have the capacity to lead in said industries. Equipped with your MBA, you will likely be a frontrunner in any leading role in a field that is still budding. Starting your own business - Becoming an entrepreneur might be one of the most popular reasons to earn an MBA. To excel as an entrepreneur, you’ll need to learn to communicate effectively and persuasively. For many people, these skills don’t come naturally, but now more than ever, business schools have come to realize how critical it is for their students to graduate with the personal skills required for effective leadership. Business school is also the safest place to test out your most creative, outrageous, and ambitious ideas without the pressure and fear of failure if that company or those ideas don't work. You'll have teachers and mentors guiding you along the way as you search for your big idea. How do you begin? You’ll want to begin by choosing a school. When searching for a college or university in the US to pursue an MBA, here are a few things to consider: A good place to start is program length. There are a few options on what to pursue and how when it comes to an MBA. Full-time MBA programs in the US typically take two years to complete, but many programs also have one-year, accelerated options. Part-time MBA programs allow the flexibility of attending evening and/or weekend classes to accommodate to life’s busy schedule. Accelerated MBA programs are another recent addition to the MBA in the US offerings. Targeted at students with a background in business education (or the ability to make up for lost time through self-study), accelerated MBA programs in the US can take anywhere from 12-18 months to complete. Because of their emphasis on speed they spend considerably less time reviewing introductory material and eliminate many opportunities for degree specialization. Your options are plentiful, but many people will consider rankings and student satisfaction when choosing a school. Schools throughout the US such as Auburn University in Alabama, American University in Washington, DC, Emory University in Georgia, or Purdue University in Indiana that are ranked in the top 100 schools for MBAs are good ones to consider. Once you find an MBA program you want to... Begin the application process. There are actually three stages to the admissions cycle: pre-application, application, and post-application. Some business schools also give prospective MBAs three different application deadlines by separating the admissions season into rounds. Being aware of when each round occurs lets prospective students know when to complete the GMAT, get letters of recommendation, and prepare all other material required for admissions. If you have the chance to interview for programs where there’s the option to do so, be sure to take advantage. Like most application processes your resume, recommendations, and a completed application are required. Beyond the standard, an MBA application will include essays, transcripts, and GMAT scores. The goal for applicants is to present a strong application across all the evaluation materials. The stronger each element of the application is the higher the chance of being admitted in an MBA program in the USA. Most American business schools-regardless of the major focus-will train you in the principles of general business management. These principles include a combination of accounting, economics, finance, marketing and statistics, among other topics. American universities also offer a wealth of specialized M.B.A. programs and classes to tailor your degree. Depending on your intended career goals, you'll find programs that offer a more focused approach, including business administration, finance, human resources, information technology, marketing, nonprofit administration, and more. THEORY IN PRACTICE At every level, the American higher education system is different. Foundational principles and theories must be taught, but they are only mastered through practice. MBA programs in the United States strongly reflect this teaching philosophy. You will examine real-world case studies and business scenarios in order to devise strategies, business plans, budgets, etc. These types of projects will prepare you for real-life business situations and to approach them with practical knowledge. “In logistics management class, we had case studies to discuss: Ford company, HP, Ralph Lauren, and so on. We assumed that we were managers and analyzed the problems and solutions. We applied strategies that we learned from the textbook to solve problems. This is a very good part,” explains Boonpa Ing-Anuraksakul, from Thailand, studying Logistics Management at Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno, Nevada. The majority of MBA programs will have an internship requirement. Internships are an excellent way to really explore your future career and apply your studies. The companies for which you intern are thriving businesses and you will be working in a fast-paced environment. They will have professional expectations of you. While internships provide you with a practical learning environment, they are a prime setting for networking. Networking is one of the most powerful tools for your career. While you are an intern, take advantage of the opportunity to meet and network with current professionals. They may help you get a job or be your future colleagues. “An internship is a requirement in my curriculum. I believe this is helpful because the college encourages students to apply the skills outside the classroom and develop experience in the real world before graduating,” says Heejoong Kim, from Korea, studying Management and Marketing at Loyola University New Orleans. An internship will not only give you valuable experience, you will find that having a reputable American company listed on your resume will be invaluable. “When I graduate with my MBA, I will be competing in a very global job market. Having experience interacting with people from different cultures I believe will give me an edge in the professional world,” stated Juri Adrianto, from Indonesia, an MBA student in Information Systems at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Supply chain management is one of the fastest growing business specialties across the globe. The Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas has created a Supply chain management department where MBA students specialize in this popular career. In fact, the majority of international students in the Walton MBA choose to specialize in Supply Chain due to the quickly expanding global job market in the field and the international reputation of the faculty. MBA Supply Chain majors study subjects such as modeling, forecasting, transportation strategies and global logistics.The Walton College MBA program also allows them to customize the program with special workshops such as Negotiation Skills, Networking, RFID technologies and Advanced Access. The program also provides one-on-one personal coaching in resume writing, job interview skills, salary negotiations and how to create the best first impression. FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY A one-year accelerated MBA with a concentration in Global Business attracts students from around the world to Fairleigh Dickinson University, near New York City, because of its focus on managing a multinational workforce and expanding into global markets. Having met the highest standards, the program is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The MBA program features a curriculum that covers the models, theories, concepts and practices that successful organizations utilize to gain a competitive advantage within the framework of the global economy. Concepts are brought to reality for students, with structured corporate visits and a 10-day overseas business trip. LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS Loyola University New Orleans M.B.A. program prepares students to become leaders in both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in the increasingly global marketplace. The program is extremely flexible with student's schedules, allowing them to attend either full-time or part-time. Students are given advanced training in courses, such as: Leadership Dynamics, Ethical and Legal Responsibility, Advanced Financial Management, Global Supply Chain Management, Management Control and Decision-Making and Total Global Strategy. Partnerships with local businesses allow M.B.A. students to apply their studies outside of the classroom. Recently, the Entrepreneurial Consulting class partnered with the South Coast Angel Fund. Students' research and due diligence produced a $500K investment in a Social Media startup company. It’s time to take the next step in your professional life. Either your work experience, bachelor’s degree or career interests have all gathered together to show you what your next step in life is: your MBA. Doing a Master’s in Business Administration is a great way to direct your career into success, knowing that in most jobs having the MBA degree gets you ahead of the game. Today, there are more than 450 universities in the United States that offer MBA programs, and EduBookings can help you get admitted into hundreds of them and help you choose the top MBA colleges in America. Dozens of concentrations are also offered in many of the Business Schools, opening a world of opportunities to students. EduBookings works with over 120 universities in the United States, offering competitive and highly ranked MBA programs. Getting ready to apply for an MBA in the USA can be a little overwhelming. But that’s why international student’s agencies like EduBookings are here to help. We can make the entire process easier, better and get your acceptance letter faster, as oppose as doing it by yourself. Getting your documents ready, researching for minimum requirements, finding the right program for you, learning which standardized tests you need to take, and many more steps shouldn’t scare you and prevent you from doing your MBA in the USA. Understanding there is a lot to have in mind, we have prepared a list of things to take into consideration when studying abroad in the U.S and getting ready to apply for your MBA. Check the minimum requirements. Find out if you need to take the GMAT test, what is the minimum GPA required from your bachelor’s degree and if work experience is a requirement for admission. Make sure you meet the minimum criteria, as the MBA process is very competitive and if you don’t meet the criteria don’t get discouraged. EduBookings can help you waive some of the requirements or find the right university for you. Align your finances with your MBA plans and get your expectations right. Learn the cost of tuition, cost of living and calculate if it falls within your budget. Find out if there are employment options. While doing your MBA in the USA, most universities offer employment options to international students, such as teacher assistantships and mentor programs. This could be a relief to your finances and also a great way of practicing what you are learning. Learn how many international students are enrolled in your potential university. Intercultural socialization has been proven to help build a successful academic program. Dealing with different cultures and nationalities is a great way to open your mind to new experiences. Find out if the business school of your desired university is accredited. You want to make sure you will get the best value of your money when choosing a university to do your MBA in the USA. Having a national or international accreditation guarantees that the university is reputable and its Business program, well recognized. Check if you need a credential evaluation. Most universities need help understanding your degree from your country, course by course. For this reason, organizations such as WES offer a credential evaluation of your studies, an admission requirement for most MBA programs. The cost of this evaluation value between $200 and $300, approximately. Prepare a good resume. Showing work experience plays a key role in the admission departments of the universities. In some cases, 3 or more years of work experience can help you wave minimum requirements such as the GMAT or the minimum GPA. Choosing a concentration when planning your MBA in the U.S is quite important. Specializing your master’s can help you shape your career and paint a sharper panorama of your future as a working business professional. Here are some of the most popular MBA concentrations in the USA: ACCOUNTING FINANCE MARKETING REAL STATE DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS ANALYTICS INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS ENTREPRENEURSHIP HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OPERATION MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNET MARKETING NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP PUBLIC MANAGEMENT TAXATION LOOKING FOR AN EASY WAY TO FIND YOUR MBA CONCENTRATION? Finding the right concentration for your MBA in the United States can be difficult, which is why EduBookings.com has created this online search tool for international students looking to begin the MBA abroad. Take a second to look at the video below and learn for yourself how easy it can be to find the right university that fits your needs, using the tool below: When studying abroad, meeting people from all over the world is a crucial aspect of your education. Understanding the intricacies of all the cultures and nationalities can be a great opportunity for you to open your mind and learn from others. Also, knowing that the university is welcoming to international students, and diversity is integrated into their business programs is definitely key. Here are some of the Business Schools with most international students, according to the U.S News & World Report: Syracuse University with 73.1% of international students enrolled in The Martin J. Whitman School of Management. The University of Connecticut with 64.5% of international students. Pace University with 52.1% of international students enrolled in the Lubin School of Business The University of Tampa with 51.7% of international students enrolled in the John H. Sykes College of Business. The University of San Diego with 50.6% of international students. As a student or young professional, you may consider pursuing a Master of Business Administration. An MBA is a popular way to build business and management skills, while also advancing in your career. You gain many invaluable skills, build a strong network, open your career path and learn to think about industry trends and issues differently. An MBA helps set you up for success in the competitive business industry and offers you credibility. But before you decide to make the investment, here’s an outline of what you need to know about an MBA program. What is an MBA? A Master of Business Administration degree, also known as an MBA, is an internationally recognized degree with a focus on refining skills needed in business and management careers. An MBA provides students with practical experience needed to succeed in such roles. The program first began at Harvard University in the United States, and has grown into one of the most popular professional degree programs internationally. It’s most commonly offered in English and takes two years to complete as a full-time student, however it’s possible to enroll in a single-year MBA program. You may also complete an MBA as a part-time student if you’re unable to commit your time entirely. Individuals who have previous managerial experience in the industry may apply for the executive MBA program (EMBA). What are the admission requirements? Below you’ll find a list of the general requirements for an MBA program, however each school may differ. To learn specific details, please contact your host school or explore their website. Note: if you meet the minimum admission requirements, this does not guarantee you a secure spot in the program. An undergraduate degree from a recognized institution with a B average in the final two years of studies Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Minimum two years relevant work experience English language proficiency score in IELTS or TOEFL (if studies weren’t completed in English) Completion of school’s online application which may include the following: essay(s), statement of interest, recent resume, two (or more) references, transcripts, GMAT or GRE scores What courses to expect When you choose to pursue an MBA, you are provided with a much better understanding of the world of business. Some of the programs you will be enrolled in include the following: Finance Accounting Business Ethics Economics Marketing Organizational Behaviour Entrepreneurship Business Law Business Communication Why get an MBA? Leadership skills Leadership skills Students who enroll in an MBA program are learning alongside bright, driven, high-strung personalities. When it comes to group projects, you will gain a lot of experience in leadership and conflict resolution. Working in a group setting naturally provides you with communication skills and the ability to motivate others as you all have one goal in common. In addition, completing an MBA provides you with credibility and shows other industry professionals you are an expert in the field, and are dedicated to the industry. Build a network Build a network of like minded people On top of being taught by some of the best mentors in the industry, you are constantly surrounded by like minded individuals who you can discuss industry trends and issues with. You both challenge and learn from each other, and connect on different topics, creating a type of community. This network could be incredibly useful to you whether you are on the hunt for a new job or are in need of someone to brainstorm ideas with when building a business. In addition to this, the school’s name will further connect you to other industry professionals. Career opportunities Career opportunities Many pursue an MBA to expand their career options, because with such a degree comes new skills you can apply in a number of fields. Having an MBA also provides you with higher chances of securing a managerial role, which in turn may present a higher salary. Some individuals pursue an MBA with the idea they will one day own their own company. Many leaders in the Fortune 500 companies have completed an MBA. This is not to say an MBA will guarantee a successful billion dollar company, however it opens many doors. Different perspective Think Globally Completing an MBA enhances your knowledge in the business and management industry, and allows you to think globally about big business issues. You learn to reflect much deeper and think from various angles when it comes to trends and issues in the industry. This in turn allows you to develop and apply smart solutions. It’s important to offer a fresh and unique perspective to potential future employers and employees. This specifically sets you apart from your competitors. So, you must now decide if an MBA is worth it. Will it help advance your career? Do the courses interest you? Are you in search of a business school in Canada or the USA? Register with ApplyBoard and find out which business schools are the best fit for you. Curious to know what the top business schools in Canada are? Read about it in our blog here! Adrianna Dyczkowsky, Public Relations Specialist at ApplyBoard Tags: Higher Education, International Education, Management, Masters, MBA, students, study abroad One Comment Know the facts: Western University Ivey Business School - ApplyBoard […] Here’s what you need to know about a Master’s in Business Administration […] What is a Master of Business Administration? A Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is a graduate level degree awarded to students with an advanced knowledge of business. MBA's cultivate skills in leadership with a focus on courses such as accounting, finance, economics, marketing and more. Start Your Master of Business Administration with No GMAT Required In any business-related career field, the MBA degree is highly sought after. The Master of Business Administration program at GCU enhances a broad range of marketable skills that can give job applicants an edge. Many working professionals want to get started on an MBA program online but lack the time to study for the GMAT. The Colangelo College of Business addresses this issue by inviting you to apply for the MBA program, with no GMAT required. Future business leaders and executives will focus on leadership development, operations management and organizational growth. GCU filters these content areas through the lens of ethical decision-making and critical thinking with a Christian worldview. GCU is a regionally accredited, private university. The core programs from the Colangelo College of Business are approved by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs. The Benefits of Having an MBA The online MBA with no GMAT required offers a path for deepening your understanding of the business knowledge, skills and processes that fuel success. In this MBA program, you will enhance these skills: Transformational leadership Effective communication Ethical decision-making Critical thinking and analysis Productive networking This master’s in business administration program is designed with a broad range of business fields in mind. As an MBA candidate, you will develop transferable skills that can apply to any industry. Master of Business Administration Courses and Topics GCU is a modern school that embraces a 21st century style of learning. With our online MBA program, you do not have to choose between your career and your education. Take courses online and take part in small group discussions in a diverse, online classroom. This degree requires a total of 46 credits. Most of the MBA online classes are eight weeks long. The core program courses include: Leadership and Organizations Accounting Practices Finance Principles Applied Business Probability and Statistics Marketing Management Managerial Accounting Operations Management You will also study quantitative tools and techniques, managerial finance, strategic management and economics. The coursework includes individual and group projects, case studies, theories and applications. Some of the core ideas you will examine include: Sustainability in the global marketplace Behaviors and techniques of efficient operations The use of economic data for smart decision-making Asset evaluation The program explores the management of working capital and the raising of funds in capital markets, as well as financial forecasting. Job Opportunities with an MBA The MBA is a respected degree that increases the capabilities and credibility of job applicants. You may decide to pursue your MBA shortly after graduating from a bachelor’s program. Or, you may apply when it becomes apparent that having an MBA may be a path toward pursuing a career as an executive or manager. Some examples of career paths that can stem from an MBA degree may include: Entrepreneur/founder Chief executive officer Vice president of operations Director of operations Business leaders are often expected to have an MBA. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, 79 percent of all employers surveyed expected to hire MBA graduates in 2017. A Master of Business Administration program can also open doors to future executives who are pursuing networking opportunities. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, of all companies surveyed that implement internship programs, 66 percent planned to offer these opportunities to MBA students in 2017. The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree will dramatically expand one’s knowledge of business and is the academic ticket to greater opportunities for employment, promotions, and income. The M.B.A. encapsulates complex business analyses, the effect of current events on the global business environment, multicultural influences on business decision-making, and examining the functional areas of business in addressing management decisions. The program includes courses in accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and data analytics. An M.B.A. offers a well-rounded foundation for a career in the corporate world or the education arena. It is vital that the student who wishes to pursue the M.B.A. seek a university that has earned the AACSB accreditation—as has MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business, an acknowledgement that the program has passed rigorous standards that evaluate faculty qualifications, curricula, missions and objectives, and other aspects that have created a high-quality business regimen. Students pursuing the M.B.A. program also may choose from three concentrations in Healthcare Management, Music Business or Concrete Industry Management. The latter is open only to those individuals who have considerable experience in the concrete industry and related fields. The M.B.A. is also available in a flexible, 100% online format. Learn more about the online M.B.A. program. Full-time MBA programs normally take place over two academic years (i.e. approximately 18 months of term time). For example, in the Northern Hemisphere they often begin in late August or early September of year one and continue until May or June of year two, with a three to four month summer break in between years one and two. Students enter with a reasonable amount of prior real-world work experience and take classes during weekdays like other university students. A typical full-time, accelerated, part-time, or modular MBA requires 60 credits (600 class hours) of graduate work.[25] Accelerated MBA programs are a variation of the two-year programs. They involve a higher course load with more intense class and examination schedules and are usually condensed into one year. They usually have less down time during the program and between semesters. For example, there is no three to four-month summer break, and between semesters there might be seven to ten days off rather than three to five weeks vacation. Accelerated programs typically have a lower cost than full-time two-year programs. Part-time MBA programs normally hold classes on weekday evenings after normal working hours, or on weekends. Part-time programs normally last three years or more. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who take a light course load for a longer period of time until the graduation requirements are met. Evening (second shift) MBA programs are full-time programs that normally hold classes on weekday evenings, after normal working hours, or on weekends for a duration of two years. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who can not leave their work to pursue a full-time regular shift MBA. Most second shift programs are offered at universities in India. Modular MBA programs are similar to part-time programs, although typically employing a lock-step curriculum with classes packaged together in blocks lasting from one to three weeks. Executive MBA (EMBA) programs developed to meet the educational needs of managers and executives, allowing students to earn an MBA (or another business-related graduate degree) in two years or less while working full-time. Participants come from every type and size of organization – profit, nonprofit, government – representing a variety of industries. EMBA students typically have a higher level of work experience, often 10 years or more, compared to other MBA students. In response to the increasing number of EMBA programs offered, The Executive MBA Council was formed in 1981 to advance executive education. Full-time executive MBA programs are a new category of full-time 1 year MBA programs aimed at professionals with approx. 5 years or more. They are primarily offered in countries like India where the 2-year MBA program is targeted at fresh graduates with no experience or minimal experience. These full-time executive MBA programs are similar to 1 year MBA programs offered by schools like Insead and IMD. Distance learning MBA programs hold classes off-campus. These programs can be offered in a number of different formats: correspondence courses by postal mail or email, non-interactive broadcast video, pre-recorded video, live teleconference or videoconference, offline or online computer courses. Many schools offer these programs. Blended learning programs combine distance learning with face-to-face instruction.[26] These programs typically target working professionals who are unable to attend traditional part-time programs.[27] MBA dual degree programs combine an MBA with others (such as an MS, MA, or a JD, etc.) to let students cut costs (dual programs usually cost less than pursuing 2 degrees separately), save time on education and to tailor the business education courses to their needs. This is generally achieved by allowing core courses of one program count as electives in the other. Some business schools offer programs in which students can earn both a bachelor's degree in business administration and an MBA in five years. Mini-MBA is a term used by many non-profit and for-profit institutions to describe a training regimen focused on the fundamentals of business. In the past, Mini-MBA programs have typically been offered as non-credit bearing courses that require less than 100 hours of total learning. However, due to the criticisms of these certificates, many schools have now shifted their programs to offer courses for full credit so that they may be applied towards a complete traditional MBA degree. This is to allow students to verify business related coursework for employment purposes and still allow the option to complete a full-time MBA degree program at a later period, if they elect to do so. Life insurance (or life assurance, especially in the Commonwealth of Nations) is a contract between an insurance policy holder and an insurer or assurer, where the insurer promises to pay a designated beneficiary a sum of money (the benefit) in exchange for a premium, upon the death of an insured person (often the policy holder). Depending on the contract, other events such as terminal illness or critical illness can also trigger payment. The policy holder typically pays a premium, either regularly or as one lump sum. Other expenses, such as funeral expenses, can also be included in the benefits. Life policies are legal contracts and the terms of the contract describe the limitations of the insured events. Specific exclusions are often written into the contract to limit the liability of the insurer; common examples are claims relating to suicide, fraud, war, riot, and civil commotion. Life-based contracts tend to fall into two major categories: Protection policies – designed to provide a benefit, typically a lump sum payment, in the event of a specified occurrence. A common form—more common in years past—of a protection policy design is term insurance. Investment policies – the main objective of these policies is to facilitate the growth of capital by regular or single premiums. Common forms (in the U.S.) are whole life, universal life, and variable life policies. Parties to contract The person responsible for making payments for a policy is the policy owner, while the insured is the person whose death will trigger payment of the death benefit. The owner and insured may or may not be the same person. For example, if Joe buys a policy on his own life, he is both the owner and the insured. But if Jane, his wife, buys a policy on Joe's life, she is the owner and he is the insured. The policy owner is the guarantor and he will be the person to pay for the policy. The insured is a participant in the contract, but not necessarily a party to it. Chart of a life insurance The beneficiary receives policy proceeds upon the insured person's death. The owner designates the beneficiary, but the beneficiary is not a party to the policy. The owner can change the beneficiary unless the policy has an irrevocable beneficiary designation. If a policy has an irrevocable beneficiary, any beneficiary changes, policy assignments, or cash value borrowing would require the agreement of the original beneficiary. In cases where the policy owner is not the insured (also referred to as the celui qui vit or CQV), insurance companies have sought to limit policy purchases to those with an insurable interest in the CQV. For life insurance policies, close family members and business partners will usually be found to have an insurable interest. The insurable interest requirement usually demonstrates that the purchaser will actually suffer some kind of loss if the CQV dies. Such a requirement prevents people from benefiting from the purchase of purely speculative policies on people they expect to die. With no insurable interest requirement, the risk that a purchaser would murder the CQV for insurance proceeds would be great. In at least one case, an insurance company which sold a policy to a purchaser with no insurable interest (who later murdered the CQV for the proceeds), was found liable in court for contributing to the wrongful death of the victim (Liberty National Life v. Weldon, 267 Ala.171 (1957)). Contract terms Special exclusions may apply, such as suicide clauses, whereby the policy becomes null and void if the insured commits suicide within a specified time (usually two years after the purchase date; some states provide a statutory one-year suicide clause). Any misrepresentations by the insured on the application may also be grounds for nullification. Most US states specify a maximum contestability period, often no more than two years. Only if the insured dies within this period will the insurer have a legal right to contest the claim on the basis of misrepresentation and request additional information before deciding whether to pay or deny the claim. The face amount of the policy is the initial amount that the policy will pay at the death of the insured or when the policy matures, although the actual death benefit can provide for greater or lesser than the face amount. The policy matures when the insured dies or reaches a specified age (such as 100 years old). Costs, insurability, and underwriting The insurance company calculates the policy prices (premiums) at a level sufficient to fund claims, cover administrative costs, and provide a profit. The cost of insurance is determined using mortality tables calculated by actuaries. Mortality tables are statistically based tables showing expected annual mortality rates of people at different ages. Put simply, people are more likely to die as they get older and the mortality tables enable the insurance companies to calculate the risk and increase premiums with age accordingly. Such estimates can be important in taxation regulation.[8][9] In the 1980s and 1990s, the SOA 1975–80 Basic Select & Ultimate tables were the typical reference points, while the 2001 VBT and 2001 CSO tables were published more recently. As well as the basic parameters of age and gender, the newer tables include separate mortality tables for smokers and non-smokers, and the CSO tables include separate tables for preferred classes.[10] The mortality tables provide a baseline for the cost of insurance, but the health and family history of the individual applicant is also taken into account (except in the case of Group policies). This investigation and resulting evaluation is termed underwriting. Health and lifestyle questions are asked, with certain responses possibly meriting further investigation. Specific factors that may be considered by underwriters include: Personal medical history[11] Family medical history[12] Driving record[13] Height and weight matrix, otherwise known as BMI (Body Mass Index)[14] Based on the above and additional factors, applicants will be placed into one of several classes of health ratings which will determine the premium paid in exchange for insurance at that particular carrier.[13] Life insurance companies in the United States support the Medical Information Bureau (MIB),[15] which is a clearing house of information on persons who have applied for life insurance with participating companies in the last seven years. As part of the application, the insurer often requires the applicant's permission to obtain information from their physicians.[16] Automated Life Underwriting is a technology solution which is designed to perform all or some of the screening functions traditionally completed by underwriters, and thus seeks to reduce the work effort, time and/or data necessary to underwrite a life insurance application.[17] These systems allow point of sale distribution and can shorten the time frame for issuance from weeks or even months to hours or minutes, depending on the amount of insurance being purchased.[18] The mortality of underwritten persons rises much more quickly than the general population. At the end of 10 years, the mortality of that 25-year-old, non-smoking male is 0.66/1000/year. Consequently, in a group of one thousand 25-year-old males with a $100,000 policy, all of average health, a life insurance company would have to collect approximately $50 a year from each participant to cover the relatively few expected claims. (0.35 to 0.66 expected deaths in each year × $100,000 payout per death = $35 per policy.) Other costs, such as administrative and sales expenses, also need to be considered when setting the premiums. A 10-year policy for a 25-year-old non-smoking male with preferred medical history may get offers as low as $90 per year for a $100,000 policy in the competitive US life insurance market. Most of the revenue received by insurance companies consists of premiums, but revenue from investing the premiums forms an important source of profit for most life insurance companies. Group Insurance policies are an exception to this. In the United States, life insurance companies are never legally required to provide coverage to everyone, with the exception of Civil Rights Act compliance requirements. Insurance companies alone determine insurability, and some people are deemed uninsurable. The policy can be declined or rated (increasing the premium amount to compensate for the higher risk), and the amount of the premium will be proportional to the face value of the policy. Many companies separate applicants into four general categories. These categories are preferred best, preferred, standard, and tobacco. Preferred best is reserved only for the healthiest individuals in the general population. This may mean, that the proposed insured has no adverse medical history, is not under medication, and has no family history of early-onset cancer, diabetes, or other conditions.[19] Preferred means that the proposed insured is currently under medication and has a family history of particular illnesses. Most people are in the standard category. People in the tobacco category typically have to pay higher premiums due to the higher mortality. Recent US mortality tables predict that roughly 0.35 in 1,000 non-smoking males aged 25 will die during the first year of a policy.[20] Mortality approximately doubles for every extra ten years of age, so the mortality rate in the first year for non-smoking men is about 2.5 in 1,000 people at age 65.[20] Compare this with the US population male mortality rates of 1.3 per 1,000 at age 25 and 19.3 at age 65 (without regard to health or smoking status).[21] Death proceeds Upon the insured's death, the insurer requires acceptable proof of death before it pays the claim. The normal minimum proof required is a death certificate, and the insurer's claim form completed, signed, and typically notarized.[citation needed] If the insured's death is suspicious and the policy amount is large, the insurer may investigate the circumstances surrounding the death before deciding whether it has an obligation to pay the claim. Payment from the policy may be as a lump sum or as an annuity, which is paid in regular installments for either a specified period or for the beneficiary's lifetime.[22] Insurance vs assurance The specific uses of the terms "insurance" and "assurance" are sometimes confused. In general, in jurisdictions where both terms are used, "insurance" refers to providing coverage for an event that might happen (fire, theft, flood, etc.), while "assurance" is the provision of coverage for an event that is certain to happen. In the United States, both forms of coverage are called "insurance" for reasons of simplicity in companies selling both products.[citation needed] By some definitions, "insurance" is any coverage that determines benefits based on actual losses whereas "assurance" is coverage with predetermined benefits irrespective of the losses incurred. Life insurance may be divided into two basic classes: temporary and permanent; or the following subclasses: term, universal, whole life, and endowment life insurance. Term insurance Main article: Term life insurance Term assurance provides life insurance coverage for a specified term. The policy does not accumulate cash value. Term insurance is significantly less expensive than an equivalent permanent policy but will become higher with age. Policy holders can save to provide for increased term premiums or decrease insurance needs (by paying off debts or saving to provide for survivor needs).[23] Mortgage life insurance insures a loan secured by real property and usually features a level premium amount for a declining policy face value because what is insured is the principal and interest outstanding on a mortgage that is constantly being reduced by mortgage payments. The face amount of the policy is always the amount of the principal and interest outstanding that are paid should the applicant die before the final installment is paid. Group life insurance Group life insurance (also known as wholesale life insurance or institutional life insurance) is term insurance covering a group of people, usually employees of a company, members of a union or association, or members of a pension or superannuation fund. Individual proof of insurability is not normally a consideration in its underwriting. Rather, the underwriter considers the size, turnover, and financial strength of the group. Contract provisions will attempt to exclude the possibility of adverse selection. Group life insurance often allows members exiting the group to maintain their coverage by buying individual coverage. The underwriting is carried out for the whole group instead of individuals. Permanent life insurance Permanent life insurance is life insurance that covers the remaining lifetime of the insured. A permanent insurance policy accumulates a cash value up to its date of maturation. The owner can access the money in the cash value by withdrawing money, borrowing the cash value, or surrendering the policy and receiving the surrender value. The three basic types of permanent insurance are whole life, universal life, and endowment. Whole life Main article: Whole life insurance Whole life insurance provides lifetime coverage for a set premium amount (see main article for a full explanation of the many variations and options). Universal life coverage Universal life insurance (ULl) is a relatively new insurance product, intended to combine permanent insurance coverage with greater flexibility in premium payments, along with the potential for greater growth of cash values. There are several types of universal life insurance policies, including interest-sensitive (also known as "traditional fixed universal life insurance"), variable universal life (VUL), guaranteed death benefit, and has equity-indexed universal life insurance. Universal life insurance policies have cash values. Paid-in premiums increase their cash values; administrative and other costs reduce their cash values. Universal life insurance addresses the perceived disadvantages of whole life—namely that premiums and death benefits are fixed. With universal life, both the premiums and death benefit are flexible. With the exception of guaranteed-death-benefit universal life policies, universal life policies trade their greater flexibility off for fewer guarantees. "Flexible death benefit" means the policy owner can choose to decrease the death benefit. The death benefit can also be increased by the policy owner, usually requiring new underwriting. Another feature of flexible death benefit is the ability to choose option A or option B death benefits and to change those options over the course of the life of the insured. Option A is often referred to as a "level death benefit"; death benefits remain level for the life of the insured, and premiums are lower than policies with Option B death benefits, which pay the policy's cash value—i.e., a face amount plus earnings/interest. If the cash value grows over time, the death benefits do too. If the cash value declines, the death benefit also declines. Option B policies normally feature higher premiums than option A policies. Endowments Main article: Endowment policy The endowment policy is a life insurance contract designed to pay a lump sum after a specific term (on its 'maturity') or on death. Typical maturities are ten, fifteen or twenty years up to a certain age limit. Some policies also pay out in the case of critical illness. Policies are typically traditional with-profits or unit-linked (including those with unitized with-profits funds). Endowments can be cashed in early (or surrendered) and the holder then receives the surrender value which is determined by the insurance company depending on how long the policy has been running and how much has been paid into it. Accidental death Accidental death insurance is a type of limited life insurance that is designed to cover the insured should they die as the result of an accident. "Accidents" run the gamut from abrasions to catastrophes but normally do not include deaths resulting from non-accident-related health problems or suicide. Because they only cover accidents, these policies are much less expensive than other life insurance policies. Such insurance can also be accidental death and dismemberment insurance or AD&D. In an AD&D policy, benefits are available not only for accidental death but also for the loss of limbs or body functions such as sight and hearing. Accidental death and AD&D policies very rarely pay a benefit, either because the cause of death is not covered by the policy or because death occurs well after the accident, by which time the premiums have gone unpaid. To know what coverage they have, insureds should always review their policies. Risky activities such as parachuting, flying, professional sports, or military service are often omitted from coverage. Accidental death insurance can also supplement standard life insurance as a rider. If a rider is purchased, the policy generally pays double the face amount if the insured dies from an accident. This was once called double indemnity insurance. In some cases, triple indemnity coverage may be available. Senior and pre-need products Insurance companies have in recent years developed products for niche markets, most notably targeting seniors in an aging population. These are often low to moderate face value whole life insurance policies, allowing senior citizens to purchase affordable insurance later in life. This may also be marketed as final expense insurance and usually have death benefits between $2,000 and $40,000. One reason for their popularity is that they only require answers to simple "yes" or "no" questions, while most policies require a medical exam to qualify. As with other policy types, the range of premiums can vary widely and should be scrutinized prior to purchase, as should the reliability of the companies. Health questions can vary substantially between exam and no-exam policies. It may be possible for individuals with certain conditions to qualify for one type of coverage and not another.[citation needed] Because seniors sometimes are not fully aware of the policy provisions it is important to make sure that policies last for a lifetime and that premiums do not increase every 5 years as is common in some circumstances.[citation needed] Pre-need life insurance policies are limited premium payment, whole life policies that are usually purchased by older applicants, though they are available to everyone. This type of insurance is designed to cover specific funeral expenses that the applicant has designated in a contract with a funeral home. The policy's death benefit is initially based on the funeral cost at the time of prearrangement, and it then typically grows as interest is credited. In exchange for the policy owner's designation, the funeral home typically guarantees that the proceeds will cover the cost of the funeral, no matter when death occurs. Excess proceeds may go either to the insured's estate, a designated beneficiary, or the funeral home as set forth in the contract. Purchasers of these policies usually make a single premium payment at the time of prearrangement, but some companies also allow premiums to be paid over as much as ten years. A LEADER IN ATTORNEY, COPY & MESSENGER SERVICES For over two decades, Advanced Attorney Services, Inc. has been a leading Attorney, Copy and Messenger services provider in Southern California. With a wide range of business solutions offered, Advanced is committed to superior service standards by providing our clients with new and innovative methods of operating to ensure the highest quality of services available at competitive rates. If your firm is in need of immediate or same day court service, process service, deposition services, writ services, fax filings, E-Filings, messenger, on or off-site copy services, as well as a wide range of other services, allow Advanced Attorney Services to get the job done right.A lawyer referral service maintains a network of lawyers, and connects people in need of lawyers with its participating attorneys. A potential client who contacts a lawyer referral service is directed to a lawyer who practices in the area of law that is most appropriate for their situation. Some lawyer referral services charge a fee for providing a referral, while others provide referrals at no cost to the prospective client. Many referral services connect prospective clients with lawyers who have agreed to provide a low-cost or free initial consultation.[1] Referral services are often provided by state and local bar associations as a public service. Referral services may also be offered by non-profit organizations and advocacy groups. For-profit referral services[1] may connect lawyers with clients who pay a membership fee, or a fee for successfully referred clients, subject to rules against sharing fees with non-lawyers.[2] Historically, lawyer referral services involved prospective clients contacting a bar association or responding to an advertisement, by placing a telephone call to the service and seeking a referral. [3] With the internet boom in the 1990s, many consumers turned to the web to search for goods and services.[4] A research study released in 2012, shows that 76 percent of adult consumers looking for a lawyer used online resources at some point during the search process.[5]Some referral services provide referrals to lawyers in a broad range of areas of legal practice. Others may focus on referrals within a narrow range of practice areas, or a single practice area.[6] Online lawyer referral services are sometimes called attorney-client matching services. People who contact a service may be matched with one or more attorneys, based upon such factors as area of legal practice and geographic location. Lawyers who participate in these services may pay a fee for participation, a fee for each referral, or in some cases a percentage of the amount charged to a referred client.[7] In some cases the prospective client will be able to choose from a list of referred attorneys, while in other cases the referral will be made to a specific participating lawyer.[8] If a client is unable to afford a lawyer and the legal problem is not a matter that can be handled by a lawyer on a percentage fee basis, some referral services may attempt to match the client with a pro bono lawyer, or direct the client to contact a legal aid organization or law student clinic for help.[9] Ethical issues may arise for lawyers who participate in for-profit referral services, and state rules governing participation can vary significantly.[10][11][12] Some referral services are certified by bar associations,[13] including the American Bar Association.[14] Certified referral services must maintain standards of service as defined by the certifying organization. Among those standards, certification may require that participating lawyers meet minimum standards of experience, or maintain legal malpractice insurance. The American Bar Association provides a list attorney referral services that meet its certification requirements.[15] Some legal associations have expressed concern that lawyer referral services can lead to lawyers trying to undercut each other to get clients, rather than focusing on quality of service and the development of their reputation among their peers.[16] Another concern about lawyer referral services relates to client confidentiality. When a prospective client contacts a lawyer directly about retaining the lawyer's services, the communication is normally held absolutely confidential under principles of attorney-client privilege. Where a lawyer referral service collects information from a person who is seeking a lawyer, that information will not normally be confidential, raising the possibility that information provided to the referral service will be discoverable by the opposing party in any subsequent litigation.[17] Lawyer referral services may have minimal requirements for participation, and in some cases may not do any verification of a lawyer's qualification or credentials. As a consequence, it remains necessary for a person who uses a referral service to investigate a lawyer's qualification before retaining the lawyer.[7] Some controversy also arises from whether professional referral services are anti-competitive in nature.[citation needed] For instance, since Board Certified attorneys often charge a higher hourly rate than other competent general practitioners, if a Lawyer Referral Service requires Board Certification for certain types of referrals, instead of merely providing the public a choice between a Board Certified attorney and a competent attorney who is not Board Certified, the effect may be to restrict competition and restrict public choice and push up consumer prices.[citation needed] State bars, which license attorneys, may be complicit in restricting client choice.[citation needed] 5 Types of Insurance You Need, and 4 Types of Policies You Don’t Posted by Miranda Marquit Last updated on May 24, 2019 | Insurance Advertiser Disclosure: Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any other entity. This site may be compensated through the advertiser Affiliate Program. [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Insurance is an interesting industry. It is there to protect you, but it sometimes seems like a huge waste of resources if you don’t end up needing it. Of course, if you do end up with a serious problem, not having insurance could take an already difficult situation and turn it into a financial catastrophe. While you don’t need to insure against everything, there are a few insurance policies that you should have. The key is to recognize which insurance policies are the most essential to protect yourself and find a way to incorporate them into your budget. Not doing so is a gamble which can have a devastating financial impact if something happens. Table of Contents 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need 1. Auto Insurance 2. Life Insurance 3. Home/Rental Insurance 4. Health Insurance 5. Disability Insurance 6. Travel Insurance 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need 1. Life Insurance for Children 2. Mortgage Life Insurance 3. Credit Card Insurance 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need These are the types of insurance you need to insure against the largest threats to your budget in the event of an unexpected disaster: 1. Auto Insurance If you have a car, you need auto insurance – and not only because every state law requires that you carry it. For many people, their car is their only way to get to work; if it becomes un-drivable due to an accident, and the money isn’t available to buy a new one, it can be hard to earn a living. Additionally, if you are at fault in an accident, the liability you have could become very expensive. Your auto insurance policy may pay medical bills and property damage so that you wouldn’t be forced to come up with the money out of pocket, possibly resulting in financial ruin. The good news is auto insurance is a competitive industry. You can easily compare rates with different car insurance companies to find the best deal in your area. 2. Life Insurance Life insurance is probably the most important insurance policy you will ever purchase. It protects your loved ones by providing income for them in the event you pass on. It can also be a good idea to insure your life, even if you aren’t the primary breadwinner. After all, the duties of a stay-at-home spouse are worth quite a bit. Though you may not pay a stay-at-home spouse a salary, it would be expensive to replace everything they do to run the household. Consider your needs, and make sure that you have adequate life insurance. There are also other forms of life insurance such as Mortgage Life Insurance, check out our post on the pros and cons for your reference! 3. Home/Rental Insurance Your home represents a huge, expensive asset. If it’s damaged, it’ll cost you, big time. And depending on how bad the damage is, you might not be able to live there while repairs are being made. Depending on your policy, homeowners insurance can help you pay for home repairs, short-term lodging, or even a new home . . . without a huge outlay of capital all at once. Rental insurance is also a good idea, since the landlord’s property insurance usually only covers the structure and land, but not the contents of the rental property. Thankfully, rental insurance is usually very affordable, sometimes as low as $10 a month. At that price, you can’t afford to skip it. With whichever option you need you can get instant online quotes through Lemonade. They are changing the homeowners/renters insurance market with low instant rates. Get homeowners/renters insurance rates with Lemonade>> 4. Health Insurance If you are uninsured, you may be one hospital stay away from bankruptcy. Health insurance will help you offset some of the rising costs of health care – at least when it comes to large health needs. If you have a chronic condition, health insurance can help you better afford the care you need. Even if you are in good health, and rarely use health care services, it can be a good idea to at least have a policy that covers major medical problems, just in case an accident befalls you. Get Health Insurance Rates >> 5. Disability Insurance Statistics show that 1 in 4 people will become disabled at some point before they retire. Even though this statistic includes people who receive short term disability, it is an astounding number. This makes us ask the question, “Can I afford a short term or long term disability?” Is your emergency fund large enough to sustain no income for a month? What about two months, or three months, or six months? The average monthly benefit paid by Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is $1,065 per month. Will that be enough to support your family? Disability insurance can help cover the unknown situations, and it can be a good idea, especially if you are the primary breadwinner in your household or work in a high-risk industry. Should you have an injury that qualifies for your policy, your disability insurance will pay you while you are unable to work. Disability insurance policies often vary substantially between providers, so be sure to thoroughly review your policy to understand which situations qualify for benefits, how and when you qualify for payments, how much you will receive, etc. Typically, there is a waiting period of up to 30 days or longer before disability benefits kick in, so it is always good to have an emergency fund in place so you can have something to live on in the meantime. 6. Travel Insurance Yes, you may want to consider travel insurance, especially in certain situations. For example, let’s say you plan the trip of your lifetime, and you go all out, virtually without regard to your budget (which is extreme, I know). You may not want to have to worry about spending tens of thousands of dollars and have something come up with ruins the whole deal. For a small fee, you can hedge your bets here. Of course, if you’re planning a little weekend trip and making your travel by car, you might want to pass up any extra costs. 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need In one of my favorite episodes of the television show Family Guy, a slick door-to-door salesman convinces the bumbling Peter to purchase volcano insurance. When Peter first suggests that they’d never had volcano trouble in Rhode Island, the salesman responds “Don’t you think we’re due for one?” which of course ensures his sale. Even though it would take effort to be as naïve as Peter, there are definitely times when it’s difficult to know if the insurance you are considering is worth your money, or if it’s just another example of volcano insurance. Here are four insurance policies that you can feel comfortable skipping: 1. Life Insurance for Children The traditional purpose of life insurance is to financially provide for your family in the case of premature death. Since your children are not contributing financially to the family, and will most likely grow up to be safe and healthy, paying into premiums for their life insurance does not make sense. The money you would spend on premiums would be better spent in an emergency fund, a 529 plan for their education, or in an IRA. Exceptions: There are times when a life insurance policy for makes sense for children. This includes when your child earns an income and contributes to the family, or when you can get a very inexpensive rider on your life insurance policy. Otherwise, you may be better off skipping the life insurance policy for your children. 2. Mortgage Life Insurance On the surface, this seems like a reasonable policy. This insurance will pay off your mortgage in the event of your death, giving your family one less financial headache during a stressful time. However, a good life insurance policy should provide your heirs with enough money to handle the mortgage and any other bills that they will have to pay. There’s no need to purchase a separate policy for this—just make sure that your life insurance is adequate to cover your family’s needs. (caveat: mortgage life insurance can be a good idea if you have preexisting conditions and are ineligible for a term life insurance policy; otherwise, term is the way to go). 3. Credit Card Insurance For those who carry a balance on their credit card, having a policy that will pay your credit card bill in the event that you are unable to do so seems like a smart plan. The benefits of these plans are relatively limited, however, meaning you’re paying a monthly premium only to have your benefits capped and still be in debt. It makes much more sense to send the amount of the premium toward your bill and try to get your credit card paid off. You’ll save money on interest in addition to avoiding having to pay another bill. 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance The sad fact of the matter is that many medical insurance policies have holes in their coverage. Because of that, specific disease insurance policies—and specifically cancer insurance—have become popular over the past few years to take care of the gaps in regular medical coverage. The problem with these types of insurance is that they are so specific, and they do not necessarily cover everything related to the disease. For example, many cancer insurance policies do not cover skin cancers, which are the most common form of the disease. A better use of your money would be to upgrade your current health insurance. That way you’re covered no matter what happens. When it comes to insurance, always make sure you take the time to do some research into what you need and what will be covered before you sign on the dotted line. And beware volcano insurance salesmen! [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Are there other types of insurance people need (or should at least consider)? Leave a comment with your thoughts! Supply and Variable Charges No matter which tariff structure you select, your bill is usually divided into supply and variable charges. The supply charge is unaffected by your energy consumption. It is listed on your bill as a “supply charge” or “service charge,” and refers to a daily charge you receive regardless of how much energy you use. The supply charge is the charge you receive for being connected to the energy grid. Some suppliers offer discounts on the supply charge, which benefits households that don’t use very much energy. The second charge on your bill is a variable charge. Most of the time this appears as a “usage charge” on your bill. For electricity, suppliers charge based on cents per kilowatt hour (kWh). Most suppliers offer discounts on usage charges, which are usually the largest portion of your bill. Peak and Controlled Load Usage Peak and controlled load peak usage hours are two of the terms you’ll see a lot when looking at electricity consumption. They may appear on your bill whether or not your plan even includes peak and controlled load hours for billing purposes. Not all plans use peak and controlled load rates. Most suppliers allow you to select a single-rate tariff or a time of use tariff. The latter option takes peak usage into account. Single Rate Tariff A single rate tariff charges you the same amount for your energy consumption, regardless of the time of day you use the most energy. These plans are good for those who use the bulk of their electricity during peak hours. In contrast, a time of use plan charges higher rates during peak hours, so you’ll pay more for the energy you use during these times. Your electricity bill may still say ‘general usage’ even if you have a single rate tariff. In this case you’re not being charged more, it’s simply how the energy supplier categorises your energy use. Time of Use Tariff The time of use tariff divides the day into peak hours and controlled load hours. Peak hours vary depending on your supplier and your plan, but tend to be during times when more people are using electricity. For example, weekday afternoons and early evenings are likely to be peak times. Electricity usage is cheaper during controlled load hours and more expensive during peak times. Time of use plans tend to be better for those who use most of their energy in the morning or at night. If it’s feasible to do so, you could save money by waiting to use more electricity during controlled load hours. Block Pricing Your electricity supplier may charge you using block pricing. In this tariff type, your usage is broken into two or more blocks of kilowatt hours. Your supplier charges the first energy block at one rate. After you exceed the specified limit, you move into the second block and are charged a different rate. Some suppliers charge a lower rate for the first block and increase the rate for subsequent blocks, while other suppliers do the opposite. The majority of energy suppliers use two blocks for pricing, but some go as high as five. Block pricing can save you money if you can access a pricing model that suits your usage. Smaller households that don’t use much electricity may be able to stay within the first block and pay a lower rate. Larger households that use high amounts of electricity could benefit from block pricing that starts at a higher rate and decreases as usage goes up. A controlled load tariff is one of the more obscure tariffs you can find through electricity suppliers. It’s worth considering controlled load tariffs, because they could save you money. With a controlled load tariff, you are charged separately for the electricity used to power a specific appliance such as hot water or slab heating. The controlled load appliance runs on a separate circuit than the rest of your home, and may have its own meter. The supplier charges one rate for your normal electricity usage, and a different rate for the controlled load. The catch to controlled load tariffs is that the appliance can only be used during a specified time frame. In New South Wales and Queensland you can choose between controlled load one and controlled load 2: the first option is cheaper, but the second operates under a longer time frame. Controlled load tariffs are designed for appliances that don’t need to run continuously, which is why they work well for hot water systems. Can a Controlled Load Tariff Save You Money? Some suppliers, however, provide discounts with no strings attached. Weigh up these discounts carefully when making your decision. The amount of money you save will also depend on a few factors. Your location and the supplier’s rate will determine whether or not it’s worth separating one or two of your major appliances on a controlled load. To access a controlled load tariff, customers will typically need to make arrangements with their electricity provider. Mortgage rates are continuing their downward spiral. According to Freddie Mac, the average rate on a 30-year fixed-rate loan has dropped to just 3.82%—down from 4.54% last June and its lowest point in nearly two years. The dip presents a prime opportunity for buyers and existing homeowners alike. For those looking to get out of the rent race, it means the most affordable interest rates since September 2017. As Vishal Garg, CEO of digital mortgage lender Better.com, explains, “Now is the most opportune time to get a loan. If you’re renting, you’re simply paying your landlord’s mortgage.” For those who already own a home, the rate drop could mean serious financial savings over time. In fact, according to data and analytics firm Black Knight, nearly every mortgage loan originated in 2018 could see a rate drop via refinancing. In total, a whopping 6.8 million homeowners could now qualify for a refinance and save at least 75 basis points—or around $268 per month. Less than two months ago, just 2 million homeowners could see these kinds of savings. Still, it’s not all about the rate. Refinance-eligible homeowners also have a chance to leverage their home equity. As Garg says, it’s “a rare opportunity for Americans to improve their financial health.” “If you have any other type of debt—car loan, credit card, student loan—and you own a home, you can tap into the equity of your home to pay off these other higher-interest loans,” Garg said. But experts caution that Freddie Mac’s average rate is just that—an average. Rates vary greatly from lender to lender, and a borrower's credit, debts and other factors all play a role in mortgage rates as well. In order to get the best rate possible, Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist Sam Khafer says shopping around is key. “While the drop in mortgage rates is a good opportunity for consumers to save on their mortgage payment, our research indicates that there can be a wide dispersion among mortgage rate offers,” he said. Khater estimates the average buyer can save around $1,500 up front by getting just one additional mortgage quote. Over the life of a 30-year loan, shopping around can save buyers more than $44,000, according to LendingTree's most recent Mortgage Comparison Shopping Report. That is both an easy and complex question, so let's do easy first: As a rule, in the United States the terms lawyer and attorney are interchangeable. Now for the hard answer. It's hard because we have to go back a bit in history to understand the distinctions. The term "lawyer" was generally used to refer to any person who has studied and been trained in the law. The lawyers of the early U.S. nationhood are a good example. Someone like John Adams or Thomas Jefferson were not only leaders of the American Revolution but they also were lawyers. An interesting note on Adams's career is that he actually provided a learned, principled, and successful defense of the British soldiers accused of crimes arising from the Boston Massacre. His reason was the same that many criminal defense attorneys cite today for their own careers. Every person, no matter how they are seen by the general public, deserves a zealous and competent defense (something we now find in the Sixth Amendment of the Constitution). As education in the U.S. improved and law began to become its own discipline, the term "attorney at law" (also attorney-at-law) was created around 1768. For a short time there was an effort to distinguish the two terms. The lawyer was one who studied and graduated after studying law, however, they were not necessarily seen as someone who had passed the bar; therefore they did not "practice law" before a court. Even today we see that one can graduate from an American law school, thus becoming a lawyer, but not pass the bar exam. Without the passing score on the bar exam, one can't be admitted to practice law in the jurisdiction (state or federal). The attorney at law, which was later shortened to just attorney, was used in some instances to mean a professional who is qualified to give legal advice and to represent a party in court. Eventually, the early form of the law degree (which was considered a professional degree much like that for the ministry or medicine) evolved to a point that it would require a much higher level of education in order to be reasonably qualified. Today, the terms attorney and lawyer are used interchangeably, mostly because the need to distinguish the right to practice law became so well defined with the expansion of the individual jurisdictions judicial system and also because the qualifying degree today to sit for the bar exam is a professional doctorate degree; usually the Juris Doctorate or J.D. There are still those who graduate from law school but never sit for the bar exam. The law degree is an excellent degree which can be used in many areas of business and government work other than the practice of law. Thus, the concept that one is a lawyer by virtue of the law degree still exists, it is just not enforced as enthusiastically as in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Este antisocial que estuvo cumpliendo condena en la cárcel de la Victoria por varios meses, luego salió en libertad, retomó sus fechorías y violó a una señora cuyo testimonio se encuentra en el video abajo.


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one of the most useful postgraduate degrees an international student can earn is a Master of Business Administration (MBA). This degree opens many doors regarding your employment, or any business endeavors you wish to pursue. MBAs are available to students who have already earned a bachelor's degree. Whatever your reason for considering earning an MBA, you’re going to want to begin the process having answered some key questions: What is an MBA? Why earn an MBA? How can an MBA benefit your career? How do you begin? What is an MBA? The MBA degree is widely believed to be one of the most prestigious and sought-after degrees in the world. Students of MBA programs study the theory and application of business and management principles. This type of study equips students with knowledge that can be applied to a variety of real-world business industries and situations.​ Why earn an MBA? Students may ask, what is an MBA for? In today's fast-paced economy, the MBA is the most popular professional degree around the world. The program blends advanced skills in business and management with real-world experience to prepare graduates for starting or advancing in a management career in any field they choose. In many cases, an MBA degree is required for executive and senior management positions. There are some companies who will not even consider applicants unless they have an MBA degree. Business school professors say MBA programs help students develop the skills required to excel as business executives, such as the ability to quickly and accurately analyze large amounts of information and the ability to develop smart solutions to business problems. How can an MBA benefit your career? Some of the reasons and benefits include: Advancing your career - This can mean a number of different things. In a circumstance where you have worked with a company and earned an MBA later on in your employment with them, you can leverage your position into a more prominent role. The best way to do so would be to keep an eye for in-house promotions that you could see yourself advancing to and being prepared to apply for it with your new credentials. An MBA is highly esteemed in nearly any industry and will often fast track you to better opportunities. Developing your business savvy - Your MBA will help in growing your professional network. You will come across many opportunities to connect with other MBAs and companies seeking to work with an MBA graduate. Utilizing the skills you learn from having an MBA will be invaluable in helping you with job security. Your degree will often make you an indispensable team member. Leading in an emerging field - Often these days, knowing an industry versus knowing how to maneuver in that industry with expertise will be the quality employers will seek. Many people can be taught how to work in specific industries, but not everyone will have the capacity to lead in said industries. Equipped with your MBA, you will likely be a frontrunner in any leading role in a field that is still budding. Starting your own business - Becoming an entrepreneur might be one of the most popular reasons to earn an MBA. To excel as an entrepreneur, you’ll need to learn to communicate effectively and persuasively. For many people, these skills don’t come naturally, but now more than ever, business schools have come to realize how critical it is for their students to graduate with the personal skills required for effective leadership. Business school is also the safest place to test out your most creative, outrageous, and ambitious ideas without the pressure and fear of failure if that company or those ideas don't work. You'll have teachers and mentors guiding you along the way as you search for your big idea. How do you begin? You’ll want to begin by choosing a school. When searching for a college or university in the US to pursue an MBA, here are a few things to consider: A good place to start is program length. There are a few options on what to pursue and how when it comes to an MBA. Full-time MBA programs in the US typically take two years to complete, but many programs also have one-year, accelerated options. Part-time MBA programs allow the flexibility of attending evening and/or weekend classes to accommodate to life’s busy schedule. Accelerated MBA programs are another recent addition to the MBA in the US offerings. Targeted at students with a background in business education (or the ability to make up for lost time through self-study), accelerated MBA programs in the US can take anywhere from 12-18 months to complete. Because of their emphasis on speed they spend considerably less time reviewing introductory material and eliminate many opportunities for degree specialization. Your options are plentiful, but many people will consider rankings and student satisfaction when choosing a school. Schools throughout the US such as Auburn University in Alabama, American University in Washington, DC, Emory University in Georgia, or Purdue University in Indiana that are ranked in the top 100 schools for MBAs are good ones to consider. Once you find an MBA program you want to... Begin the application process. There are actually three stages to the admissions cycle: pre-application, application, and post-application. Some business schools also give prospective MBAs three different application deadlines by separating the admissions season into rounds. Being aware of when each round occurs lets prospective students know when to complete the GMAT, get letters of recommendation, and prepare all other material required for admissions. If you have the chance to interview for programs where there’s the option to do so, be sure to take advantage. Like most application processes your resume, recommendations, and a completed application are required. Beyond the standard, an MBA application will include essays, transcripts, and GMAT scores. The goal for applicants is to present a strong application across all the evaluation materials. The stronger each element of the application is the higher the chance of being admitted in an MBA program in the USA. Most American business schools-regardless of the major focus-will train you in the principles of general business management. These principles include a combination of accounting, economics, finance, marketing and statistics, among other topics. American universities also offer a wealth of specialized M.B.A. programs and classes to tailor your degree. Depending on your intended career goals, you'll find programs that offer a more focused approach, including business administration, finance, human resources, information technology, marketing, nonprofit administration, and more. THEORY IN PRACTICE At every level, the American higher education system is different. Foundational principles and theories must be taught, but they are only mastered through practice. MBA programs in the United States strongly reflect this teaching philosophy. You will examine real-world case studies and business scenarios in order to devise strategies, business plans, budgets, etc. These types of projects will prepare you for real-life business situations and to approach them with practical knowledge. “In logistics management class, we had case studies to discuss: Ford company, HP, Ralph Lauren, and so on. We assumed that we were managers and analyzed the problems and solutions. We applied strategies that we learned from the textbook to solve problems. This is a very good part,” explains Boonpa Ing-Anuraksakul, from Thailand, studying Logistics Management at Truckee Meadows Community College in Reno, Nevada. The majority of MBA programs will have an internship requirement. Internships are an excellent way to really explore your future career and apply your studies. The companies for which you intern are thriving businesses and you will be working in a fast-paced environment. They will have professional expectations of you. While internships provide you with a practical learning environment, they are a prime setting for networking. Networking is one of the most powerful tools for your career. While you are an intern, take advantage of the opportunity to meet and network with current professionals. They may help you get a job or be your future colleagues. “An internship is a requirement in my curriculum. I believe this is helpful because the college encourages students to apply the skills outside the classroom and develop experience in the real world before graduating,” says Heejoong Kim, from Korea, studying Management and Marketing at Loyola University New Orleans. An internship will not only give you valuable experience, you will find that having a reputable American company listed on your resume will be invaluable. “When I graduate with my MBA, I will be competing in a very global job market. Having experience interacting with people from different cultures I believe will give me an edge in the professional world,” stated Juri Adrianto, from Indonesia, an MBA student in Information Systems at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck, New Jersey. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Supply chain management is one of the fastest growing business specialties across the globe. The Sam M. Walton College of Business at the University of Arkansas has created a Supply chain management department where MBA students specialize in this popular career. In fact, the majority of international students in the Walton MBA choose to specialize in Supply Chain due to the quickly expanding global job market in the field and the international reputation of the faculty. MBA Supply Chain majors study subjects such as modeling, forecasting, transportation strategies and global logistics.The Walton College MBA program also allows them to customize the program with special workshops such as Negotiation Skills, Networking, RFID technologies and Advanced Access. The program also provides one-on-one personal coaching in resume writing, job interview skills, salary negotiations and how to create the best first impression. FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY A one-year accelerated MBA with a concentration in Global Business attracts students from around the world to Fairleigh Dickinson University, near New York City, because of its focus on managing a multinational workforce and expanding into global markets. Having met the highest standards, the program is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The MBA program features a curriculum that covers the models, theories, concepts and practices that successful organizations utilize to gain a competitive advantage within the framework of the global economy. Concepts are brought to reality for students, with structured corporate visits and a 10-day overseas business trip. LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS Loyola University New Orleans M.B.A. program prepares students to become leaders in both for-profit and not-for-profit organizations in the increasingly global marketplace. The program is extremely flexible with student's schedules, allowing them to attend either full-time or part-time. Students are given advanced training in courses, such as: Leadership Dynamics, Ethical and Legal Responsibility, Advanced Financial Management, Global Supply Chain Management, Management Control and Decision-Making and Total Global Strategy. Partnerships with local businesses allow M.B.A. students to apply their studies outside of the classroom. Recently, the Entrepreneurial Consulting class partnered with the South Coast Angel Fund. Students' research and due diligence produced a $500K investment in a Social Media startup company. It’s time to take the next step in your professional life. Either your work experience, bachelor’s degree or career interests have all gathered together to show you what your next step in life is: your MBA. Doing a Master’s in Business Administration is a great way to direct your career into success, knowing that in most jobs having the MBA degree gets you ahead of the game. Today, there are more than 450 universities in the United States that offer MBA programs, and EduBookings can help you get admitted into hundreds of them and help you choose the top MBA colleges in America. Dozens of concentrations are also offered in many of the Business Schools, opening a world of opportunities to students. EduBookings works with over 120 universities in the United States, offering competitive and highly ranked MBA programs. Getting ready to apply for an MBA in the USA can be a little overwhelming. But that’s why international student’s agencies like EduBookings are here to help. We can make the entire process easier, better and get your acceptance letter faster, as oppose as doing it by yourself. Getting your documents ready, researching for minimum requirements, finding the right program for you, learning which standardized tests you need to take, and many more steps shouldn’t scare you and prevent you from doing your MBA in the USA. Understanding there is a lot to have in mind, we have prepared a list of things to take into consideration when studying abroad in the U.S and getting ready to apply for your MBA. Check the minimum requirements. Find out if you need to take the GMAT test, what is the minimum GPA required from your bachelor’s degree and if work experience is a requirement for admission. Make sure you meet the minimum criteria, as the MBA process is very competitive and if you don’t meet the criteria don’t get discouraged. EduBookings can help you waive some of the requirements or find the right university for you. Align your finances with your MBA plans and get your expectations right. Learn the cost of tuition, cost of living and calculate if it falls within your budget. Find out if there are employment options. While doing your MBA in the USA, most universities offer employment options to international students, such as teacher assistantships and mentor programs. This could be a relief to your finances and also a great way of practicing what you are learning. Learn how many international students are enrolled in your potential university. Intercultural socialization has been proven to help build a successful academic program. Dealing with different cultures and nationalities is a great way to open your mind to new experiences. Find out if the business school of your desired university is accredited. You want to make sure you will get the best value of your money when choosing a university to do your MBA in the USA. Having a national or international accreditation guarantees that the university is reputable and its Business program, well recognized. Check if you need a credential evaluation. Most universities need help understanding your degree from your country, course by course. For this reason, organizations such as WES offer a credential evaluation of your studies, an admission requirement for most MBA programs. The cost of this evaluation value between $200 and $300, approximately. Prepare a good resume. Showing work experience plays a key role in the admission departments of the universities. In some cases, 3 or more years of work experience can help you wave minimum requirements such as the GMAT or the minimum GPA. Choosing a concentration when planning your MBA in the U.S is quite important. Specializing your master’s can help you shape your career and paint a sharper panorama of your future as a working business professional. Here are some of the most popular MBA concentrations in the USA: ACCOUNTING FINANCE MARKETING REAL STATE DEVELOPMENT BUSINESS ANALYTICS INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS ENTREPRENEURSHIP HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OPERATION MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNET MARKETING NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT HEALTH SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP PUBLIC MANAGEMENT TAXATION LOOKING FOR AN EASY WAY TO FIND YOUR MBA CONCENTRATION? Finding the right concentration for your MBA in the United States can be difficult, which is why EduBookings.com has created this online search tool for international students looking to begin the MBA abroad. Take a second to look at the video below and learn for yourself how easy it can be to find the right university that fits your needs, using the tool below: When studying abroad, meeting people from all over the world is a crucial aspect of your education. Understanding the intricacies of all the cultures and nationalities can be a great opportunity for you to open your mind and learn from others. Also, knowing that the university is welcoming to international students, and diversity is integrated into their business programs is definitely key. Here are some of the Business Schools with most international students, according to the U.S News & World Report: Syracuse University with 73.1% of international students enrolled in The Martin J. Whitman School of Management. The University of Connecticut with 64.5% of international students. Pace University with 52.1% of international students enrolled in the Lubin School of Business The University of Tampa with 51.7% of international students enrolled in the John H. Sykes College of Business. The University of San Diego with 50.6% of international students. As a student or young professional, you may consider pursuing a Master of Business Administration. An MBA is a popular way to build business and management skills, while also advancing in your career. You gain many invaluable skills, build a strong network, open your career path and learn to think about industry trends and issues differently. An MBA helps set you up for success in the competitive business industry and offers you credibility. But before you decide to make the investment, here’s an outline of what you need to know about an MBA program. What is an MBA? A Master of Business Administration degree, also known as an MBA, is an internationally recognized degree with a focus on refining skills needed in business and management careers. An MBA provides students with practical experience needed to succeed in such roles. The program first began at Harvard University in the United States, and has grown into one of the most popular professional degree programs internationally. It’s most commonly offered in English and takes two years to complete as a full-time student, however it’s possible to enroll in a single-year MBA program. You may also complete an MBA as a part-time student if you’re unable to commit your time entirely. Individuals who have previous managerial experience in the industry may apply for the executive MBA program (EMBA). What are the admission requirements? Below you’ll find a list of the general requirements for an MBA program, however each school may differ. To learn specific details, please contact your host school or explore their website. Note: if you meet the minimum admission requirements, this does not guarantee you a secure spot in the program. An undergraduate degree from a recognized institution with a B average in the final two years of studies Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Minimum two years relevant work experience English language proficiency score in IELTS or TOEFL (if studies weren’t completed in English) Completion of school’s online application which may include the following: essay(s), statement of interest, recent resume, two (or more) references, transcripts, GMAT or GRE scores What courses to expect When you choose to pursue an MBA, you are provided with a much better understanding of the world of business. Some of the programs you will be enrolled in include the following: Finance Accounting Business Ethics Economics Marketing Organizational Behaviour Entrepreneurship Business Law Business Communication Why get an MBA? Leadership skills Leadership skills Students who enroll in an MBA program are learning alongside bright, driven, high-strung personalities. When it comes to group projects, you will gain a lot of experience in leadership and conflict resolution. Working in a group setting naturally provides you with communication skills and the ability to motivate others as you all have one goal in common. In addition, completing an MBA provides you with credibility and shows other industry professionals you are an expert in the field, and are dedicated to the industry. Build a network Build a network of like minded people On top of being taught by some of the best mentors in the industry, you are constantly surrounded by like minded individuals who you can discuss industry trends and issues with. You both challenge and learn from each other, and connect on different topics, creating a type of community. This network could be incredibly useful to you whether you are on the hunt for a new job or are in need of someone to brainstorm ideas with when building a business. In addition to this, the school’s name will further connect you to other industry professionals. Career opportunities Career opportunities Many pursue an MBA to expand their career options, because with such a degree comes new skills you can apply in a number of fields. Having an MBA also provides you with higher chances of securing a managerial role, which in turn may present a higher salary. Some individuals pursue an MBA with the idea they will one day own their own company. Many leaders in the Fortune 500 companies have completed an MBA. This is not to say an MBA will guarantee a successful billion dollar company, however it opens many doors. Different perspective Think Globally Completing an MBA enhances your knowledge in the business and management industry, and allows you to think globally about big business issues. You learn to reflect much deeper and think from various angles when it comes to trends and issues in the industry. This in turn allows you to develop and apply smart solutions. It’s important to offer a fresh and unique perspective to potential future employers and employees. This specifically sets you apart from your competitors. So, you must now decide if an MBA is worth it. Will it help advance your career? Do the courses interest you? Are you in search of a business school in Canada or the USA? Register with ApplyBoard and find out which business schools are the best fit for you. Curious to know what the top business schools in Canada are? Read about it in our blog here! Adrianna Dyczkowsky, Public Relations Specialist at ApplyBoard Tags: Higher Education, International Education, Management, Masters, MBA, students, study abroad One Comment Know the facts: Western University Ivey Business School - ApplyBoard […] Here’s what you need to know about a Master’s in Business Administration […] What is a Master of Business Administration? A Masters of Business Administration (MBA) is a graduate level degree awarded to students with an advanced knowledge of business. MBA's cultivate skills in leadership with a focus on courses such as accounting, finance, economics, marketing and more. Start Your Master of Business Administration with No GMAT Required In any business-related career field, the MBA degree is highly sought after. The Master of Business Administration program at GCU enhances a broad range of marketable skills that can give job applicants an edge. Many working professionals want to get started on an MBA program online but lack the time to study for the GMAT. The Colangelo College of Business addresses this issue by inviting you to apply for the MBA program, with no GMAT required. Future business leaders and executives will focus on leadership development, operations management and organizational growth. GCU filters these content areas through the lens of ethical decision-making and critical thinking with a Christian worldview. GCU is a regionally accredited, private university. The core programs from the Colangelo College of Business are approved by the Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs. The Benefits of Having an MBA The online MBA with no GMAT required offers a path for deepening your understanding of the business knowledge, skills and processes that fuel success. In this MBA program, you will enhance these skills: Transformational leadership Effective communication Ethical decision-making Critical thinking and analysis Productive networking This master’s in business administration program is designed with a broad range of business fields in mind. As an MBA candidate, you will develop transferable skills that can apply to any industry. Master of Business Administration Courses and Topics GCU is a modern school that embraces a 21st century style of learning. With our online MBA program, you do not have to choose between your career and your education. Take courses online and take part in small group discussions in a diverse, online classroom. This degree requires a total of 46 credits. Most of the MBA online classes are eight weeks long. The core program courses include: Leadership and Organizations Accounting Practices Finance Principles Applied Business Probability and Statistics Marketing Management Managerial Accounting Operations Management You will also study quantitative tools and techniques, managerial finance, strategic management and economics. The coursework includes individual and group projects, case studies, theories and applications. Some of the core ideas you will examine include: Sustainability in the global marketplace Behaviors and techniques of efficient operations The use of economic data for smart decision-making Asset evaluation The program explores the management of working capital and the raising of funds in capital markets, as well as financial forecasting. Job Opportunities with an MBA The MBA is a respected degree that increases the capabilities and credibility of job applicants. You may decide to pursue your MBA shortly after graduating from a bachelor’s program. Or, you may apply when it becomes apparent that having an MBA may be a path toward pursuing a career as an executive or manager. Some examples of career paths that can stem from an MBA degree may include: Entrepreneur/founder Chief executive officer Vice president of operations Director of operations Business leaders are often expected to have an MBA. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, 79 percent of all employers surveyed expected to hire MBA graduates in 2017. A Master of Business Administration program can also open doors to future executives who are pursuing networking opportunities. According to the Graduate Management Admission Council, of all companies surveyed that implement internship programs, 66 percent planned to offer these opportunities to MBA students in 2017. The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree will dramatically expand one’s knowledge of business and is the academic ticket to greater opportunities for employment, promotions, and income. The M.B.A. encapsulates complex business analyses, the effect of current events on the global business environment, multicultural influences on business decision-making, and examining the functional areas of business in addressing management decisions. The program includes courses in accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and data analytics. An M.B.A. offers a well-rounded foundation for a career in the corporate world or the education arena. It is vital that the student who wishes to pursue the M.B.A. seek a university that has earned the AACSB accreditation—as has MTSU’s Jennings A. Jones College of Business, an acknowledgement that the program has passed rigorous standards that evaluate faculty qualifications, curricula, missions and objectives, and other aspects that have created a high-quality business regimen. Students pursuing the M.B.A. program also may choose from three concentrations in Healthcare Management, Music Business or Concrete Industry Management. The latter is open only to those individuals who have considerable experience in the concrete industry and related fields. The M.B.A. is also available in a flexible, 100% online format. Learn more about the online M.B.A. program. Full-time MBA programs normally take place over two academic years (i.e. approximately 18 months of term time). For example, in the Northern Hemisphere they often begin in late August or early September of year one and continue until May or June of year two, with a three to four month summer break in between years one and two. Students enter with a reasonable amount of prior real-world work experience and take classes during weekdays like other university students. A typical full-time, accelerated, part-time, or modular MBA requires 60 credits (600 class hours) of graduate work.[25] Accelerated MBA programs are a variation of the two-year programs. They involve a higher course load with more intense class and examination schedules and are usually condensed into one year. They usually have less down time during the program and between semesters. For example, there is no three to four-month summer break, and between semesters there might be seven to ten days off rather than three to five weeks vacation. Accelerated programs typically have a lower cost than full-time two-year programs. Part-time MBA programs normally hold classes on weekday evenings after normal working hours, or on weekends. Part-time programs normally last three years or more. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who take a light course load for a longer period of time until the graduation requirements are met. Evening (second shift) MBA programs are full-time programs that normally hold classes on weekday evenings, after normal working hours, or on weekends for a duration of two years. The students in these programs typically consist of working professionals, who can not leave their work to pursue a full-time regular shift MBA. Most second shift programs are offered at universities in India. Modular MBA programs are similar to part-time programs, although typically employing a lock-step curriculum with classes packaged together in blocks lasting from one to three weeks. Executive MBA (EMBA) programs developed to meet the educational needs of managers and executives, allowing students to earn an MBA (or another business-related graduate degree) in two years or less while working full-time. Participants come from every type and size of organization – profit, nonprofit, government – representing a variety of industries. EMBA students typically have a higher level of work experience, often 10 years or more, compared to other MBA students. In response to the increasing number of EMBA programs offered, The Executive MBA Council was formed in 1981 to advance executive education. Full-time executive MBA programs are a new category of full-time 1 year MBA programs aimed at professionals with approx. 5 years or more. They are primarily offered in countries like India where the 2-year MBA program is targeted at fresh graduates with no experience or minimal experience. These full-time executive MBA programs are similar to 1 year MBA programs offered by schools like Insead and IMD. Distance learning MBA programs hold classes off-campus. These programs can be offered in a number of different formats: correspondence courses by postal mail or email, non-interactive broadcast video, pre-recorded video, live teleconference or videoconference, offline or online computer courses. Many schools offer these programs. Blended learning programs combine distance learning with face-to-face instruction.[26] These programs typically target working professionals who are unable to attend traditional part-time programs.[27] MBA dual degree programs combine an MBA with others (such as an MS, MA, or a JD, etc.) to let students cut costs (dual programs usually cost less than pursuing 2 degrees separately), save time on education and to tailor the business education courses to their needs. This is generally achieved by allowing core courses of one program count as electives in the other. Some business schools offer programs in which students can earn both a bachelor's degree in business administration and an MBA in five years. Mini-MBA is a term used by many non-profit and for-profit institutions to describe a training regimen focused on the fundamentals of business. In the past, Mini-MBA programs have typically been offered as non-credit bearing courses that require less than 100 hours of total learning. However, due to the criticisms of these certificates, many schools have now shifted their programs to offer courses for full credit so that they may be applied towards a complete traditional MBA degree. This is to allow students to verify business related coursework for employment purposes and still allow the option to complete a full-time MBA degree program at a later period, if they elect to do so. Life insurance (or life assurance, especially in the Commonwealth of Nations) is a contract between an insurance policy holder and an insurer or assurer, where the insurer promises to pay a designated beneficiary a sum of money (the benefit) in exchange for a premium, upon the death of an insured person (often the policy holder). Depending on the contract, other events such as terminal illness or critical illness can also trigger payment. The policy holder typically pays a premium, either regularly or as one lump sum. Other expenses, such as funeral expenses, can also be included in the benefits. Life policies are legal contracts and the terms of the contract describe the limitations of the insured events. Specific exclusions are often written into the contract to limit the liability of the insurer; common examples are claims relating to suicide, fraud, war, riot, and civil commotion. Life-based contracts tend to fall into two major categories: Protection policies – designed to provide a benefit, typically a lump sum payment, in the event of a specified occurrence. A common form—more common in years past—of a protection policy design is term insurance. Investment policies – the main objective of these policies is to facilitate the growth of capital by regular or single premiums. Common forms (in the U.S.) are whole life, universal life, and variable life policies. Parties to contract The person responsible for making payments for a policy is the policy owner, while the insured is the person whose death will trigger payment of the death benefit. The owner and insured may or may not be the same person. For example, if Joe buys a policy on his own life, he is both the owner and the insured. But if Jane, his wife, buys a policy on Joe's life, she is the owner and he is the insured. The policy owner is the guarantor and he will be the person to pay for the policy. The insured is a participant in the contract, but not necessarily a party to it. Chart of a life insurance The beneficiary receives policy proceeds upon the insured person's death. The owner designates the beneficiary, but the beneficiary is not a party to the policy. The owner can change the beneficiary unless the policy has an irrevocable beneficiary designation. If a policy has an irrevocable beneficiary, any beneficiary changes, policy assignments, or cash value borrowing would require the agreement of the original beneficiary. In cases where the policy owner is not the insured (also referred to as the celui qui vit or CQV), insurance companies have sought to limit policy purchases to those with an insurable interest in the CQV. For life insurance policies, close family members and business partners will usually be found to have an insurable interest. The insurable interest requirement usually demonstrates that the purchaser will actually suffer some kind of loss if the CQV dies. Such a requirement prevents people from benefiting from the purchase of purely speculative policies on people they expect to die. With no insurable interest requirement, the risk that a purchaser would murder the CQV for insurance proceeds would be great. In at least one case, an insurance company which sold a policy to a purchaser with no insurable interest (who later murdered the CQV for the proceeds), was found liable in court for contributing to the wrongful death of the victim (Liberty National Life v. Weldon, 267 Ala.171 (1957)). Contract terms Special exclusions may apply, such as suicide clauses, whereby the policy becomes null and void if the insured commits suicide within a specified time (usually two years after the purchase date; some states provide a statutory one-year suicide clause). Any misrepresentations by the insured on the application may also be grounds for nullification. Most US states specify a maximum contestability period, often no more than two years. Only if the insured dies within this period will the insurer have a legal right to contest the claim on the basis of misrepresentation and request additional information before deciding whether to pay or deny the claim. The face amount of the policy is the initial amount that the policy will pay at the death of the insured or when the policy matures, although the actual death benefit can provide for greater or lesser than the face amount. The policy matures when the insured dies or reaches a specified age (such as 100 years old). Costs, insurability, and underwriting The insurance company calculates the policy prices (premiums) at a level sufficient to fund claims, cover administrative costs, and provide a profit. The cost of insurance is determined using mortality tables calculated by actuaries. Mortality tables are statistically based tables showing expected annual mortality rates of people at different ages. Put simply, people are more likely to die as they get older and the mortality tables enable the insurance companies to calculate the risk and increase premiums with age accordingly. Such estimates can be important in taxation regulation.[8][9] In the 1980s and 1990s, the SOA 1975–80 Basic Select & Ultimate tables were the typical reference points, while the 2001 VBT and 2001 CSO tables were published more recently. As well as the basic parameters of age and gender, the newer tables include separate mortality tables for smokers and non-smokers, and the CSO tables include separate tables for preferred classes.[10] The mortality tables provide a baseline for the cost of insurance, but the health and family history of the individual applicant is also taken into account (except in the case of Group policies). This investigation and resulting evaluation is termed underwriting. Health and lifestyle questions are asked, with certain responses possibly meriting further investigation. Specific factors that may be considered by underwriters include: Personal medical history[11] Family medical history[12] Driving record[13] Height and weight matrix, otherwise known as BMI (Body Mass Index)[14] Based on the above and additional factors, applicants will be placed into one of several classes of health ratings which will determine the premium paid in exchange for insurance at that particular carrier.[13] Life insurance companies in the United States support the Medical Information Bureau (MIB),[15] which is a clearing house of information on persons who have applied for life insurance with participating companies in the last seven years. As part of the application, the insurer often requires the applicant's permission to obtain information from their physicians.[16] Automated Life Underwriting is a technology solution which is designed to perform all or some of the screening functions traditionally completed by underwriters, and thus seeks to reduce the work effort, time and/or data necessary to underwrite a life insurance application.[17] These systems allow point of sale distribution and can shorten the time frame for issuance from weeks or even months to hours or minutes, depending on the amount of insurance being purchased.[18] The mortality of underwritten persons rises much more quickly than the general population. At the end of 10 years, the mortality of that 25-year-old, non-smoking male is 0.66/1000/year. Consequently, in a group of one thousand 25-year-old males with a $100,000 policy, all of average health, a life insurance company would have to collect approximately $50 a year from each participant to cover the relatively few expected claims. (0.35 to 0.66 expected deaths in each year × $100,000 payout per death = $35 per policy.) Other costs, such as administrative and sales expenses, also need to be considered when setting the premiums. A 10-year policy for a 25-year-old non-smoking male with preferred medical history may get offers as low as $90 per year for a $100,000 policy in the competitive US life insurance market. Most of the revenue received by insurance companies consists of premiums, but revenue from investing the premiums forms an important source of profit for most life insurance companies. Group Insurance policies are an exception to this. In the United States, life insurance companies are never legally required to provide coverage to everyone, with the exception of Civil Rights Act compliance requirements. Insurance companies alone determine insurability, and some people are deemed uninsurable. The policy can be declined or rated (increasing the premium amount to compensate for the higher risk), and the amount of the premium will be proportional to the face value of the policy. Many companies separate applicants into four general categories. These categories are preferred best, preferred, standard, and tobacco. Preferred best is reserved only for the healthiest individuals in the general population. This may mean, that the proposed insured has no adverse medical history, is not under medication, and has no family history of early-onset cancer, diabetes, or other conditions.[19] Preferred means that the proposed insured is currently under medication and has a family history of particular illnesses. Most people are in the standard category. People in the tobacco category typically have to pay higher premiums due to the higher mortality. Recent US mortality tables predict that roughly 0.35 in 1,000 non-smoking males aged 25 will die during the first year of a policy.[20] Mortality approximately doubles for every extra ten years of age, so the mortality rate in the first year for non-smoking men is about 2.5 in 1,000 people at age 65.[20] Compare this with the US population male mortality rates of 1.3 per 1,000 at age 25 and 19.3 at age 65 (without regard to health or smoking status).[21] Death proceeds Upon the insured's death, the insurer requires acceptable proof of death before it pays the claim. The normal minimum proof required is a death certificate, and the insurer's claim form completed, signed, and typically notarized.[citation needed] If the insured's death is suspicious and the policy amount is large, the insurer may investigate the circumstances surrounding the death before deciding whether it has an obligation to pay the claim. Payment from the policy may be as a lump sum or as an annuity, which is paid in regular installments for either a specified period or for the beneficiary's lifetime.[22] Insurance vs assurance The specific uses of the terms "insurance" and "assurance" are sometimes confused. In general, in jurisdictions where both terms are used, "insurance" refers to providing coverage for an event that might happen (fire, theft, flood, etc.), while "assurance" is the provision of coverage for an event that is certain to happen. In the United States, both forms of coverage are called "insurance" for reasons of simplicity in companies selling both products.[citation needed] By some definitions, "insurance" is any coverage that determines benefits based on actual losses whereas "assurance" is coverage with predetermined benefits irrespective of the losses incurred. Life insurance may be divided into two basic classes: temporary and permanent; or the following subclasses: term, universal, whole life, and endowment life insurance. Term insurance Main article: Term life insurance Term assurance provides life insurance coverage for a specified term. The policy does not accumulate cash value. Term insurance is significantly less expensive than an equivalent permanent policy but will become higher with age. Policy holders can save to provide for increased term premiums or decrease insurance needs (by paying off debts or saving to provide for survivor needs).[23] Mortgage life insurance insures a loan secured by real property and usually features a level premium amount for a declining policy face value because what is insured is the principal and interest outstanding on a mortgage that is constantly being reduced by mortgage payments. The face amount of the policy is always the amount of the principal and interest outstanding that are paid should the applicant die before the final installment is paid. Group life insurance Group life insurance (also known as wholesale life insurance or institutional life insurance) is term insurance covering a group of people, usually employees of a company, members of a union or association, or members of a pension or superannuation fund. Individual proof of insurability is not normally a consideration in its underwriting. Rather, the underwriter considers the size, turnover, and financial strength of the group. Contract provisions will attempt to exclude the possibility of adverse selection. Group life insurance often allows members exiting the group to maintain their coverage by buying individual coverage. The underwriting is carried out for the whole group instead of individuals. Permanent life insurance Permanent life insurance is life insurance that covers the remaining lifetime of the insured. A permanent insurance policy accumulates a cash value up to its date of maturation. The owner can access the money in the cash value by withdrawing money, borrowing the cash value, or surrendering the policy and receiving the surrender value. The three basic types of permanent insurance are whole life, universal life, and endowment. Whole life Main article: Whole life insurance Whole life insurance provides lifetime coverage for a set premium amount (see main article for a full explanation of the many variations and options). Universal life coverage Universal life insurance (ULl) is a relatively new insurance product, intended to combine permanent insurance coverage with greater flexibility in premium payments, along with the potential for greater growth of cash values. There are several types of universal life insurance policies, including interest-sensitive (also known as "traditional fixed universal life insurance"), variable universal life (VUL), guaranteed death benefit, and has equity-indexed universal life insurance. Universal life insurance policies have cash values. Paid-in premiums increase their cash values; administrative and other costs reduce their cash values. Universal life insurance addresses the perceived disadvantages of whole life—namely that premiums and death benefits are fixed. With universal life, both the premiums and death benefit are flexible. With the exception of guaranteed-death-benefit universal life policies, universal life policies trade their greater flexibility off for fewer guarantees. "Flexible death benefit" means the policy owner can choose to decrease the death benefit. The death benefit can also be increased by the policy owner, usually requiring new underwriting. Another feature of flexible death benefit is the ability to choose option A or option B death benefits and to change those options over the course of the life of the insured. Option A is often referred to as a "level death benefit"; death benefits remain level for the life of the insured, and premiums are lower than policies with Option B death benefits, which pay the policy's cash value—i.e., a face amount plus earnings/interest. If the cash value grows over time, the death benefits do too. If the cash value declines, the death benefit also declines. Option B policies normally feature higher premiums than option A policies. Endowments Main article: Endowment policy The endowment policy is a life insurance contract designed to pay a lump sum after a specific term (on its 'maturity') or on death. Typical maturities are ten, fifteen or twenty years up to a certain age limit. Some policies also pay out in the case of critical illness. Policies are typically traditional with-profits or unit-linked (including those with unitized with-profits funds). Endowments can be cashed in early (or surrendered) and the holder then receives the surrender value which is determined by the insurance company depending on how long the policy has been running and how much has been paid into it. Accidental death Accidental death insurance is a type of limited life insurance that is designed to cover the insured should they die as the result of an accident. "Accidents" run the gamut from abrasions to catastrophes but normally do not include deaths resulting from non-accident-related health problems or suicide. Because they only cover accidents, these policies are much less expensive than other life insurance policies. Such insurance can also be accidental death and dismemberment insurance or AD&D. In an AD&D policy, benefits are available not only for accidental death but also for the loss of limbs or body functions such as sight and hearing. Accidental death and AD&D policies very rarely pay a benefit, either because the cause of death is not covered by the policy or because death occurs well after the accident, by which time the premiums have gone unpaid. To know what coverage they have, insureds should always review their policies. Risky activities such as parachuting, flying, professional sports, or military service are often omitted from coverage. Accidental death insurance can also supplement standard life insurance as a rider. If a rider is purchased, the policy generally pays double the face amount if the insured dies from an accident. This was once called double indemnity insurance. In some cases, triple indemnity coverage may be available. Senior and pre-need products Insurance companies have in recent years developed products for niche markets, most notably targeting seniors in an aging population. These are often low to moderate face value whole life insurance policies, allowing senior citizens to purchase affordable insurance later in life. This may also be marketed as final expense insurance and usually have death benefits between $2,000 and $40,000. One reason for their popularity is that they only require answers to simple "yes" or "no" questions, while most policies require a medical exam to qualify. As with other policy types, the range of premiums can vary widely and should be scrutinized prior to purchase, as should the reliability of the companies. Health questions can vary substantially between exam and no-exam policies. It may be possible for individuals with certain conditions to qualify for one type of coverage and not another.[citation needed] Because seniors sometimes are not fully aware of the policy provisions it is important to make sure that policies last for a lifetime and that premiums do not increase every 5 years as is common in some circumstances.[citation needed] Pre-need life insurance policies are limited premium payment, whole life policies that are usually purchased by older applicants, though they are available to everyone. This type of insurance is designed to cover specific funeral expenses that the applicant has designated in a contract with a funeral home. The policy's death benefit is initially based on the funeral cost at the time of prearrangement, and it then typically grows as interest is credited. In exchange for the policy owner's designation, the funeral home typically guarantees that the proceeds will cover the cost of the funeral, no matter when death occurs. Excess proceeds may go either to the insured's estate, a designated beneficiary, or the funeral home as set forth in the contract. Purchasers of these policies usually make a single premium payment at the time of prearrangement, but some companies also allow premiums to be paid over as much as ten years. A LEADER IN ATTORNEY, COPY & MESSENGER SERVICES For over two decades, Advanced Attorney Services, Inc. has been a leading Attorney, Copy and Messenger services provider in Southern California. With a wide range of business solutions offered, Advanced is committed to superior service standards by providing our clients with new and innovative methods of operating to ensure the highest quality of services available at competitive rates. If your firm is in need of immediate or same day court service, process service, deposition services, writ services, fax filings, E-Filings, messenger, on or off-site copy services, as well as a wide range of other services, allow Advanced Attorney Services to get the job done right.A lawyer referral service maintains a network of lawyers, and connects people in need of lawyers with its participating attorneys. A potential client who contacts a lawyer referral service is directed to a lawyer who practices in the area of law that is most appropriate for their situation. Some lawyer referral services charge a fee for providing a referral, while others provide referrals at no cost to the prospective client. Many referral services connect prospective clients with lawyers who have agreed to provide a low-cost or free initial consultation.[1] Referral services are often provided by state and local bar associations as a public service. Referral services may also be offered by non-profit organizations and advocacy groups. For-profit referral services[1] may connect lawyers with clients who pay a membership fee, or a fee for successfully referred clients, subject to rules against sharing fees with non-lawyers.[2] Historically, lawyer referral services involved prospective clients contacting a bar association or responding to an advertisement, by placing a telephone call to the service and seeking a referral. [3] With the internet boom in the 1990s, many consumers turned to the web to search for goods and services.[4] A research study released in 2012, shows that 76 percent of adult consumers looking for a lawyer used online resources at some point during the search process.[5]Some referral services provide referrals to lawyers in a broad range of areas of legal practice. Others may focus on referrals within a narrow range of practice areas, or a single practice area.[6] Online lawyer referral services are sometimes called attorney-client matching services. People who contact a service may be matched with one or more attorneys, based upon such factors as area of legal practice and geographic location. Lawyers who participate in these services may pay a fee for participation, a fee for each referral, or in some cases a percentage of the amount charged to a referred client.[7] In some cases the prospective client will be able to choose from a list of referred attorneys, while in other cases the referral will be made to a specific participating lawyer.[8] If a client is unable to afford a lawyer and the legal problem is not a matter that can be handled by a lawyer on a percentage fee basis, some referral services may attempt to match the client with a pro bono lawyer, or direct the client to contact a legal aid organization or law student clinic for help.[9] Ethical issues may arise for lawyers who participate in for-profit referral services, and state rules governing participation can vary significantly.[10][11][12] Some referral services are certified by bar associations,[13] including the American Bar Association.[14] Certified referral services must maintain standards of service as defined by the certifying organization. Among those standards, certification may require that participating lawyers meet minimum standards of experience, or maintain legal malpractice insurance. The American Bar Association provides a list attorney referral services that meet its certification requirements.[15] Some legal associations have expressed concern that lawyer referral services can lead to lawyers trying to undercut each other to get clients, rather than focusing on quality of service and the development of their reputation among their peers.[16] Another concern about lawyer referral services relates to client confidentiality. When a prospective client contacts a lawyer directly about retaining the lawyer's services, the communication is normally held absolutely confidential under principles of attorney-client privilege. Where a lawyer referral service collects information from a person who is seeking a lawyer, that information will not normally be confidential, raising the possibility that information provided to the referral service will be discoverable by the opposing party in any subsequent litigation.[17] Lawyer referral services may have minimal requirements for participation, and in some cases may not do any verification of a lawyer's qualification or credentials. As a consequence, it remains necessary for a person who uses a referral service to investigate a lawyer's qualification before retaining the lawyer.[7] Some controversy also arises from whether professional referral services are anti-competitive in nature.[citation needed] For instance, since Board Certified attorneys often charge a higher hourly rate than other competent general practitioners, if a Lawyer Referral Service requires Board Certification for certain types of referrals, instead of merely providing the public a choice between a Board Certified attorney and a competent attorney who is not Board Certified, the effect may be to restrict competition and restrict public choice and push up consumer prices.[citation needed] State bars, which license attorneys, may be complicit in restricting client choice.[citation needed] 5 Types of Insurance You Need, and 4 Types of Policies You Don’t Posted by Miranda Marquit Last updated on May 24, 2019 | Insurance Advertiser Disclosure: Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any other entity. This site may be compensated through the advertiser Affiliate Program. [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Insurance is an interesting industry. It is there to protect you, but it sometimes seems like a huge waste of resources if you don’t end up needing it. Of course, if you do end up with a serious problem, not having insurance could take an already difficult situation and turn it into a financial catastrophe. While you don’t need to insure against everything, there are a few insurance policies that you should have. The key is to recognize which insurance policies are the most essential to protect yourself and find a way to incorporate them into your budget. Not doing so is a gamble which can have a devastating financial impact if something happens. Table of Contents 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need 1. Auto Insurance 2. Life Insurance 3. Home/Rental Insurance 4. Health Insurance 5. Disability Insurance 6. Travel Insurance 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need 1. Life Insurance for Children 2. Mortgage Life Insurance 3. Credit Card Insurance 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance 5 Types of Insurance Policies You Need These are the types of insurance you need to insure against the largest threats to your budget in the event of an unexpected disaster: 1. Auto Insurance If you have a car, you need auto insurance – and not only because every state law requires that you carry it. For many people, their car is their only way to get to work; if it becomes un-drivable due to an accident, and the money isn’t available to buy a new one, it can be hard to earn a living. Additionally, if you are at fault in an accident, the liability you have could become very expensive. Your auto insurance policy may pay medical bills and property damage so that you wouldn’t be forced to come up with the money out of pocket, possibly resulting in financial ruin. The good news is auto insurance is a competitive industry. You can easily compare rates with different car insurance companies to find the best deal in your area. 2. Life Insurance Life insurance is probably the most important insurance policy you will ever purchase. It protects your loved ones by providing income for them in the event you pass on. It can also be a good idea to insure your life, even if you aren’t the primary breadwinner. After all, the duties of a stay-at-home spouse are worth quite a bit. Though you may not pay a stay-at-home spouse a salary, it would be expensive to replace everything they do to run the household. Consider your needs, and make sure that you have adequate life insurance. There are also other forms of life insurance such as Mortgage Life Insurance, check out our post on the pros and cons for your reference! 3. Home/Rental Insurance Your home represents a huge, expensive asset. If it’s damaged, it’ll cost you, big time. And depending on how bad the damage is, you might not be able to live there while repairs are being made. Depending on your policy, homeowners insurance can help you pay for home repairs, short-term lodging, or even a new home . . . without a huge outlay of capital all at once. Rental insurance is also a good idea, since the landlord’s property insurance usually only covers the structure and land, but not the contents of the rental property. Thankfully, rental insurance is usually very affordable, sometimes as low as $10 a month. At that price, you can’t afford to skip it. With whichever option you need you can get instant online quotes through Lemonade. They are changing the homeowners/renters insurance market with low instant rates. Get homeowners/renters insurance rates with Lemonade>> 4. Health Insurance If you are uninsured, you may be one hospital stay away from bankruptcy. Health insurance will help you offset some of the rising costs of health care – at least when it comes to large health needs. If you have a chronic condition, health insurance can help you better afford the care you need. Even if you are in good health, and rarely use health care services, it can be a good idea to at least have a policy that covers major medical problems, just in case an accident befalls you. Get Health Insurance Rates >> 5. Disability Insurance Statistics show that 1 in 4 people will become disabled at some point before they retire. Even though this statistic includes people who receive short term disability, it is an astounding number. This makes us ask the question, “Can I afford a short term or long term disability?” Is your emergency fund large enough to sustain no income for a month? What about two months, or three months, or six months? The average monthly benefit paid by Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is $1,065 per month. Will that be enough to support your family? Disability insurance can help cover the unknown situations, and it can be a good idea, especially if you are the primary breadwinner in your household or work in a high-risk industry. Should you have an injury that qualifies for your policy, your disability insurance will pay you while you are unable to work. Disability insurance policies often vary substantially between providers, so be sure to thoroughly review your policy to understand which situations qualify for benefits, how and when you qualify for payments, how much you will receive, etc. Typically, there is a waiting period of up to 30 days or longer before disability benefits kick in, so it is always good to have an emergency fund in place so you can have something to live on in the meantime. 6. Travel Insurance Yes, you may want to consider travel insurance, especially in certain situations. For example, let’s say you plan the trip of your lifetime, and you go all out, virtually without regard to your budget (which is extreme, I know). You may not want to have to worry about spending tens of thousands of dollars and have something come up with ruins the whole deal. For a small fee, you can hedge your bets here. Of course, if you’re planning a little weekend trip and making your travel by car, you might want to pass up any extra costs. 4 Types of Insurance Policies You Don’t Need In one of my favorite episodes of the television show Family Guy, a slick door-to-door salesman convinces the bumbling Peter to purchase volcano insurance. When Peter first suggests that they’d never had volcano trouble in Rhode Island, the salesman responds “Don’t you think we’re due for one?” which of course ensures his sale. Even though it would take effort to be as naïve as Peter, there are definitely times when it’s difficult to know if the insurance you are considering is worth your money, or if it’s just another example of volcano insurance. Here are four insurance policies that you can feel comfortable skipping: 1. Life Insurance for Children The traditional purpose of life insurance is to financially provide for your family in the case of premature death. Since your children are not contributing financially to the family, and will most likely grow up to be safe and healthy, paying into premiums for their life insurance does not make sense. The money you would spend on premiums would be better spent in an emergency fund, a 529 plan for their education, or in an IRA. Exceptions: There are times when a life insurance policy for makes sense for children. This includes when your child earns an income and contributes to the family, or when you can get a very inexpensive rider on your life insurance policy. Otherwise, you may be better off skipping the life insurance policy for your children. 2. Mortgage Life Insurance On the surface, this seems like a reasonable policy. This insurance will pay off your mortgage in the event of your death, giving your family one less financial headache during a stressful time. However, a good life insurance policy should provide your heirs with enough money to handle the mortgage and any other bills that they will have to pay. There’s no need to purchase a separate policy for this—just make sure that your life insurance is adequate to cover your family’s needs. (caveat: mortgage life insurance can be a good idea if you have preexisting conditions and are ineligible for a term life insurance policy; otherwise, term is the way to go). 3. Credit Card Insurance For those who carry a balance on their credit card, having a policy that will pay your credit card bill in the event that you are unable to do so seems like a smart plan. The benefits of these plans are relatively limited, however, meaning you’re paying a monthly premium only to have your benefits capped and still be in debt. It makes much more sense to send the amount of the premium toward your bill and try to get your credit card paid off. You’ll save money on interest in addition to avoiding having to pay another bill. 4. Cancer and other Disease Insurance The sad fact of the matter is that many medical insurance policies have holes in their coverage. Because of that, specific disease insurance policies—and specifically cancer insurance—have become popular over the past few years to take care of the gaps in regular medical coverage. The problem with these types of insurance is that they are so specific, and they do not necessarily cover everything related to the disease. For example, many cancer insurance policies do not cover skin cancers, which are the most common form of the disease. A better use of your money would be to upgrade your current health insurance. That way you’re covered no matter what happens. When it comes to insurance, always make sure you take the time to do some research into what you need and what will be covered before you sign on the dotted line. And beware volcano insurance salesmen! [Image: Types of Insurance Policies] Are there other types of insurance people need (or should at least consider)? Leave a comment with your thoughts! Supply and Variable Charges No matter which tariff structure you select, your bill is usually divided into supply and variable charges. The supply charge is unaffected by your energy consumption. It is listed on your bill as a “supply charge” or “service charge,” and refers to a daily charge you receive regardless of how much energy you use. The supply charge is the charge you receive for being connected to the energy grid. Some suppliers offer discounts on the supply charge, which benefits households that don’t use very much energy. The second charge on your bill is a variable charge. Most of the time this appears as a “usage charge” on your bill. For electricity, suppliers charge based on cents per kilowatt hour (kWh). Most suppliers offer discounts on usage charges, which are usually the largest portion of your bill. Peak and Controlled Load Usage Peak and controlled load peak usage hours are two of the terms you’ll see a lot when looking at electricity consumption. They may appear on your bill whether or not your plan even includes peak and controlled load hours for billing purposes. Not all plans use peak and controlled load rates. Most suppliers allow you to select a single-rate tariff or a time of use tariff. The latter option takes peak usage into account. Single Rate Tariff A single rate tariff charges you the same amount for your energy consumption, regardless of the time of day you use the most energy. These plans are good for those who use the bulk of their electricity during peak hours. In contrast, a time of use plan charges higher rates during peak hours, so you’ll pay more for the energy you use during these times. Your electricity bill may still say ‘general usage’ even if you have a single rate tariff. In this case you’re not being charged more, it’s simply how the energy supplier categorises your energy use. Time of Use Tariff The time of use tariff divides the day into peak hours and controlled load hours. Peak hours vary depending on your supplier and your plan, but tend to be during times when more people are using electricity. For example, weekday afternoons and early evenings are likely to be peak times. Electricity usage is cheaper during controlled load hours and more expensive during peak times. Time of use plans tend to be better for those who use most of their energy in the morning or at night. If it’s feasible to do so, you could save money by waiting to use more electricity during controlled load hours. Block Pricing Your electricity supplier may charge you using block pricing. In this tariff type, your usage is broken into two or more blocks of kilowatt hours. Your supplier charges the first energy block at one rate. After you exceed the specified limit, you move into the second block and are charged a different rate. Some suppliers charge a lower rate for the first block and increase the rate for subsequent blocks, while other suppliers do the opposite. The majority of energy suppliers use two blocks for pricing, but some go as high as five. Block pricing can save you money if you can access a pricing model that suits your usage. Smaller households that don’t use much electricity may be able to stay within the first block and pay a lower rate. Larger households that use high amounts of electricity could benefit from block pricing that starts at a higher rate and decreases as usage goes up. A controlled load tariff is one of the more obscure tariffs you can find through electricity suppliers. It’s worth considering controlled load tariffs, because they could save you money. With a controlled load tariff, you are charged separately for the electricity used to power a specific appliance such as hot water or slab heating. The controlled load appliance runs on a separate circuit than the rest of your home, and may have its own meter. The supplier charges one rate for your normal electricity usage, and a different rate for the controlled load. The catch to controlled load tariffs is that the appliance can only be used during a specified time frame. In New South Wales and Queensland you can choose between controlled load one and controlled load 2: the first option is cheaper, but the second operates under a longer time frame. Controlled load tariffs are designed for appliances that don’t need to run continuously, which is why they work well for hot water systems. Can a Controlled Load Tariff Save You Money? Some suppliers, however, provide discounts with no strings attached. Weigh up these discounts carefully when making your decision. The amount of money you save will also depend on a few factors. Your location and the supplier’s rate will determine whether or not it’s worth separating one or two of your major appliances on a controlled load. To access a controlled load tariff, customers will typically need to make arrangements with their electricity provider. Mortgage rates are continuing their downward spiral. According to Freddie Mac, the average rate on a 30-year fixed-rate loan has dropped to just 3.82%—down from 4.54% last June and its lowest point in nearly two years. The dip presents a prime opportunity for buyers and existing homeowners alike. For those looking to get out of the rent race, it means the most affordable interest rates since September 2017. As Vishal Garg, CEO of digital mortgage lender Better.com, explains, “Now is the most opportune time to get a loan. If you’re renting, you’re simply paying your landlord’s mortgage.” For those who already own a home, the rate drop could mean serious financial savings over time. In fact, according to data and analytics firm Black Knight, nearly every mortgage loan originated in 2018 could see a rate drop via refinancing. In total, a whopping 6.8 million homeowners could now qualify for a refinance and save at least 75 basis points—or around $268 per month. Less than two months ago, just 2 million homeowners could see these kinds of savings. Still, it’s not all about the rate. Refinance-eligible homeowners also have a chance to leverage their home equity. As Garg says, it’s “a rare opportunity for Americans to improve their financial health.” “If you have any other type of debt—car loan, credit card, student loan—and you own a home, you can tap into the equity of your home to pay off these other higher-interest loans,” Garg said. But experts caution that Freddie Mac’s average rate is just that—an average. Rates vary greatly from lender to lender, and a borrower's credit, debts and other factors all play a role in mortgage rates as well. In order to get the best rate possible, Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist Sam Khafer says shopping around is key. “While the drop in mortgage rates is a good opportunity for consumers to save on their mortgage payment, our research indicates that there can be a wide dispersion among mortgage rate offers,” he said. Khater estimates the average buyer can save around $1,500 up front by getting just one additional mortgage quote. Over the life of a 30-year loan, shopping around can save buyers more than $44,000, according to LendingTree's most recent Mortgage Comparison Shopping Report. That is both an easy and complex question, so let's do easy first: As a rule, in the United States the terms lawyer and attorney are interchangeable. Now for the hard answer. It's hard because we have to go back a bit in history to understand the distinctions. The term "lawyer" was generally used to refer to any person who has studied and been trained in the law. The lawyers of the early U.S. nationhood are a good example. Someone like John Adams or Thomas Jefferson were not only leaders of the American Revolution but they also were lawyers. An interesting note on Adams's career is that he actually provided a learned, principled, and successful defense of the British soldiers accused of crimes arising from the Boston Massacre. His reason was the same that many criminal defense attorneys cite today for their own careers. Every person, no matter how they are seen by the general public, deserves a zealous and competent defense (something we now find in the Sixth Amendment of the Constitution). As education in the U.S. improved and law began to become its own discipline, the term "attorney at law" (also attorney-at-law) was created around 1768. For a short time there was an effort to distinguish the two terms. The lawyer was one who studied and graduated after studying law, however, they were not necessarily seen as someone who had passed the bar; therefore they did not "practice law" before a court. Even today we see that one can graduate from an American law school, thus becoming a lawyer, but not pass the bar exam. Without the passing score on the bar exam, one can't be admitted to practice law in the jurisdiction (state or federal). The attorney at law, which was later shortened to just attorney, was used in some instances to mean a professional who is qualified to give legal advice and to represent a party in court. Eventually, the early form of the law degree (which was considered a professional degree much like that for the ministry or medicine) evolved to a point that it would require a much higher level of education in order to be reasonably qualified. Today, the terms attorney and lawyer are used interchangeably, mostly because the need to distinguish the right to practice law became so well defined with the expansion of the individual jurisdictions judicial system and also because the qualifying degree today to sit for the bar exam is a professional doctorate degree; usually the Juris Doctorate or J.D. There are still those who graduate from law school but never sit for the bar exam. The law degree is an excellent degree which can be used in many areas of business and government work other than the practice of law. Thus, the concept that one is a lawyer by virtue of the law degree still exists, it is just not enforced as enthusiastically as in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
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